Article

The Relationship Between Personality, Coping Styles and Stress, Anxiety and Depression

Source: OAI
ABSTRACT
Our personality and the way we cope with stress are two factors that are important in the development of psychological distress. The current study explored the relationship between personality, coping styles and psychological distress in 201 students from the University of Canterbury. Participants completed the Temperament Character Inventory - Revised (TCI-R; Cloninger et al., 1994), the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS; S.H. Lovibond & P.F. Lovibond, 1995) and the Coping Orientation of Problem Experience (COPE; Carver, Scheier, Weintraub, 1989). The study showed that participants with high harm avoidance and low self-directedness reported increased stress, anxiety and depression, while low harm avoidance and high self-directedness appeared to be a protective factor against the development of distress. Avoidant coping was shown to be the most maladaptive coping style as it was associated with increased stress, anxiety and depression, while problem-focused coping appeared to reduce depressive symptoms. Strong associations were also found between personality and coping styles, as individuals with high reward dependence were more inclined to engage in emotion-focused coping, while high self-directed individuals engaged in more problem-focused coping. High harm avoidance was associated with avoidant coping, resulting in greater distress than either predictor alone. The current study suggests that our personality and the coping styles we employ may influence whether we experience stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, the association between personality and coping styles suggests that individuals with maladaptive personalities (e.g. high harm avoidance) are at a greater risk for experiencing psychological distress as they are more likely to use a maladaptive coping style such as avoidant coping.

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Available from: canterbury.ac.nz
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    • "A t-test not assuming homogeneity of variance was computed for both factors. The findings from another study revealed that females scored higher in Sentimentality (as a part of TCI) than males (Aluja et al., 2010, p. 398), but this scale measured sentimentality more as empathy, sensitivity and striving for help the others, making good for them (van Berkel, 2009). In accordance with the previous research findings were the gender differences in the answers of the different items as a part of the present study. "
    Dataset: 90-654-2-PB
    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    • "In this regard, Farahani (2009) found in his study that coping strategies reduced level of academic stress. Furthermore, literatures reported results similar to the present study (Foladvand, 2010; Ptacek, Smith & Zanas, 2003; McCarthy, Moller & Fouladi, 2001; Berkel, 2009; Crockett et al., 2007; Khan & Achour, 2011). But on the other hand, some study reported unlike results and are in contrast with the results of the current study (Samari, Laelifaz, & Asgari, 2006; Kline & Snoww, 2005). "
    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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    • "In this regard, Farahani (2009) found in his study that coping strategies reduced level of academic stress. Furthermore, literatures reported results similar to the present study (Foladvand, 2010; Ptacek, Smith & Zanas, 2003; McCarthy, Moller & Fouladi, 2001; Berkel, 2009; Crockett et al., 2007; Khan & Achour, 2011). But on the other hand, some study reported unlike results and are in contrast with the results of the current study (Samari, Laelifaz, & Asgari, 2006; Kline & Snoww, 2005). "
    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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