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Buddhism in the Shadow of Brahmanism

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... Bonten 梵天(王)), como protector de las enseñanzas budistas (IBJ, 2014: 662). Por esto mismo, Sakka aparece en una gran cantidad de relatos jātaka, además de en muy variopintos contextos a lo largo del Canon, dejando entrever la intención de los editores de textos budistas en posicionar al buddha Gautama por encima de la religión védica (Bronkhorst, 2011a;2011b;Gombrich, 2013;Villamor, 2022c). En muchos relatos jātaka Sakka es identificado como una deidad que se conmueve por los actos generosos que se le atribuyen al bodhisattva, utilizándose este recurso retórico para legitimar precisamente su supuesta superioridad moral (Shaw, 2006: 44). ...
... Sharihotsu 舎利弗), y no del buddha Gautama (Konno, 1999: 388). 408 Bronkhorst, 1996Bronkhorst, , 2007Bronkhorst, , 2011a. 409 Jones, 1956: 76, nota 6. brahmánicas son citadas en el Mvu 3067 para exaltar las enseñanzas budistas dentro del paradigma religioso indio. ...
... Fragmentos del Sālikedāra-jātaka (Ja 484), recuperado desde University of Edinburgh (2021) el 17 de octubre de 2021. 294 Sobre la relación del budismo temprano con el brahmanismo remitimos a la lecturade Ellis, 2021, Bronkhorst, 2006, 2011a y Walser, 2018 ...
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