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What Our Ancestors Knew: Teaching and Learning Through Storytelling

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Abstract

The art of storytelling is traced from its roots in indigenous cultural societies. Storytelling in education is described as a participatory learning process that promotes community and understanding.

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... One such way to build relationships is through storytelling. Storytelling has been seen to have both pedagogical benefits (Alterio & McDrury, 2004;Lawrence & Paige, 2016;McDrury & Alterio, 2001) as well as the ability to foster/build relationships (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Stone, 1996 � ). It has been argued that storytelling is natural to human beings, particularly when they want to relate something of their lives to other human beings (Daiute, 2014;Kim, 2016;Riessman, 2008 � ;Sommer, 2009). ...
... One such way to build relationships is through storytelling. Storytelling has been seen to have both pedagogical benefits (Alterio & McDrury, 2004;Lawrence & Paige, 2016;McDrury & Alterio, 2001) as well as the ability to foster/build relationships (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Stone, 1996 � ). It has been argued that storytelling is natural to human beings, particularly when they want to relate something of their lives to other human beings (Daiute, 2014;Kim, 2016;Riessman, 2008 � ;Sommer, 2009). ...
... This is because stories add to the raw, real, and personal qualities of the topic in question, making the topic easier to internalize for the listener (Rossiter & Clark, 2007). Lawrence and Paige (2016) similarly suggested that storytelling makes theories and ideas more real for students. Stories give students tangible, real-world examples to hang ideas upon. ...
Article
In this paper, we describe a mentoring program designed to help prepare high school seniors at Arizona State University Preparatory Academy for postsecondary education. Specifically, we address the usefulness of ‘humanistic mentoring,’ a form of mentoring that stresses the importance of reciprocity, mutuality, and empathy in the mentor/mentee relationship. We further describe how sharing stories was useful in developing such humanistic relationships. Based on etic-thematic coding of interviews from 13 of the mentees, a humanistic lens for mentoring and sharing personal stories is productive for both developing relationships and passing on knowledge.
... The act of storytelling engages learners through multiple senses, memories, connections, and emotions. Indeed, storytelling is a multifaceted learning tool and "a way to make sense of our own experience and to communicate that experience to others" (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Andrews (2007) defined the importance of such narrative experience the following way: "Stories are not only the way in which we come to ascribe significance to experiences… but they are one of the primary means through which we constitute our very selves…we become who we are through telling stories about our lives and living the stories we tell" (pp. ...
... 35). The listener plays a vital role too, not only as a respectful, engaged audience member, but as someone who may connect deeply with the story and come to a new personal understanding through listening (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Storytelling also "requires attention and slowing down" (Tyler, 2009, p. 137) and so becomes an effective language-learning tool for seniors who require a slower pace for their language learning and ample repetition. ...
... This collective energy permeated the class, at times moving the listeners to tears when we shared stories of loss or setting off heated exchanges when we reflected on ethnicity and nation building. As Lawrence and Paige (2016) pointed out, "Sharing our stories in dialogue with others helps us to understand the concepts at a deeper level" (p. 67). ...
Article
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This article examines the role of storytelling as an arts-based educational approach in an older-adult immigrant language-learning program. As a special group within the adult language-learner population, immigrant seniors benefit from educational strategies that emphasize recognition of life experience over knowledge accumulation, which is a common goal of more traditional educational approaches. We present a small study of a storytelling class held within the English Conversation Program at the University of British Columbia Learning Exchange. Based on compelling results, we argue that storytelling is a powerful strategy that not only facilitates language learning, but creates a safe, inclusive learning community.
... Narratives exist in the human world in an infinite diversity of forms. Researchers agree that the real-world narratives shared by experts and knowledge workers are helpful in educating novices to learn new knowledge and skills (Lawrence and Paige, 2016;Burke and Kass, 1995). A narrative helps to retain human memory, especially cultural memories of the past. ...
... Apart from retaining knowledge and wisdom, narratives are useful tools for humans to recall and share knowledge during their lifespans (Burnett et al., 2015;Bluck and Glück, 2004). A narrative is an important means to represent and transfer lessons learned to novices (Lawrence and Paige, 2016;Tappan and Brown, 1989). Geiger and Schreyögg (2012) argue that narratives aid in knowledge retention, sharing and problem solving. ...
... Researchers have advocated the use of real-world narratives shared by experts and knowledge workers to help in educating novices to learn new knowledge and skills (Lawrence and Paige, 2016;Burke and Kass, 1995). Through reading texts, humans can construct coherent situations models related to the texts. ...
Article
Lessons learned knowledge is traditionally gained from trial and error or narratives describing past experiences. Learning from narratives is the preferred option to transfer lessons learned knowledge. However, learners with insufficient prior knowledge often experience difficulties in grasping the right information from narratives. This paper introduces an approach that uses narrative maps to represent lessons learned knowledge to help learners understand narratives. Since narrative mapping is a time-consuming, labor-intensive and knowledge-intensive process, the proposed approach is supported by a computational narrative mapping (CNM) method to automate the process. CNM incorporates advanced technologies, such as computational linguistics and artificial intelligence (AI), to identify and extract critical narrative elements from an unstructured, text-based narrative and organize them into a structured narrative map representation. This research uses a case study conducted in the construction industry to evaluate CNM performance in comparison with existing paragraph and concept mapping approaches. Among the results, over 90% of respondents asserted that CNM enhanced their understanding of the lessons learned. CNM's performance in identifying and extracting narrative elements was evaluated through an experiment using real-life narratives from a reminiscence study. The experiment recorded a precision and recall rate of over 75%. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0952197618300320
... Even with the upsurge of digital technologies and new modes of communication, storytelling has continued to be an essential method for sharing information and knowledge (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Storytelling, throughout history, has facilitated learning and teaching, the exploration of alternate realities, meaning-making, and the preservation of culture (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Thomas, 2005). ...
... Even with the upsurge of digital technologies and new modes of communication, storytelling has continued to be an essential method for sharing information and knowledge (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Storytelling, throughout history, has facilitated learning and teaching, the exploration of alternate realities, meaning-making, and the preservation of culture (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Thomas, 2005). For instance, information about surviving the harsh conditions of the Arctic was passed along generations of Inuit through oral traditions (Alexander et al., 2009). ...
Article
This paper reports on an examination and analysis of digital storytelling interface features and functionalities within a select number of Indigenous digital libraries and archives in order to support and inform the participatory and culturally-informed design and development of a digital storytelling system for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) in Canada’s Western Arctic region. This paper provides an introduction to digital storytelling and the use of digital media in Indigenous communities to preserve oral traditions and stories in digital archives. It also presents participatory and inclusive design ideas and examples from Canada, US, and Australia to demonstrate and emphasize the importance of community engagement and community-based archiving for cultural heritage preservation and access.
... In our cultural context, storytelling is considered an effective way of communicating messages from adults to young children. Lawrence & Paige (2016) is also saying in this favour that storytelling is one of the powerful tools to boost children imagination and to develop their understanding of the world around them. According to Isil (2016), young age children are fond of stories and the stories they have been hearing from their parents at a young age they enjoy in later age. ...
... ECE teachers may add the students' imagination to enhance their understanding and overcome problems. Research has proven storytelling as an effective method of successful communication to understand others' emotions and convey their own to others; similarly, it is equally effective for sharing information and knowledge (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Summing up the above-mentioned thing, according to Sharda (2007), it can be stated that storytelling is not only effective pedagogical approach to attain the objectives of general education, but it is equally effective to obtain the learning objectives for technical and scientific education. ...
Article
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Teachers use several methods to teach children in Early childhood Education classes. Storytelling and play-way methods are employed to teach initial concepts in a conducive and stimulating learning environment. The purpose of this study was to identify the mindfulness, utilization, and challenges faced by ECE teachers while teaching through these methods. The phenomenological design was employed by using a qualitative research approach. The ten ECE schoolteachers were selected as participants, who were teaching to grade one student through the purposive sampling technique. Self-developed semi-structured interviews were carried out, and the data were transcribed into codes and themes. The research revealed that teachers were more aware of the storytelling method than the play way method. They were facing different challenges while using the storytelling and play-way method at the ECE level. It is recommended that resource rooms should be established for the provision of the best opportunities for training to ECE teachers.
... Even with the upsurge of digital technologies and new modes of communication, storytelling has continued to be an essential method for sharing information and knowledge (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Storytelling, throughout history, has facilitated learning and teaching, the exploration of alternate realities, meaning-making, and the preservation of culture (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Thomas, 2005). ...
... Even with the upsurge of digital technologies and new modes of communication, storytelling has continued to be an essential method for sharing information and knowledge (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Storytelling, throughout history, has facilitated learning and teaching, the exploration of alternate realities, meaning-making, and the preservation of culture (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Thomas, 2005). Furthermore, storytelling today has become both a tool of resistance and an opportunity to go back in time (Thomas, 2005, p. 252;Corntassel, Chaw-winis, & T'lakwadzi, 2009). ...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on an examination and analysis of digital storytelling interface features and functionalities within a select number of Indigenous digital libraries and archives to support and inform the participatory and culturally-informed design and development of a digital storytelling system for the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Western Arctic. The paper presents participatory and inclusive design ideas and examples from Canada, US, and Australia.
... Beyond entertainment, telling and hearing stories is an effective dimension to the learning process (Bandura, 1977;Grossman, Salas, Pavlas, & Rosen, 2013;Jones 1996;Lawrence & Paige, 2016). Storytelling is effective, regardless of the age of the listener or the context of the learning environment (Caminotti & Gray, 2012) or even the medium in which the story is told (Beamish & Beamish, 2015;Hathaway, 2013). ...
... In other words, the story provides a teachable moment. Lawrence and Paige (2016) argue that one of the essential elements of a great story, and by extension its value as a learning tool, is its believability. There is no question that The Martian is a work of fiction. ...
Article
Art reflects reality, in science fiction as well as in everyday praxis. And it provides an entertaining approach to comprehending enduring characteristics of administration. Eighty years ago, Luther Gulick coined the acronym POSDCORB (planning, organizing, staffing, directing, coordinating, reporting, and budgeting) to capture the essential elements of public administration. To demonstrate the enduring nature of Gulick’s summation, this article draws parallels between the acronym and the popular novel and screenplay The Martian, a story of space exploration and rescue. The comparison situates the importance of POSDCORB even when describing the frontier of space travel. Applying as well to a trip to Mars as to managing public lands or ensuring food safety, we argue that the routines of public administration are also the routines of rocket science. The comparison provides a contemporary way to teach a classic paradigm.
... They continue the strong historical and traditional connections between generations which encourages Aboriginal people to be resilient (Bacon, 2013). Yarning not only preserves oral traditions and culture but also provides a way for one to identify experiences and develop empathy (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). ...
... By using yarning circles in research, Donovan (2015) found he could encourage Aboriginal students to share their perspectives through storytelling. The use of storytelling can create an atmosphere of trust and a non-judgmental environment, instilling confidence and encouraging reflexivity to create a culturally safe space (Lawrence & Paige, 2016). ...
Article
Teaching Aboriginal content in social work education presents risks of retraumatisation for students. There are international calls for a trauma-informed teaching model that creates cultural safety in the classroom. This study aimed to develop a trauma-informed model for social work education by reviewing the literature on cultural safety for Aboriginal peoples. This model incorporates key aspects of ensuring Aboriginal cultural safety: de-colonise social work education; collaborative partnerships; build relationships; critical reflection; develop cultural courage; and yarning and story-telling. It provides a valuable framework for creating a more equitable teaching and learning environment that also ensures the essential academic content is covered. IMPLICATIONS • Trauma underlies the historical, contemporary and cultural narratives of Aboriginal peoples. Students engaging in Aboriginal content that is traumatic can mean connecting with trauma that has occurred in their own lives. • Trauma-informed teaching and learning will ensure that educators create culturally safe spaces that enable students to engage well with content. • The adoption of the framework proposed in this paper may lead to the creation of a culturally safe space for teaching and learning in social work education.
... Using art as a teaching strategy provides many additional benefits for adults such as IDPs. These include: first, creating space or distance for remembering and discussing painful experiences in safe ways (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Schimpf-Herken & Baumann, 2015). Second, encouraging learning processes that incorporate indigenous, intuitive and embodied knowledge, as well as cognitive-rational reflection (Butterwick, 2017;Lawrence, 2005;Yang, 2017). ...
... Though some artistic activities such as theatrical performances (Schimpf-Herken & Baumann, 2015), dance (Snowber, 2012), or creating murals (Sanders-Bustle & Lalik, 2017) may require greater skill, other activities are more accessible. These include visits to museums (Schimpf-Herken & Baumann, 2015), singing folk songs (Lems, 2005), painting and drawing (Mantas & Schwind, 2014), and storytelling (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Prins, 2017). ...
Article
This study explored the use of art as a teaching strategy with internally displaced adults. Two curricula were pilot tested with five groups of adults in Colombia, and follow-up interviews were conducted with facilitators and participants. Feedback showed that artistic activities allowed participants to reflect upon their experiences, understand the underlying principles in key biblical texts, and build relationships. Artistic activities also sensitized facilitators toward the struggles that internally displaced adults deal with every day.
... Since qualitative research has the capacity to provide holistic descriptions of an insider's perspective, youth's and CM's lived experience of program activities can be captured and shared within the findings. Additionally, the results can be used to provide the audience with vicarious experiences of the participant's story and this can promote empathy and understanding (Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Phillips, 2013;Schank & Berman, 2006). This, in turn, can support decolonization as it can enhance understanding of the FNMI reality, particularly with non-FNMI audiences. ...
Article
First Nations, Métis, and Inuit (FNMI) youth experience many health disparities in comparison with their mainstream Canadian peers. Researchers have recommended that interventions developed to enhance health and well-being for FNMI youth apply a strengths-based approach that acknowledges contextual challenges. This article uses a qualitative approach to examine the perceived impacts of a program designed to enhance positive development and leadership in FNMI youth. Semistructured interviews were conducted with front-line staff and participants. A thematic data analysis resulted in three major themes that describe the perceived program effects at the participant, staff, and community levels. Findings are discussed in relation to current research and theory, and recommendations are provided for programming and future research. Leadership programming for FNMI youth may be an effective way to promote development across many levels of stakeholders.
... From the time when early indigenous peoples used storytelling to pass on information from elders, it has served as a key cultural role in societies. As Lawrence and Paige (2016) argue, "Storytelling among ancient peoples has historically served two primary functions: to entertain and to teach people how to become better human beings" (p. 63). ...
Conference Paper
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This paper presents a work in progress. Traditionally, uses of podcasts often involve capturing a face-to-face lecture. In this paper, we discuss using a curated list of podcasts to introduce a social justice educational perspective into history classrooms. Shutting down all other media channels but one, the podcast shines a bright light on the power of voices and stories. We can hear the stories of those who have and are experiencing history, tell their stories, engage in a dialogue about their stories, and uncover the voices of those whose story was never told.
... Storytelling among IPs helps to forge a number of purposes, such as entertaining, passing down a repertoire of culturally built knowledge, maintaining a sense of community, and instilling moral values, all of which laid the groundwork for social collaboration (Nabokov 2006;Lawrence & Paige 2016). A key feature of indigenous storytelling is the intergenerational transmission of experience, allowing for human adaptation to different environments (Brown 2013;Egeland et al. 2013). ...
Article
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Several intergovernmental policy instruments, including the World Heritage Convention of UNESCO and the Convention on Biological Diversity, have proposed to develop integrated strategies to build bridges between biological and cultural diversity agendas. We contend that to succeed in this endeavor, it is crucial to link biocultural revitalization to conservation practice. Our hope with this review is to call attention to indigenous storytelling as an option worth adding to the repertoire of conservation practitioners who aim to: (1) link conservation actions to indigenous worldviews; (2) foster connections between indigenous peoples and their landscapes; (3) facilitate intergenerational transfer of indigenous knowledge; (4) support dialogue over conservation; and (5) promote local participation in conservation. Because indigenous stories are full of resonance, memory, and wisdom—in a footing that is structurally free of power imbalance between conservation practitioners and local communities—, we contend that they can be crucial to guide future efforts in biocultural conservation practice. Our review shows that deeper consideration and promotion of indigenous storytelling can lead to enhanced understanding of diverse values and perceptions around biodiversity, while offering a constructive approach for greater inclusion of indigenous peoples in conservation pursuits.
... It can involve two or more participants. It continues First Nation People's oral traditions and builds deep reflection and empathy amongst non-Indigenous participants (Lawrence and Paige, 2016). Dadirri is a form of listening which encompasses yarning but includes silence and quite stillness. ...
Article
Health inequalities experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia are among the most marked in the world. Life expectancy differences starkly demonstrate these health inequalities, with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders dying some ten years earlier than non-Indigenous Australians. This stark health inequality persists despite significant long-term policy efforts at closing the gap. The failure of successive Australian and State Governments policies and programs in addressing the stark health inequality between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians suggests new questions need to be explored. This paper arose from yarning between an Indigenous woman and a non-Indigenous woman wishing to better understand how Aboriginal wellbeing and health are shaped. Through this yarning the importance of Worldview emerged as an under-acknowledge social determinant of Aboriginal wellbeing. In this paper we argue that Worldview – ways of knowing, ways of doing and ways of being - is critical to well-being for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults and children alike. We draw on a yarning case study over a life course to support our argument for the inclusion of Aboriginal Worldview as a key social determinant of health. We conclude the paper with a discussion of the implications of Aboriginal Worldview for health and social work practice.
... This approach utilizes the strengths from Indigenous education to benefit children and youth from the general population. Researchers have identified that stories can enhance learning as it enhances meaning, relevance and learner engagement and promotes retention (Davis, 2014;Green, 2004;Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Phillips, 2013). Furthermore, experiential education, a traditional Indigenous approach, can promote critical thinking and ability to apply new knowledge, a deeper understanding of content, and the ability to engage in lifelong learning across contexts (Eyler, 2009). ...
Chapter
Recognizing that youth will play a critical role in shaping our future and taking consideration of the environmental crisis at hand, it is imperative to examine new ways to engage young people in environmental efforts so that they can contribute to viable solutions related to environmental sustainability. This chapter examines Sport for Development opportunities, with a specific focus on outdoor recreation programming as a significant opportunity to promote youth connection to nature and engagement in environmental sustainability in order to enhance environmental outcomes in the future. It highlights the health benefits that can be derived from engaging in nature and emphasizes that this may help to moderate human investment in the environment and influence engagement in sustainable behaviors. This chapter also examines a range of program approaches and applies ecological systems theory to examine the benefits, both for youth as well as for the community and environment. Finally, it applies ecological systems theory to examine Indigenous programming and the concept of two-eyed seeing.
... Stories are used globally for communicating, conveying, and developing knowledge (Connelly & Clandinin, 1990;Lawrence & Paige, 2016;Vogt et al., 2021). They can help contextualize problems and explore links between topics that appear disconnected yet have common drivers that may not be immediately obvious. ...
Article
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Climate change has exacerbated environmental problems globally, exposing the inadequacy of land management plans designed to function best under stable and predictable circumstances. Indigenous land management practices have received considerable attention for maintaining resilient, biodiverse ecosystems in the face of change and complexity. This has stimulated ample research on transdisciplinary collaboration between Western science and Indigenous Ways of Knowing (IWK) to promote sustainable land management practices. Equitable partnership that furthers these goals may remain out of reach, however, without addressing the ongoing marginalization and erasure of Indigenous ontologies and epistemologies. A fundamental shift toward epistemologically plural, multicultural approaches in environmental science education in the United States is vital for ameliorating deep-rooted, systemic, cultural injustices in land management. The failure to incorporate plural epistemologies in the classroom may help to explain the intractable nature of environmental problems through the suppression of ideological diversity needed to address complex problems. In this study, community-based design research (CBDR) was utilized over a three-year period to design a multicultural framework for environmental education in collaboration with tribal and place-based educators. It was conducted within a university-level environmental science course taught at an R1 Research Institution in the Northwestern United States. This collaborative effort included members of three (redacted for review) State tribes and a multidisciplinary team of K-12 and university-level instructors. Through an iterative process, our team developed curricula to decolonize environmental science education using holistic pedagogical tools from both Western and Indigenous traditions.
... Across disciplines, the focus is on engaging communities who are oppressed in creating social change, such as Native American and Indigenous peoples (Cueva, Kuhnley, Revels, Schoenberg, & Dignan, 2015;de la Garza, 2016;Eglinton, Gubrium, & Wexler, 2017), GLBTQIA communities (Vivienne, 2011;Vivienne & Burgess, 2013), immigrants and refugees (Lenette, Cox, & Brough, 2015;Syed, Fish, Hicks, Kathawalla, & Lee, 2019), as well as other underserved and vulnerable populations (Martin, McLean, Brooks, & Wood, 2019;Palacios et al., 2015). DST research projects have examined topics of clear interest to counseling psychologists, including identity (Couros et al., 2013;Gray, Oré de Boehm, Farnsworth, & Wolf, 2010;Vivienne, 2011), trauma and healing (Beltrán & Begun, 2014;Palacios, 2012), health (Cueva et al., 2013;Gray et al., 2010), and education (Eglinton et al., 2017;Lawrence & Paige, 2016). At the center of this research is empowering individuals to share about their experiences and inviting them to be part of the research process-core tenets of participatory research. ...
Article
While counseling psychologists made substantial proposals to advance qualitative research since the special issue on related methods was published 15-years ago (Haverkamp, Morrow, & Ponterotto, 2005), the field continues to demonstrate an overreliance on quantitative methods. Though important for producing knowledge we can depend on, excessive use of these methods poses a barrier for counseling psychologists to address the needs of the communities that are at the core of our discipline's values-those who are marginalized and underserved in society. In alignment with our values of social justice, advocacy, and empowerment, we propose counseling psychologists adopt a methodology within a critical paradigm to better address issues of inequality and inequity when working with underrepresented communities, such as digital storytelling. Rooted in a movement to increase access to art for marginalized communities in the 1970s and 1980s, digital storytelling is an arts-based research methodology that captures first-person narrated accounts of peoples' lives through the use of stories, photos, and videos, and empowers communities to be a part of research to create social change. We provide recommendations for using digital storytelling in counseling psychology research as outlined through 5 phases, including Phase I) digital storytelling's critical paradigm, Phase II) project development, Phase III) implementation, Phase IV) data analysis, and Phase V) dissemination. While doing so, we draw on examples from 2 digital storytelling projects we are familiar with, Immigrant Stories and OrigiNatives, providing a framework for a digital frontier in counseling psychology research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).
... In adult learning, personal stories can be used to make content more interesting. Most importantly, digital storytelling has the potential to involve learners as knowledge creators in the learning process, rather than passive receivers of information [27]. ...
Article
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In human culture, storytelling is a long-established tradition. The reasons people tell stories are manifold: to entertain, to transfer knowledge between generations, to maintain cultural heritage, or to warn others of dangers. With the emergence of the digitisation of media, many new possibilities to tell stories in serious and non-entertainment contexts emerged. A very simple example is the idea of serious gaming, as in, digital games without the primary purpose of entertainment. In this paper, we introduce the term serious storytelling as a new potential media genre – defining serious storytelling as storytelling with a purpose beyond entertainment. We also put forward a review of existing potential application areas, and develop a framework for serious storytelling. We foresee several application areas for this fundamental concept, including wellbeing and health, medicine, psychology, education, ethical problem solving, e-leadership and management, qualitative journalism, serious digital games, simulations and virtual training, user experience studies, and online communication.
... Storytelling is highly participatory and interactive. Participants take turns giving feedback, raising clarifying questions and contributing to the story using their own recollections and interpretations [3,25,26]. This collaboration can develop children's socio-emotional skills when facilitated by adults who can encourage children to examine their emotions and related story events through guided questions, explanations and directives [3,11]. ...
Conference Paper
Storytelling can develop children's emotional intelligence when they are asked to freely talk about their emotions. While parents are responsible for teaching emotional intelligence, studies in using affective technologies to help people become aware of their emotions have also been explored. In this paper, we investigate the opportunity of this technology in enabling children to recognize and express their emotions. We describe a chatbot that leverages storytelling strategies to listen to children as they share emotional events they experienced, then guides them through reflective discipline to devise the next course of action. We report the types of emotions children choose to share with the chatbot, the kinds of support that the chatbot provided, the challenges during the conversation and children's perception of the chatbot. From our findings, we suggest design considerations for a conversation flow that anchors on storytelling to support child-agent interaction.
... Children learn effectively through story and storytelling, which enhances comprehension or story reading and improves language complexity (Isbell, Sobol, Lindauer, & Lowrance, 2004). The practice of teaching through story is a fundamental method that humans have used to teach and pass information through generations throughout human history (Lawrence & Paige, 2016) and is an essential strategy in teaching infants, especially in the classroom (Jalongo, 2004). Further, positive relationships between children's stories and the activities acted out in play (Holmes, et al., 2019) suggest stories leave an impressionable mark on a child and can influence how they behave socially. ...
Article
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Negative stereotypes about female intellectual abilities occur in children as young as 6-years-old and can shape a child's educational path and career choice, particularly in relation to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). The current study (N = 40) explored pre-existing gender stereotypes in a purposeful sample of 6 to 8-year-old white British girls at a dance and performing arts center and tested the impact of a brief story-based intervention that exposed young girls to intellectually brilliant female role models in STEM. Findings indicated that exposure to stories about women in science can help counter negative stereotypes concerning female intellectual ability. Another stereotype, “females are nicer than males”, was prevalent in most participants and was not affected by the current intervention. A key implication of this study is that young girls who learn about members of their own gender group who accomplished success in STEM fields may be more inclined to think of STEM careers as a possibility for females in future.
... ISSN 1948-5476 2020 Even though the social story intervention was developed by Carol Gray in 1993, learning through stories and storytelling is not a new concept. On the contrary, storytelling has been part of all Indigenous cultures since the first humans inhabited the earth (Lawrence & Paige, 2016; see also Heath, 1983;Underwood, 2002). People around the world tell and listen to stories, regardless of age, gender, or culture. ...
Article
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Deficits in social interactions is one of the characteristics of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). There are numerous interventions that aim at establishing social skills--social stories being one of them. This review of professional literature focuses on the effectiveness of social stories on social skills of elementary-aged students with ASD. The authors identified nine peer-reviewed journal articles from the systemic review of three search engines and analyzed them through different categorizations that provide information on the methodologies used, effectiveness of social stories, the implementation of social stories, and demographic information provided on participants. Effectiveness and implementation of social stories were characterized by a large variability of findings. Effectiveness ranged from lasting behavior changes to no measurable change at all. Implementation differed regarding the mode of presentation, the use of guidelines for developing the stories, setting and reader, and other intervention strategies implemented alongside. The authors identified disparities regarding gender and racial/ethnic identity across studies, with a majority of participants being male and a lack of information concerning the racial/ethnic identity of participants. The potential gender and racial/ethnic/cultural bias needs to be addressed in further research to ensure that findings can be generalized to a larger and representative population.
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El aprendizaje de los valores establecidos en la sociedad actual es vital para el crecimiento del individuo de manera amoldada a lo que hoy prima en la comunidad en la que vive. Su instrucción está supeditada a una formación previa, la cual se inicia en la etapa de Educación Infantil. Por otra parte, la enseñanza en este nivel se apoya en la lectura de cuentos tradicionales, los cuales tiene una gran representación de los valores socialmente aceptados hoy, de ahí que la educación en valores cobre una gran relevancia y sea necesario un estudio en este nivel escolar. Mediante un estudio ex post facto, empleando un diseño descriptivo y uno compa-rativo-causal, se presenta la opinión de los maestros y docentes en preservicio de esta etapa académica de la provincia de Córdoba (N = 441), en torno a si el valor de la cooperación y/o ayuda mutua puede ser aprendido por los niños, a través de los cuentos y del empleo de metodologías tradicionales. Mediante la aplicación de un cuestionario creado ad hoc conformado por 19 cuentos y 5 valores, atendiendo a la clasificación realizada por Marín y Sánchez (2015), y empleando una escala de respuesta tipo Likert, donde 1 equivalía a totalmente en desacuerdo y 5 a totalmente en desacuerdo, se procedió a la recogida de los datos. El principal resultado alcan-zado es que los docentes más jóvenes consideran que todos los cuentos trabajados en la enseñanza infantil (19) son válidos para aprender dicho valor. En consecuencia, cabe preguntarse si la falta de experiencia profesional puede ser un elemento que determine el empleo de metodologías tradicionales para el aprendizaje de este valor en particular y de todos en general.
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Stories can contribute to the emotional well-being of children and story-telling is one of the new methods of teaching in the classroom. The main objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of integrating digital Storytelling on the level of social intelligence and emotional intelligence in female elementary school students. In this quasi-experimental study, all third grade female elementary school students who were studying in an elementary school in Shiraz were involved based on the census method (N = 60). A quantitative approach was taken and the levels of social intelligence and emotional intelligence were examined in all participants before the training. Tromso social intelligence scale and Baron emotional intelligence inventory were used to measure the respondents' social and emotional intelligence. Simple random sampling was performed and the participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group in which digital Storytelling was integrated with group discussion (N = 30) or a control group in which there was no intervention (N = 30) using the random allocation software. The results showed that ABOUT THE AUTHOR
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Aunque la educación a distancia ha demostrado sus beneficios en el proceso de enseñanza, una de sus principales carencias es la falta de estrategias propias; sin embargo, la gamificación se considera como una herramienta efectiva para trabajar en esta modalidad. Por ello, se realizó una investigación de enfoque cuantitativo, de alcance exploratorio del tipo preexperimental en una universidad mexicana con los siguientes objetivos: identificar el nivel de incidencia que tienen las estrategias de gamificación en el aprendizaje colaborativo en un curso a distancia desde la perspectiva del estudiantado universitario; y comprobar si existen diferencias significativas entre las diferentes estrategias de gamificación en el aprendizaje colaborativo del estudiantado universitario. Se utilizó un curso a distancia donde se emplearon tres estrategias de gamificación (Tríada PET, Digital StoryTelling y Escape Room); el alumnado contestó el instrumento COLLES al finalizar cada una de estas para contrastar las respuestas obtenidas, por lo que se compararon las medias, desviaciones estándar y la ANOVA de un factor para muestras repetidas. Los resultados indicaron que las tres estrategias incidieron en el aprendizaje colaborativo, aunque existieron diferencias significativas en sus escalas. Se concluye que las características de cada estrategia son determinantes para lograr el aprendizaje colaborativo en línea. Se recomienda seleccionar y articular las estrategias de gamificación en el diseño de un curso a distancia y realizar mediciones constantes para identificar y mantener los niveles de aprendizaje colaborativo.
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Background: Little is known about the teaching and learning implications of instructional storytelling (IST) in nursing education or its potential connection to nursing theory. Method: The literature establishes storytelling as a powerful teaching-learning method in the educational, business, humanities, and health sectors, but little exploration exists that is specific to nursing. Results: An example of a story demonstrating application of the domains of Tanner's clinical judgment model links storytelling with learning outcomes appropriate for the novice nursing student. Conclusion: Application of Tanner's clinical judgment model offers consistency of learning experience while preserving the creativity inherent in IST. Further research into student learning outcomes achievement using IST is warranted as a step toward establishing best practices with IST in nursing education. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):305-308.].
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Thesis
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada’s recent report on Indigenous PostSecondary Education reported that 10% of Indigenous peoples in Canada hold a university degree, compared to 26% of non-Indigenous people. Yet, Indian and Northern Affairs (2011) contend that education is key to future employment and income for Indigenous peoples. To address this gap, some post-secondary institutions in Canada provide access programs for Indigenous students. This thesis explored access programs within four postsecondary institutions in Canada. I asked how educators viewed their roles in providing academic, cultural, and personal support for Indigenous student success in these programs. The methodology used was Indigenous Métissage (Donald, 2009) with a desire-based framework (Tuck, 2009). Methods were interviews with educators using conversation method (Kovach, 2009). Four themes emerged: 1) Building and maintaining relationships, 2) Responding to the whole student, 3) Empowering students, and 4) Student success in access programs. The findings reflected educators’ multiple roles within access programs and evoked wise practices (Wesley-Esquimaux & Calliou, 2010), which informed data analysis. Educators’ practices illuminated relationality with students in access programs through locally and culturally responsive practices that strove to balance student needs with university requirements. Conclusions and recommendations follow. This study contributes educators’ perspectives on relationality and success for Indigenous students in access programs in Canada
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This chapter discusses children’s imaginative play and literacy practices as mediated by mobile digital technologies and media. In this chapter, drawing on sociocultural theory and the notion of dynamic literacies, we consider how digital technologies including mobile technologies interact and potentially expand children’s imaginative play, leading to dynamic literacy practices and learning opportunities. Based on this understanding, we will propose some pedagogical principles that can be applied to play-based early childhood education in support of young children’s creative thinking, storytelling and dynamic literacy practices, both indoors and outdoors.
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This paper presents a critical interpretive synthesis of 53 articles describing the pedagogical use of madness/‘mental illness’ autobiographical narratives in postsecondary education. Focusing on instructor intentions and representations of student learning outcomes, findings indicate that narratives are most commonly used as ‘learning material’ to engage students in active learning, cultivate students’ empathy, complement dominant academic/professional knowledges, illustrate abstract concepts and provide ‘real’-life connections to course content. This paper contributes to a conversation across the intellectual traditions of Mad studies, medical humanities, educational research, stigma reduction and service user involvement to interrogate pedagogical uses of autobiographical narratives that remain in uncritical educational terms rather than as a matter of justice for Mad communities. While teaching with narratives will not inevitably result in social justice outcomes, thoughtful engagement with the ethical and epistemological considerations raised throughout this review may increase this possibility by shifting when, why and how we teach with autobiography.
Chapter
The opening chapter seeks to establish the specific attributes of fictional narratives that make them a powerful resource for developing professionals for a world in which the ability to imagine alternatives, reinvent roles, build networks and relationships, and operate within both virtual and physical environments has become critical. It does this by beginning to develop a unifying theoretical framework for the use of fiction to teach in professional contexts, drawing on literary theory, critical social theory and psychology. The framework is designed to help educators understand why and how fiction supports professional education and to provide explanatory and theoretical frameworks to justify the use of fictions in contexts in which the use of fiction might be less well understood, even dismissed as trivial.
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The purpose of this article was to evaluate the contribution to the social and emotional well-being of rural women of a 3-day songwriting workshop. Six participants wrote songs and performed these locally and at the Women of the World Festival. Guided by narrative inquiry and transformative learning theory, this case study included data from reflective journals, one-on-one interviews, and written songs. Vignettes of the women’s key life moments were constructed and analyzed thematically. Four themes were identified: the importance and influence of personal experiences on songwriting, learning from process and one another, intrapersonal benefits, and interpersonal benefits. The article argued songwriting workshops provide opportunities for participants to reflect on experiences and to transform their worldviews. That is, songs and the songwriting process can help participants to restory their lives and enhance their sense of social and emotional well-being.
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The present article is the result of an investigation to verify if the gamification strategies in a distance learning course at the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán (UADY) are considered as innovative educational practices, according to the elements of its educational model, and to verify the relevance of these strategies through the students’ perception. The course was developed through an instructional design model using three basic gamification strategies (storytelling, escape room and “PBL”). Students’ reflective journals were used to assess these strategies, as well as their comments in the discussion forums. It was found that the characteristics of UADY’s educational model allow the development of innovative strategies such as gamification and, on the other hand, students reported having experiences such as new ways of learning and developing behaviors such as motivation and teamwork. These findings are consistent with the literature and generate positive perspectives for the development of gamification in distance education at the university level.
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Background: Storytelling in nursing pedagogy is widely used and generally thought to be effective, but the mechanisms by which it is effective are unclear. This project explored whether watching a professional film affected students' knowledge, beliefs, or attitudes, and whether the extent of any change varied with the amount of narrative transportation (cognitive and emotional engagement in story) experienced. Method: Eighty-eight students watched the film Wit, took a knowledge pretest and posttest, and completed an instrument to measure narrative transportation. Analysis included t test, correlation, and regression. Results: Increases in pretest-posttest scores were significant, and a statistically significant, moderate, positive correlation between students' scores for narrative transportation and the amount of change in test scores. Narrative transportation explained significant variance in posttest scores and score change. Conclusion: Narrative transportation seems to enhance learning and might be a mechanism by which learning occurs. [J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(8):470-474.].
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Drawing upon two research studies using life history interviews to explore the learning trajectories of traditionally published fiction authors, this paper focuses on the selective and layered level of storytelling that occurs in life history research; before, during, after, and beyond the interview process. Various aspects of stories that authors choose to share about their lives are explored, as well as how this complex process of storying one's life compares to the process of crafting a fictional novel. In focusing on the research process, the role of the researcher as well as the participant in shaping the stories that get told is also considered. Biographical research with authors can be seen as a layered process, where at many levels decisions are made, consciously or unconsciously, that shape the stories which are shared. The analysis explores the complexity of using a life history approach, whilst pointing to valuable insights that can be discerned into the human processes of learning through this kind of research. Drawing upon a critical feminist theoretical perspective, the paper concludes by examining factors that affect the analysis and writing processes, ultimately shaping how stories may be crafted and shared by writers in life history research.
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This article addresses how critical race theory can inform a critical race methodology in education. The authors challenge the intercentricity of racism with other forms of subordination and exposes deficit-informed research that silences and distorts epistemologies of people of color. Although social scientists tell stories under the guise of “objective” research, these stories actually uphold deficit, racialized notions about people of color. For the authors, a critical race methodology provides a tool to “counter” deficit storytelling. Specifically, a critical race methodology offers space to conduct and present research grounded in the experiences and knowledge of people of color. As they describe how they compose counter-stories, the authors discuss how the stories can be used as theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical tools to challenge racism, sexism, and classism and work toward social justice.
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Full-text available
This article addresses how critical race theory can inform a critical race methodology in education. The authors challenge the intercentricity of racism with other forms of subordination and exposes deficit-informed research that silences and distorts epistemologies of people of color. Although social scientists tell stories under the guise of “objective” research, these stories actually uphold deficit, racialized notions about people of color. For the authors, a critical race methodology provides a tool to “counter” deficit storytelling. Specifically, a critical race methodology offers space to conduct and present research grounded in the experiences and knowledge of people of color. As they describe how they compose counter-stories, the authors discuss how the stories can be used as theoretical, methodological, and pedagogical tools to challenge racism, sexism, and classism and work toward social justice.
This article explores dance as a way of knowing, inquiry, embodied understanding and, ultimately, what it can mean to think on our feet and get our feet in our thinking.
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This article explores the characteristics, goals, modes of transmission, teaching and learning strategies of indigenous African education, in which the pursuit of excellence and quality has always been an important aim. Informal and vocational training constitute the core of indigenous education in Africa. Under this traditional system, each person in the community is practically trained and prepared for his/her role in society. It is a holistic system, in which story telling, proverbs and myths also play an important role. The author suggests the adoption of some of the elements of this system into modern-day educational practice as a strategy for improving quality.
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