Book

Global Consumer Behavior

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Abstract

Globalization is a leading force for industry worldwide, especially the new technology sector. This presents both problems and opportunities in the emergence of a new type of consumer and the effects of globalization on industry in terms of culture, economics, marketing, and social issues at every scale from local to global. The main aim of the book is to enhance the reader's knowledge - especially from a multidisciplinary perspective rather than from an individual functional perspective - of international consumer behaviour. It also explores the role of globalization in the evolving world of the new technology sector and provides an overview of the development of international consumer behavior from historical, geographical and social perspectives, while focusing on new technology products and services. Professionals, students and researchers working in the fields of new technologies and information and communication technologies (ICT) as well as specialists of marketing and management are the target audience for this book. At the same time, the book will be pitched at a level so as to also appeal to a more general readership interested in globalization.
... On the other hand, depending on a country's political, economic, technological, and social environment, consumers may develop a particular attitude towards its products and brands (Ammi, 2013); thus, consumers' perception of the quality of a given product tends to be closely associated with their knowledge about the country where the product was made, and in certain cases, with the nation's level of economic development (Bertoli, 2013). Consequently, products from more developed countries generally tend to have a more positive image than those manufactured in less developed nations, which will influence consumers' perception about the quality of the goods (Apetrei, 2010). ...
... Research findings revealed that COO can become an important extrinsic cue for consumers when assessing the quality of a specific product, especially when they are unfamiliar with the item (Ammi, 2013), even though consumers may also use other extrinsic cues like price to evaluate the product's quality (Ammi, 2013). Furthermore, apart from the fact that COO apparently influences consumers' perception regarding the quality of a product, it may also have an impact on their attitudes, behaviours, and purchasing decision process (Ammi, 2013;Baker & Ballington, 2002). ...
... Research findings revealed that COO can become an important extrinsic cue for consumers when assessing the quality of a specific product, especially when they are unfamiliar with the item (Ammi, 2013), even though consumers may also use other extrinsic cues like price to evaluate the product's quality (Ammi, 2013). Furthermore, apart from the fact that COO apparently influences consumers' perception regarding the quality of a product, it may also have an impact on their attitudes, behaviours, and purchasing decision process (Ammi, 2013;Baker & Ballington, 2002). ...
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The present study attempts to understand the use of three information processing mechanisms – cognitive, affective, and normative – to assess the quality of cashmere products made in Mongolia. For attaining the above aims, semi-structured interviews were conducted to test a framework that resulted from literature reviewed on country of origin (COO) effect and information processing mechanisms. Results demonstrate that for Business-to-Business (B2B) clients, the COO is an extremely relevant cue to evaluate the quality of cashmere. Conversely, most of the consumers do not seem to include the COO effect on their information processing and base their evaluation on four distinct product-related attributes: quality, brand, social status, and price. Results are relevant for the Mongolian cashmere industry, as well as for marketers interested in understanding what drives consumers of cashmere in their buying decisions. We also understand these findings to assist in improving the image of Mongolia as one of the world’s best manufacturers of cashmere.
... Basically, research involving shopping based on gender differences is actually not a new theme. Since the 1960s various studies on the role of gender in determining one's shopping behavior have been carried out by many marketing experts (Ammi, 2007). Many researchers have examined differences in characteristics between women and men in terms of preferences of shopping. ...
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This research tries to find several factors triggering female workers to shop. It involved 70 respondents that are active female workers. The method use here is OLS (Ordinary Least Square) that makes us easy to explain relational framework of independent variables toward dependent variable. Based on the result, we find that decision to shop is affected by only two independent variables: decision-making and external locus of control. The rest of independent variables do not have effect at all. This finding proves that the tendency of female workers to shop is constituted by their own attitude and the external environment that they cannot handle.
... Since the 1990s, even before the widespread use of the Internet, global Western brands were already using the term to address a critical mass of consumers that was forming worldwide (O'Reilly, 1991). The emergence of this type of consumer is a result of the effects of globalisation (Ammi, 2007). The global consumer usually has global brands, which represent a sense of belonging to the global consumer culture (Okazaki, Mueller, & Taylor, 2010), are highly informed and aesthetically sophisticated (Arnould, 2010), and have technological skills (Malison, 2015). ...
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Free PDF copy: https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/dyBsRuC6ZwAwpJgM7eD5/full?target=10.1080/17543266.2017.1352039 ABSTRACT: An understanding of youth culture is fundamental for attracting new consumers. However, few qualitative studies have analysed adolescent fashion consumer behaviour. Utilising a dramaturgical framework, this qualitative research aims to understand the adolescent’s relationship to fashion by identifying the values guiding adolescent social performance. The ethnographic study proceeded with 16 participants between the ages of 13 and 18 from various socio-economic strata in Medellín, Colombia. Four value segments were used to describe these teens’ performances: Trendy, Undercover, Luxury Pink, and Free Style. The values of these adolescent consumers prioritised ‘being well respected’, ‘a sense of belonging’, ‘excitement’, and ‘fun and enjoyment of life’. Findings indicated that while some of these emerging market adolescents adhered to global generalisations made about teenagers, certain specific contextual influences were found to express their values and, by extension, their fashion wants. Additional theoretical contributions were found by examining differences in the expression of values across value segments.
... The innate characteristics of Chinese people is that they are risk averse, long-term oriented, and focused on the collective family unit [6]. Therefore, as consumers they tend to be conservative, researching their prospective purchases, and considering the requirements of their families. ...
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The paper explored Chinese consumers’ behavior with specific focus on categories of “mass consumers” and “new mainstream consumers” who together constitute the vast majority of consumers, using an online questionnaire hosted on a Chinese survey website called "So jump" was used. Through email and social networking, personal requests were sent to known associates across the six strata of the Chinese populations to complete the online questionnaire as well as forward it to their extended networks. It became evident that the consumers have extremely low levels of knowledge about MEISs; they ranked the best method of storing MEIS data as “database storage” such as a cloud service that was managed by an emergency Call Centre operation, followed by “personal portable electronic storage”, and then “printed format.” An overwhelming majority of the respondents believed that a MEIS would offer considerable benefit to their families in an emergency.
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The concept of dual channel supply chain (DCSC) allows retailers to sell their products broadly. Channel collaboration, offline and online, helps companies to survive amid the competition through increasing profits. Nonetheless a review of previous studies in DCSC provided no explicit model addressing consumer behavior to shift channel preference in two directions, offline to online as well as online to offline. This study proposes an analog model to elicit the factors that influence consumer preferences for switching channels from offline to online and from online to offline by using push pull mooring (PPM) approach. Such approach may identify the variables involved in consumer channel switching-intention. The selected object is apparel retailer under dual-channel structure. Furthermore the data is collected by means of questionnaires. Structural equation modelling (SEM) used to identify variables that have a significant effect on consumer switching intention. The results of this study may be used as reference for researchers and apparel retailer managers under DCSC structure to create their operational plans in conducting their business.
Article
This study examined North American and South Korean preferences for different lighting conditions in a hotel guestroom. A sample of 87 North Americans and 88 Koreans (N = 175) rated their preference for different intensities and color temperatures of light within a digitally generated hotel guestroom design. A mixed between-within analysis of variance (Kuehl, 1999) evaluated three dependent variables (preference, arousal, and pleasure) against three independent variables (two culture groups × two light colors × two light intensities). Findings indicated that North American subjects preferred the hotel guestroom with low intensity and warm color lighting the most, whereas the Korean group preferred high intensity and warm color lighting the most. North American participants also perceived dim lighting as more arousing than bright lighting, whereas Korean participants perceived bright lighting as more arousing than dim lighting. Overall, the findings suggest that design criteria for hotel guestroom lighting should be revised to account for distinct cultural differences.
Article
Tactile properties of cosmetic products constitute weak stimuli and thus can be expected to be easily modified by mental images. In order to enhance an intended positive-emotion-inducing effect of such a product, its experience can be embedded in a certain 'world' that generates a positive emotional imagination. The present study investigated such an influence in 12 males and 12 females, half of each being laymen and experts in sensory assessment. Two product worlds (emotional and technical) and three different hair samples, two of them treated with different shampoos and an untreated one as control, were presented to each subject in counter-balanced order of all six combinations. An objective emotional assessment using a psychophysiological technique developed in an earlier study was applied and compared with a traditional sensory assessment. Among the physiological measures, peripheral blood volume and facial muscular activity were the most sensitive in revealing effects of and interactions between the product worlds and hair samples. A multivariate evaluation of the physiological data revealed three discriminant functions that explained 78.4% of the total variance and enabled a re-classification considerably better than chance. The first discriminant function clearly separated the treated from the untreated hair samples which was not possible by subjective ratings or traditional sensory assessment. The two other discriminant functions comprised a hedonistic and a product world factor. The emotional product world exerted the largest influence in case of the weakest tactile differences between the hair samples, and its influence was larger on laymen than on experts. Gender effects were most prominent in the subjective domain. In conclusion, multivariate psychophysiological methodology is superior to traditional sensory assessment in revealing subtle differences in the tactile perception of cosmetic products.
Article
In 1958, Pierre Martineau proposed (without empirical backup) that the “middle-class” and the “lower-status” groups in the United States were different in regard to time, locale, reasoning, choice making, confidence, thinking, and interpretation of events. To test Martineau's hypotheses, a one-stage area sample of 506 lower and middle-class households in a south-central town in the United States, were administered a Likert summated ratings scaled instrument. It was found that the respondents agreed with Martineau on reasoning, choice making, and to some degree, interpretation of events. Martineau's other hypotheses (time, confidence, and thinking) were not upheld in this study. After we point out areas worthy of future research, some implications for marketing managers and authors of general marketing and consumer behavior textbooks are given.
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