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Synergy management at knowledge locations

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Abstract

This chapter described and analysed four contemporary management approaches to promote synergy at knowledge locations (science parks, campuses, knowledge quarters etc.): designing for interaction, managing the tenant mix, sharing facilities and promoting networks and communities. We explored and exemplified how the managers of six European knowledge locations implemented these synergy management approaches in their sites. The extant literatures argue that knowledge locations should not be seen a priori as “Marshallian utopias”: co-location per se does not to provide a fast track to synergy formation. Nevertheless both recent studies as well as our evidence suggest that knowledge locations can offer synergetic effects/possibilities, and synergy management tools can enhance those synergies. In other words, whilst co-location is not sufficient, synergy management can help. https://books.google.nl/books?id=e71hCQAAQBAJ&pg=PT77&lpg=PT77&dq=making+21th+century+complexes+van+winden&source=bl&ots=O8fb7gU-hV&sig=sGPa4lFfQ1vf9oEmVQgSOD20jNQ&hl=nl&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjFm4eN6JPLAhWG_SwKHfj1Dj8Q6AEIMDAD#v=onepage&q=making%2021th%20century%20complexes%20van%20winden&f=false

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