Conference Paper

Back to the Future of EUD: The Logic of Bricolage for the Paving of EUD Roadmaps

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Abstract

Several recent approaches to EUD increasingly recognize an active role of users in the construction of the tools that support their daily practices. However, there is still a lack of a general framework that could play a role in the comparison of existing proposals and in the development of new EUD solutions. The paper proposes a conceptual framework and a related architecture, called Logic of Bricolage, that aims to be a step further in this direction. The concluding remarks point to the potential value of this conceptualization effort in the EUD field.

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... The high ceiling means that the user can create a more complicated solution. Some approaches, like the Logic of Bricolage (LOB) [4], exists to help for the conception of EUD. ...
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