Article

Afrikaans - a beautiful language with a heavy historical burden

Authors:
To read the full-text of this research, you can request a copy directly from the author.

Abstract

Since the 'wind of change' blew over the Republic of South Africa Afrikaans has come under increasing pressure. No longer are Apartheid politicians in a position to impose their language on black South Africans who prefer to be taught and speak English. Afrikaans has never been a 'whites only' language. Early Boer patriots at the end of the 19(th) century, the language policies between 1910 and World War II and after the election victory of the National Party in 1948 create this impression. The whites wished to see their beloved language as a structural Germanic language closely related to Dutch. Lexical terms borrowed from the Khoekhoe and the Asian slaves enriched the new language, because it gave expression to the African environment and reality. This interpretation formed part of Apartheid policy, where the first white settlers were not only seen as planters of a new nation at the Cape but also as the founders of a new white Germanic language. New perspectives, stripped of Apartheid ideology, on Afrikaans history and language bring to light that the influence of Asian slaves and Cape Khoekhoe in the development of the new people had been belittled for many many years. Research results indicate that the term 'kitchen language' for Afrikaans is actually correct. The cradle of Afrikaans was the kitchens, the house, the barn, the field, the workplace where slaves and Khoekhoe had to communicate with each other with their white masters. Afrikaans in modern South Africa has to go back to its multinational roots and to accept this exciting heritage. Only then has Afrikaans the chance to survive in the country of the 'rainbow nation'.

No full-text available

Request Full-text Paper PDF

To read the full-text of this research,
you can request a copy directly from the author.

ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.