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Interactive Design and Community Participation: The Case of Mullae Art Village

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Abstract

This article considers the role of community participation, interactive performance art and global ambition in the case of the artistic community in the village of Mullae, South Korea. Mullae Art Village emerged as a commune of artists and performers from an industrial slum and has transformed the community's identity and function. The author examines the importance of user-focused event design and examples of participatory and interactive art through an extended case study of Mullae. Drawing on ethnographic observation, document analysis and an in-depth interview, the case study charts the shifting priorities of the artists' village, its events and its artistic projects. The article concludes by considering the implications for management of this grassroots "unmanaged" community.

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