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Automating the Selection of Standard Parallels for Conic Map Projections

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... Los productos cartográficos finales se desarrollaron en POSGAR 2007/Argentina Faja 2 (EPSG:5344). La determinación de superficies planas se realizó en el sistema Cónico de Albers (Snyder, 1987) que asegura una mínima distorsión en las áreas graficadas (Jenny, 2012;Šavrič & Jenny, 2016). Para el ajuste de paralelos de referencia ecuatorial y polar (ϕ1 y ϕ2) se aplicó la función dependiente de los paralelos extremos que alcanzó cada UH mapeada (ϕmin y ϕmáx), (Snyder, 1987;Bugayevskiy & Snyder, 1995;Šavrič & Jenny, 2016) y aplicando un valor K=4 de acuerdo con la propuesta de Kavrayskiy para las formas predominantes en esta región (Bugayevskiy & Snyder, 1995) Tabla 2. Parámetros utilizados para el cálculo de superficies mediante el sistema Equivalente Cónico de Albers, en superficies resultantes de cada UH, expresados en decimal de grado. ...
... La determinación de superficies planas se realizó en el sistema Cónico de Albers (Snyder, 1987) que asegura una mínima distorsión en las áreas graficadas (Jenny, 2012;Šavrič & Jenny, 2016). Para el ajuste de paralelos de referencia ecuatorial y polar (ϕ1 y ϕ2) se aplicó la función dependiente de los paralelos extremos que alcanzó cada UH mapeada (ϕmin y ϕmáx), (Snyder, 1987;Bugayevskiy & Snyder, 1995;Šavrič & Jenny, 2016) y aplicando un valor K=4 de acuerdo con la propuesta de Kavrayskiy para las formas predominantes en esta región (Bugayevskiy & Snyder, 1995) Tabla 2. Parámetros utilizados para el cálculo de superficies mediante el sistema Equivalente Cónico de Albers, en superficies resultantes de cada UH, expresados en decimal de grado. Donde: * Solo se consideró la Subregión Hidrográfica Río Chico, integrante de esta RH, que consiste en una región con recursos hídricos compartidos con la provincia de Santa Cruz. ...
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Watershed definition is fundamental for integrated management of water resources, considering the social, productive and environmental demands. The watershed spatial delimitation is essential to understand eco-hydrological processes in the territory and management. The objective of this work was to delineate and code the hydrographic regions of Southern Patagonia under standardized procedures and new geographic information technologies. The ALOS World 3D model, WorldView high-resolution scenes and QGIS 3.12 free software algorithms were used to carry out automated watershed delineations at various hydrological nesting levels, and subsequent coding and nomenclature. A precise cartographic product was achieved at a scale of 1: 25,000 on a territory of 366,357.4 km2. This results in 7,307 hydrographic units distributed in 5 levels, with 14 large hydrographic regions (RH) in the upper level, 46 sub-regions, 249 hydrographic basins, 1,110 sub-basins and 5,888 microbasins. The cartography achieved improved the resolution and precision of actual available regional products, representing a valuable tool for the sustainable water resources management at different levels of organization and complexity of natural processes.
... Given the continued application and research of map projections, more stringent requirements are required for accurate and efficient transformations between different projections. The key is to complete mutual transformation of important variables, such as common latitude, more efficiently to ensure high accuracy [8][9][10][11][12]. Much in-depth research has been conducted on this, leading to theories of latitude change. ...
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