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Learning to Contradict and Standing Up for the Company: An Exploration of the Relationship Between Organizational Dissent, Organizational Assimilation, and Organizational Reputation

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Abstract

This study explored relationships between organizational assimilation, organizational reputation, and organizational dissent. Survey data collection using standard instruments was conducted with a sample of employees drawn from three countries (the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia). Analysis revealed that the expression of dissent to management and to coworkers was significantly and positively correlated with both organizational assimilation and organizational reputation. In particular, findings suggest that employees who reported being more socialized within their respective organizations also expressed more dissent to managers and to coworkers. Similarly, employees who reported perceiving their organizations as more ethical and reputable were more likely to express dissent to managers and coworkers. Additional analyses indicated that the relationships identified between variables were immune to the effects of organizational tenure and national culture. In particular, the results show that organizational assimilation is a key determinant of organizational dissent and that organizational reputation is a key reason that employees express it.

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... However, research has found organizational assimilation is signi cantly positively related to the frequency of upward dissent (Croucher et al., 2019;Kassing, 1997), implying more assimilated members in an organization are more likely to have better understanding of norms and attitudes of expressing dissent in organizations. Such organizational members tend to be more informative and re ective of previous dissent cases of other organizational members (Croucher et al., 2019). ...
... However, research has found organizational assimilation is signi cantly positively related to the frequency of upward dissent (Croucher et al., 2019;Kassing, 1997), implying more assimilated members in an organization are more likely to have better understanding of norms and attitudes of expressing dissent in organizations. Such organizational members tend to be more informative and re ective of previous dissent cases of other organizational members (Croucher et al., 2019). Thus, they become more strategic in choosing upward dissent strategies in terms of face mitigation and competency. ...
... Thus, we suspect that more assimilated employees are more likely to have mutual face and other-face concern respectively. Research has indicated that employees with stronger assimilation tend to use more articulated dissent (Croucher et al., 2019;Kassing, 1998) 2016), and are more engaged in and identi ed with their organizations (Goldman and Myers, 2015). Thus, we put forward that assimilation positively relates to articulated dissent. ...
Article
Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between face concerns, articulated (upward) dissent and organizational assimilation. In this study, articulated dissent was conceptualized as a type of dissent. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire was distributed to 370 working adults in the USA via Qualtrics. The questionnaire measured five face concerns, namely, self, other and mutual-face, articulated dissent and organizational assimilation. Before hypothesis testing, each measure was subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis to ensure that the hypothesized factor structure held. Pearson correlation and ordinary least squares estimation were used to test the hypotheses. Findings Conceptualizing dissent as a type of conflict, the findings of the current study are as follows: self-face and assimilation are positively correlated, other-face and assimilation are positively correlated, mutual-face and assimilation are positively correlated, assimilation and articulated dissent are positively correlated and organizational assimilation mediated the relationship between mutual-face and articulated dissent. Research limitations/implications Theoretically, the self-presentation process (face) is more critical as a person becomes part of an organization; it is through assimilating into an organization that members become familiar with the norms of an organization and more comfortable dissenting to their superiors (articulated dissent); and the more the authors integrate with the work colleagues the more the authors engage in mutual face-saving. Practical implications The results of this study demonstrate that self-presentation is critical as a person becomes part of an organization, particularly when it comes to managing conflict. Originality/value This is the first study to link facework with organizational dissent. The results add to the understanding of how face affects whether we choose to express this kind of conflict behavior.
... The reputation of an organization is built by stakeholders, such as customers, proprietors, personnel, and others. A good reputation is considered to be an important long-term asset that delivers many benefits to the organization, including ease of attracting and retaining professional personnel and elevating customer perceptions of the organization's goods and services (Croucher et al., 2019). OR management requires an ability to understand the business environment and track and respond to marketplace modifications in the right manner, additionally, it requires customer-oriented strategy, and a clear, vision and strategy to recognize and respond to consumer needs (Esther et al., 2017). ...
... Variance Inflation Factor was used to insure that there is no high correlation and linear interference between the dimensions, the results are as shown in Table (3), which shows that all values of VIF were greater than (1) and less than (10), however all the values of Tolerance Greater than (0.05). This indicated that there is no linear correlation between the dimensions of the independent variable (Sekaran and Bougie, 2010). ...
... Table (10) shows the results of the simple regression analysis of customer satisfaction in OR, it was found that there is a significant impact between the two variables where the value of Sig. (0.00), which is less than the percentage of (0.05). ...
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This study aimed to investigate the impact of customer relationship management (CRM) on enhancing the organizational reputation (OR) of Jordanian insurance companies. The study is based on four dimensions to measure CRM: customer reaction, customer knowledge, customer value, and customer satisfaction. Organizational reputation was measured by three dimensions: innovation, quality of service, and social responsibility. The descriptive-analytical method was used to achieve the study objectives, and a questionnaire was used to collect the needed data. Numerous statistical methods were used, the most important of which were simple and multiple regression coefficients. The results indicated that there are high levels of CRM and OR in Jordanian insurance companies. They also showed a significant impact of CRM on OR. The researcher recommends that Jordanian insurance companies should reflect their positive image and reputation to their employees to transfer this to their social environment. Furthermore, they should work with the principle of benchmarking to be aware of the latest practices in CRM and their applications in a practical way.
... The ability to build a distinctive organizational reputation is one of the pillars on which companies rely in achieving differentiation and superiority under the conditions of great competition in the work environment, where the organizational reputation is an outcome of the organization's dealings with customers and the surrounding community. Organizational reputation appears in the form of indicators such as trust, respect, and awareness towards the company (Croucher et al., 2019;Meynhardt et al., 2019;Kitchin et al., 2020). ...
... This is in addition to its role in retaining distinguished employees, the ability to attract the best talent, raising morale, and expansion in the work environment (Kingsley & Onuoha, 2019;Aula & Mantere, 2020;Waeraas & Dahle, 2020). Interestingly, the importance of organizational reputation lies in improving customer satisfaction and increasing their awareness and understanding of the products offered by companies (Croucher et al., 2019;Veh et al., 2019). It also contributes to preserving the company's resources and forming a network of relationships that support the success of the company. ...
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This study aimed to assess the impact of strategic renewal on both organizational identification and organizational reputation. It also aimed to explore the mediating role of organizational identification in the relationship between strategic renewal and organizational reputation in Egyptian travel agents. Partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) was employed to analyze the perceptions of 404 managers in Egyptian travel agents. The findings indicated that strategic renewal affects significantly and positively both organizational identification and organizational reputation. Moreover, organizational identification affects significantly and positively organizational reputation. The findings also showed that organizational identification plays a mediating role in enhancing the link between strategic renewal and organizational reputation in travel agents.
... Meanwhile, claiming another's ideas as one's own can be an unethical means to these advantageous outcomes. A growing body of work in business communication explores the nature of confronting unethical actions in the workplace (e.g., Croucher et al., 2019;Valde & Henningsen, 2015). This paper leverages these insights along with moral licensing theory to explain when and how employees confront one another over idea stealing and ignoring. ...
... Despite significant empirical advancements, studies have yet to explore how moral credentialing manifests itself in business communication patterns about ethical violations. While a paucity of business communication scholarship has explored moral credentialing, there is a growing body of work in business communication dedicated to exploring the confrontation of unethical actions Croucher et al., 2019;Valde & Henningsen, 2015). Understanding the business communication consequences of moral credentialing holds the promise of explaining how moral licensing dynamics become culturally normative in a workplace. ...
Article
How and when do employees confront one another for stealing their ideas? Business communication literature on confronting unethical behavior is synthesized with moral licensing theory to better understand responses to unethical actors about unjustified credit taking in the workplace. In this message production experiment, working adults ( N = 344) were randomly assigned to respond to a supervisor, peer coworker, or subordinate who stole or ignored the participant’s intellectual contributions. Content and statistical analyses revealed subordinates were comparatively less direct when confronting bosses, suggesting third-party moral licensing and moral credentialing were measurable in communication patterns. Importantly, this dynamic was not attributable to perceptions of task interdependence. Instead, subordinates perceived the stealing or ignoring of their ideas to be less unethical than did bosses. Additionally, individuals whose ideas have been stolen in the workplace were less confrontational compared to those who have not. Thus, data suggest incremental acquiescence to this form of workplace wrongdoing, particularly when the transgressor holds high hierarchical status. Taken together, these data may explain how recognition for ideas tends to spread vertically to bosses (labeled here, vertical credit creep), which may function to reinforce established power arrangements and to perpetuate unjustified credit taking in the workplace.
... Thinking about a positive work event not only has the potential to lead to discovery and innovation but may also enhance employees' perception of the organization and the meaningfulness of their work (Frone, 2015). When perceiving a favorable organizational reputation, employees are motivated to use dissent to defend the corporate reputation from misconduct (Croucher et al., 2019). Past research has also demonstrated positive workplace relationships, and an open workplace climate is conducive to employee critical voices (Goldberg et al., 2011). ...
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Employees often spend a significant amount of time ruminating over their daily working experiences. Such rumination triggered by work events may have profound influences on employees’ behaviors and perceptions about their organization. The current study investigates how work rumination may alter employee dissent behaviors through the mediating role of organizational trust. Results from a sample of employees recruited through Qualtrics (N = 397) indicate that both positive and negative rumination leads to increased employee dissent. In addition, organizational trust is a significant mediator in the relationship between work rumination and articulated dissent. Findings of the current study suggest organizations need to take an active role in shaping employees’ everyday working experiences. Further implications and limitations are discussed.
... Organizational influences are related to employee's perception of their respective organization. Employees were more likely to voice upward dissent when they perceived a higher level of workplace freedom of speech (Croucher et al., 2014;Kassing, 2000a), when they were more assimilated in the organization (Croucher, Zeng, & Kassing, 2019), when they demonstrated higher level of organizational identification (Kassing, 2000a). Alongside the individual, relational, and organizational factors, a number of crosscultural studies argued employee's dissent decision is also influenced by one's socioeconomic status and perceived job security (Croucher et al., 2014. ...
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This study examines the extent to which the Organizational Dissent Scale (ODS) maintains validity and temporal stability over time in a French sample. A longitudinal panel study was conducted. The results do not support that the ODS maintains validity nor temporal stability over time. These results are not indicative of problems with the original measure; it could be that conceptually dissent is a different process with different understandings in French culture. Cultural differences may render measures unusable between cultural groups.
... Leakage of internal audit reports  By Internal Auditors  By non-Auditors Employees may be motivated to blow the whistle on unethical behavior in order to protect their organization, mostly when the organizations engender a reputation of integrity (Croucher et al., 2016) The presence of rational whistleblowing occurs if the government offers a reward to whistleblowers in order to encourage them to report the cases of tax management misconduct in their organizations (Kleven et al., 2016). Such whistle blowers acts are motivated by the monetary rewards or compensations. ...
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The objective of this study was to explore the various motivators behind leakage of internal audit reports in public sector in Kenya. Leakage of information was considered as a mild act of whistleblowing. This study made use of primary data obtained from 23 internal auditors randomly selected from the public sector. The relevant data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and also subjected to Pearson coefficient of correlation and multiple linear regression analysis techniques. The results obtained by the study indicate that there was a significant influence of staff dissatisfaction, compensation, reporting structures, policy framework, public protection and personal conviction on information leakage in the public sector in Kenya. However, reputation, management commitment and accountability enforcement were found to be insignificant motivators behind information leakage.
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Applying the new economics of organization and relational theories of the firm to the problem of understanding cross‐national variation in the political economy, this volume elaborates a new understanding of the institutional differences that characterize the ‘varieties of capitalism’ found among the developed economies. Building on a distinction between ‘liberal market economies’ and ‘coordinated market economies’, it explores the impact of these variations on economic performance and many spheres of policy‐making, including macroeconomic policy, social policy, vocational training, legal decision‐making, and international economic negotiations. The volume examines the institutional complementarities across spheres of the political economy, including labour markets, markets for corporate finance, the system of skill formation, and inter‐firm collaboration on research and development that reinforce national equilibria and give rise to comparative institutional advantages, notably in the sphere of innovation where LMEs are better placed to sponsor radical innovation and CMEs to sponsor incremental innovation. By linking managerial strategy to national institutions, the volume builds a firm‐centred comparative political economy that can be used to assess the response of firms and governments to the pressures associated with globalization. Its new perspectives on the welfare state emphasize the role of business interests and of economic systems built on general or specific skills in the development of social policy. It explores the relationship between national legal systems, as well as systems of standards setting, and the political economy. The analysis has many implications for economic policy‐making, at national and international levels, in the global age.
Article
While there is widespread support for the notion that organizations with better reputations outperform their rivals, there is uncertainty about how to create such a reputation, especially among the managers responsible for this task For example, organizations often give money to worthy causes or create social responsibility programs in the hope that this will appeal to their stakeholders. When approaches such as these are only loosely coupled to the strategy of the organization they appear to be "bolted on" rather than "built in." Thus, they are likely to foster a reputation that is less consistent with the principal actions of the organization and be less credible. They are also easy for competitors to imitate. Because of this, a reputation grounded in the strategy of the organization has a better chance of providing a sustainable competitive advantage. We present a normative framework that illustrates a strategy-led approach to reputation building. It is illustrated with numerous corporate examples.
Chapter
Cross-cultural studies are necessary for the complete development of theories in environmental research since no one culture contains all environmental conditions that can affect human behavior. Likewise, no one country contains all possible types of man-made changes of the physical environment, nor all of the man-made adaptations to natural conditions such as climate, noise, air quality, and potential hazards. In addition, many places in which environmental researchers might be asked to work are in parts of the world where “development” is seen as a necessity or at least a desideratum. These places are often in countries where empirical research is not a well-established entity, hence the necessity for importing advisers from other countries. Although frequently forgotten (Fahvar & Milton, 1972), environmental assessments prepared by such advisers should include analyses of how a development project will affect a culture and even the behavior of people for whom the project was designed.
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This study investigated the relationship between organizational assimilation and the three types of employee dissent (i.e., upward, lateral, displaced). Participants were 186 full-time employees who completed a brief online self-report survey. Results of the study revealed that all seven dimensions of organizational assimilation (i.e., familiarity with coworkers, familiarity with supervisors, acculturation, recognition, involvement, job competency, role negotiation) were related positively to upward dissent, while two dimensions of assimilation (i.e., acculturation, involvement) were related negatively to lateral dissent. No significant relationships existed between the dimensions of organizational assimilation and displaced dissent.
Article
Little empirical work has been completed on the whistleblowing process in organizations. This study examines questionnaire data from 72 respondents who blew the whistle on their employers with regard to alleged sex discrimination. Results indicate that whistleblowers considered the process to be more effective when their cases were determined to have merit and when they felt they had succeeded in changing management's attitudes. Retaliation by employer had little influence on whether the whistleblower considered the process to be effective. Further, retaliation was less likely to occur when the whistleblower's case was determined to have merit.
Article
Previous research on organizational dissent has explored a number of issues, but that research has been overly focused on the dissenter while neglecting the active role of others in co-constructing dissent. That line of scholarship has also tended to examine dissent expressions in isolation rather than exploring how previous experiences shape present expectations. This essay redefines dissent to situate interaction centrally and to focus on dissent interactions over time as a process rather than a one-time event. The success or failure of dissent is conceptualized as part of that process. Such a perspective reveals nuances by including the stories and discourses that are told as part of and in addition to an initial dissent conversation. A case study demonstrates how this reconceptualization of dissent recognizes the primary importance of interaction in constituting organizations and advances process theory by explicating the value such a perspective adds to this context.
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The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which individual differences, in general, and aggressive communication traits, in particular, influenced employees’dissent strategy selections. Employees completed self-report instruments describing their levels of verbal aggressiveness, argumentativeness, and how they chose to express dissent concerning organizational practices and policies. Results indicated that argumentativeness, verbal aggressiveness, and organizational position predicted articulated and latent dissent use. Results also indicated that individual differences did not predict the use of displaced dissent.
Article
In this paper, I reconceptualize organizational dissent as the expression of disagreements and contradictory opinions that result from the experience of feeling apart from one's organization. Employees experience dissent when they recognize incongruence between actual and desired states of affairs. The theory of unobtrusive control (Tompkins & Cheney, 1985), the theory of independent‐mindedness (Garden & Infante, 1987; Infante & Gorden, 1987), and the Exit‐Voice‐Loyalty model of employee responses to dissatisfaction (Hirschman, 1970) provide the framework for a model of employee dissent. The proposed model incorporates four elements: (a) triggering agent; (b) strategy selection influences; (c) strategy selection; and (d) expressed dissent. Examining variations in employees’ expressions of dissent may contribute to our understanding of employee involvement practices, democratic organizational structures, and employee empowerment efforts.
Article
The purpose of this study was to extend research on the influence of the social identity and intimacy of relationship on interethnic communication in the United States to Australia and England. Data from Australia and England were used to test the generalizability of Gudykunst and Hammer's (1988) findings in the United States. They found that intimacy of the relationship affected uncertainty reduction processes in interethnic relationships. Further, their data indicated that social identity affected uncertainty reduction processes when the partner is perceived to be typical of his or her ethnic group, but not when he or she is perceived as atypical. Results for Australia and England revealed that intimacy of relationship has a significant positive effect on uncertainty reduction processes across cultures. With respect to social identity, the findings for England were consistent with the United States data, but results for Australia were not.
Article
Professional and ethical dissent by scientists and engineers is common; in a recent study 10% of engineers surveyed had objected to some work or practices in their organizations. The organizational world has begun to respond, albeit slowly, by recognizing that dissent is legitimate, even beneficial, and by providing mechanisms for the examination and resolution of it. Growing legal protection for dissenters supports this spirit of organizational renovation, although the law unfortunately relies on fairly slow administrative case processing. These trends offer a great opportunity for progress in the next decade.
Article
This study explores outcomes associated with circumvention (i.e., dissenting by going around or above one's supervisor). Employees completed a survey instrument in which they provided a dissent account detailing a time when they practiced circumvention. Several themes regarding relational and organizational outcomes emerged from an interpretive analysis of the data. Circumvention resulted predominantly in relational deterioration with one's supervisor, but in many cases it led to neutrality, compromise, relationship development, and understanding. Although organizational-level outcomes most often produce results that are favorable for dissenters, they also include triggering agent sanctions, organizational improvement, absence of corrective action, and disadvantageous outcomes for the dissenter.
Article
Previous researchers have considered the nature of dissent as well as the audiences to whom employees express dissent. Absent in these treatments is a specific focus on the actual dissent strategies that employees use. The purpose of this study was to assess strategies employees use to express upward dissent within contemporary organizations. Employees completed a survey instrument that asked them to provide a dissent account. Five distinct strategies emerged from an interpretive thematic analysis of the accounts. Results indicated that employees used direct-factual appeal, repetition, solution presentation, circumvention, and threatening-resignation strategies for expressing upward dissent.
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine how the nature of dissenttriggering events influenced to whom employees chose to express dissent. This was accomplished by asking respondents to report the frequency with which they expressed upward dissent to managers and supervisors, lateral dissent to coworkers, and displaced dissent to people external to their organizations (i.e., family and nonwork friends) in response to different dissent-triggering events. Structural equation models were employed. Results revealed that employeeswere more likely to express dissent to supervisors and coworkers about issues related to their coworkers and about organizational functions such as decision making and organizational change than they were to express dissent about ethical practices and preventing harm to employees. Employees did not appear to differentiate the amount of dissent they expressed to people outside of their organizations as a function of dissent-triggering events.
Article
This study considered the degree to which employees' current and past work experiences related to employees' expressions of upward dissent. A sample of full-time working adults completed a survey questionnaire that assessed workplace freedom of speech, current job tenure, employment history, and upward dissent. Findings indicated that perceptions of workplace freedom of speech and current job tenure related to upward dissent about other-focused issues, that employment history related to upward dissent about functional issues, and that perceptions of workplace freedom of speech and employment history related to upward dissent about protective issues.
Article
Today's complex and decentralized organization gives rise to organizational needs for both loyalty and institutionalized whistle blowing. However, ethicists see a contradiction between both needs. This paper argues there is no such contradiction. It shows why earlier attempts to go beyond the dilemma are not satisfying. The solution proposed in this paper starts from an organizational perspective instead of an individual one. It does so by reframing the concept of loyalty into “rational loyalty”. This means that the object of loyalty is not the physicality of an organization, but its corpus of explicit mission statement, goals, value statement and code of conduct. An implication is that organizations are – as their side of the duty of loyalty – obliged to institutionalize whistle blowing.
Article
This study explores how employees accounted for their engagement in circumvention (i.e., dissenting by going around or above one's supervisor). Employees completed a survey instrument in which they provided a dissent account detailing a time when they chose to practice circumvention. Results indicated that employees accounted for circumvention through supervisor inaction, supervisor performance, and supervisor indiscretion. In addition, findings revealed how employees framed circumvention in ways that enhanced the severity and principled nature of the issues about which they chose to dissent.
Article
The general trend toward more democratic forms of organizing highlights the necessity to consider how employees engage their organizations in participative environments. Assessing employee dissent represents one means of understanding the dialogue between employee and employer. The purpose of this study was to develop a measure for operationalizing how employees verbally express their contradictory opinions and disagreements about organizational phenomena. The Organizational Dissent Scale (ODS) was developed and tested in a series of studies designed to generate evidence of validity and reliability for the measure. Results indicate that the scale measures how employees express dissent along three dimensions: articulated, antagonistic (latent), and displaced. Results also indicate that initial evidence of validity and reliability exists for the scale.
Article
This study examined the relationship between employees' perceptions of justice within their organizations and their tendencies for expressing dissent. A sample of full-time working adults (N = 141) completed a survey instrument. Results indicated that managers' perceptions of justice related positively to their use of upward dissent and negatively to their use of displaced dissent, and that non-managers' perceptions of justice related negatively to their use of latent and displaced dissent. Overall, the findings suggest that although managers and non-managers respond differently to perceptions of justice, how fair employees perceive organizational decision-making practices to be relates to their dissent expression.
Article
Until the 1980s, employment relations in Australia had four features: compulsory arbitration; restricted immigration; a subsidised manufacturing sector; and, unions with high degrees of legitimacy and a successful representative political party. These elements made the Australian approach different from that of the USA where employment relations has been more influenced by free-market capitalism. Since the 1980s, Australia has been deregulating its labor market, emphasising workplace negotiation over arbitration, abolishing industry protection, marginalising unions, using productivity improvement as a basis for remuneration and, more recently, encouraging individualism in workplace bargaining. These trends are interpreted as adoption of an US-style approach. The extent of this phenomenon is examined with reference to change in Australia's philosophical orientation and ideology, and changes in certain of its labor market/employment relations outcomes. The US experience is used as a model for understanding how Australia is changing and what employment relations outcomes it can expect. Theories addressing individualism vis-à-vis employment relations and globalisation/convergence are used to establish context for the Australia/USA comparison. However these ideas are revealed as incomplete in their capacity to explain how and why the two countries are becoming more similar in their approaches.
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of employee burnout syndrome on organizational dissent. Two hundred nine employees from various organizations in the midwestern United States participated. Results indicated employees who report high levels of emotional exhaustion, feelings of failure, and isolation from fellow workers report low levels of articulated dissent and avoid using latent dissent. Displaced dissent did not significantly contribute to the equation.
Article
Research on organizational dissent is important given the implications and potential repercussions for employees and employers. The present research conceptualized dissent in terms of employee voice and organizational influence. An instrument to measure the content of dissent messages was developed, and factor analyses indicated 11 types of dissent messages. Results further indicated that messages of Solution Presentation, Direct-Factual Appeal, Coalitions, and Inspiration were more frequently used to express dissent, while messages of Pressure and Exchange were less frequently employed. The results refine understandings of dissent messages, an important step in giving employees more effective options for voice in the workplace.
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine how subordinates' perceptions of workplace freedom of speech related to their levels of organizational identification and their strategies for expressing dissent. Full‐time working adults from various organizations in the Southwest completed self‐report survey instruments. Results indicated that organizational identification as well as the expression of articulated dissent and latent dissent varied as a function of workplace freedom of speech.
Article
In this study, full-time employees were surveyed to determine the degree to which different considerations factored into their decisions to express upward or lateral dissent. Employees rated considerations similarly when reportedly dissenting to either supervisors or coworkers, with organizational climate and organizational attachment considerations being comparatively stronger than concerns associated with being perceived as adversarial and experiencing retaliation. A comparison across types of dissent revealed that organizational climate, organizational attachment, and adversarial perception/retaliation were more important considerations when employees expressed upward versus lateral dissent. Additionally, results suggested no significant differences in the way management and non-management employees weighed considerations when expressing dissent.
Article
The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between temporal and structural components of organizational life (i.e., job tenure, employment history, and organizational history) and employee dissent. This was accomplished by comparing respondents’ reports about their tendencies to use varying strategies for dissent to their reports about present job tenure, number of full‐time employers, total years work experience, and organizational status. Structural equation models were used to examine the association between temporal measures (job tenure, number of full‐time employers, total years work experience), structural measures (organizational status) and dissent constructs. Findings indicated that articulated dissent use was associated with management status, whereas latent dissent use was associated with nonmanagement status, increases in present job tenure and decreases in number of full‐time employers and total years work experience.
Article
Develops a model of principled organizational dissent after a review of literature in the social sciences, humanities, law and journalism. Propositions are derived from the model toward a program of research to estimate the magnitude of principled organizational dissent as a form of individual behavior in the workplace; identify and analyze factors affecting the causes and consequences of principled dissent; and suggest how principled dissent could be more effective as a stimulus for constructive organizational change. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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present an integrated and . . . heuristic discussion of the nature and functions of communication in the organizational entry, assimilation, and exit process vocational anticipatory socialization / organizational anticipatory socialization encounter / metamorphosis / communication-related outcomes communication as an antecedent of turnover / communication correlates of withdrawal / communication consequences of turnover (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Article
A number of recent accounts of UK social policy under New Labour have emphasised the continuing Americanisation of the British welfare state. This article does not deny the influence of the US but rather seeks to balance it with an account of the growing Europeanisation of UK social policy. It argues that Americanisation and Europeanisation are distinct in terms of both content and process. Since these are not mutually exclusive, the UK is currently influenced by both. This situation is illustrated by looking at three social policy issues under New Labour: social exclusion, the New Deal and the treatment of lone parents.
Article
ABSTRACT There is evidence from a variety of sources that employees often do not feel comfortable speaking to their bosses about organizational problems or issues that concern them. The purpose of this study was to shed light on the types of issues that employees are reluctant to raise, and identify why employees sometimes decide to remain silent rather than voice their concerns. We interviewed 40 employees and found that most had been in situations where they were concerned about an issue but did not raise it to a supervisor. Silence spanned a range of organizational issues, with several of our respondents indicating that they did not feel comfortable speaking to those above them about any issues or concerns. The most frequently mentioned reason for remaining silent was the fear of being viewed or labeled negatively, and as a consequence, damaging valued relationships. From our data, we develop a model of how the perceived consequences of voice contribute to silence, and a model of how the social and relational implications of speaking up can take away employees’ ability to have influence within an organizational setting.
Article
Good corporate reputations are critical because of their potential for value creation, but also because their intangible character makes replication by competing firms considerably more difficult. Existing empirical research confirms that there is a positive relationship between reputation and financial performance. This paper complements these findings by showing that firms with relatively good reputations are better able to sustain superior profit outcomes over time. In particular, we undertake an analysis of the relationship between corporate reputation and the dynamics of financial performance using two complementary dynamic models. We also decompose overall reputation into a component that is predicted by previous financial performance, and that which is ‘left over’, and find that each (orthogonal) element supports the persistence of above-average profits over time. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
Seven dimensions of organizational culture that influence the employee reflection process that ultimately leads to whistleblowing behavior are presented. These include 1) vigilance, 2) engagement, 3) credibility, 4) accountability, 5) empowerment, 6) courage, and 7) options. Key considerations within each dimension are discussed and a compliance framework is used to identify strategies for encouraging a culture that supports employee communication, questioning, and reporting of illegal, unethical, and illegitimate practices within organizations.
Article
Employees and corporate reputation are unique resources that generate positive financial performance and ultimately create sustainable competitive advantage. Corporate reputation is vital to the organization, and employees are the key link to managing it. By recognizing the synergistic role that employees can play in the overall positioning of corporate reputation, management can obtain significant achievements in terms of satisfying corporate strategic objectives. Initiatives essential to gain employee commitment to corporate reputation enhancement are examined, along with the use of the balanced scorecard to integrate corporate reputation metrics into the incentive system.