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Acoustics of poro-visco-elastic media: Experimental Techniques

Authors:
  • Mecanum Inc, and Université de Sherbrooke

Abstract and Figures

Open-cell porous materials are used for soundproofing and noise control. Engineers simulate their performance in different applications using state-of-the-art prediction software. To define these materials, up to ten (10) material properties are required following the Biot-Allard poroelasticity model. There are 6 non-acoustical parameters (open porosity, static airflow resistivity, tortuosity, viscous and thermal characteristic lengths, static thermal permeability), 1 physical property (in-vacuum bulk density), and 3 viscoelastic properties (Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, damping loss factor). This workshop is on the experimental techniques and good practices to accurately characterize the porous material properties.
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