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Effect of gelatin-cystine and serenoa repens extract on free radicals level and hair growth

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The influence of gelatin-cystine and serenoa repens on hair growth was studied through a long period application (50 weeks) of a new cosmeceutical lotion. On 48 volunteers (24 women and 24 men) aged between 21 and 38 years, affected by androgenetic alopecia (type III and IV according to Hamilton). 12 subjects also took a diet supplement (4 pills per day) based on gelatin- cystine. The solution and the diet supplement (placebo and active) were assigned in a randomized double-blind manner. Hair mass and the mean hair number were controlled according to Price et al. Exclusion criteria included use of topical or oral drug or diet supplement within the previous six months. The obtained results showed an increase of hair mass from 20 to 30% (p<0.005) together with a contemporary increase of hair number (from 17 to 27%) (p<0.005) compared to the placebo for subjects using the lotion only. With the diet supplement a further increase of 50% (p<0.005) in hair growth and a significant decrease of blood ROS (Reactive Oxigen Species) were obtained.
... SP's antiandrogenic properties, minimal side-effect profile [16], and low drug interaction potential have prompted its use as a complementary alopecia remedy [1,16,17]. The extract has been evaluated for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) [18][19][20][21], telogen effluvium (TE) [22][23][24][25], seborrheic dermatitis [26,27], and facial sebum [28], as a monotherapy or in combination with other supplements, in oral and topical formulations. In this review, we will systematically describe SP extract's efficacy for the treatment of hair loss conditions and associated side effects. ...
... A systematic review was completed searching the National Library of Medicine through PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochran databases, without date limits, in January 2019, using the following terms: (saw palmetto and hair loss); (saw palmetto and androgenetic alopecia); (saw palmetto and natural supplement and alope- The above search generated 9 articles using oral and topical supplements containing SP, with a total of 381 patients, for the treatment of alopecia (Fig. 1). Four RCTs [18][19][20][21], 2 prospective cohort studies [24,29], and 1 case report [30] described the effects of topical or oral SP extract for the treatment of AGA. The efficacy of SP-containing products in treating TE was described in 2 case reports [25,30], 1 RCT [21], and 1 prospective cohort study [24] (Table 1). ...
... The use of topical SP and oral gelatin-cystine supplement caused a further increase of approximately 50% in all hair growth parameters (p < 0.005) when compared to use of either agent alone. Both topical SP and gelatincystine supplement were well tolerated, and no adverse events (AEs) were reported [18]. ...
Article
Saw palmetto (SP), a botanical extract with antiandrogenic properties, has gained commercial popularity for its purported benefits on hair regrowth. To summarize published evidence on the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of supplements containing SP in the treatment of alopecia, we conducted a PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane database search using the following terms: (saw palmetto and hair loss), (saw palmetto and androgenetic alopecia), and (saw palmetto and natural supplement and alopecia). Five randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and 2 prospective cohort studies demonstrated positive effects of topical and oral supplements containing SP (100–320 mg) among patients with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and telogen effluvium. Sixty percent improvement in overall hair quality, 27% improvement in total haircount, increased hair density in 83.3% of patients, and stabilized disease progression among 52% were noted with use of various topical and oral SP-containing supplements. SP was well tolerated and not associated with serious adverse events in alopecia patients. Although robust high-quality data are lacking, supplements containing SP may be a treatment option for patients with AGA, telogen effluvium, and self-perceived hair thinning. Further large-scale RCTs focusing on the sole contribution of SP to hair growth outcomes are needed to confirm efficacy and determine long-term adverse events.
... Both cystine and methionine have been shown to improve hair growth in AGA patients [14, 15••]. In 24 patients with AGA, oral administration of combined cystine, methionine, histidine, zinc, and copper led to a significant mean change in total hair count [14]. Millet seed, rich in sulfur containing amino acids like methionine and cysteine, used in combination with L-cystine and calcium pantothenate, produced a significant increase in anagen rate compared to baseline [16]. ...
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Purpose of Review Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the most common form of non-scarring alopecia, affecting millions of men and women in the United States (U.S.). This review highlights alternative and complementary treatment options for AGA. Recent Findings The treatment regimens for AGA have increased in pharmacotherapeutics, surgical, and complementary (CAM) categories. Each of the different treatment approaches can now be utilized by dermatologists to combat patient hair loss. Summary The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved only two agents to treat AGA: prescription-only, oral finasteride and over-the-counter (OTC), topical minoxidil. Increased availability of therapies claiming hair regrowth properties, coupled with limited pharmacotherapeutic options for AGA, lead patients to seek alternative treatments. Increased awareness of the current evidence supporting complementary and alternative therapies among dermatologists will facilitate appropriate and timely education of AGA patients.
... Oral administration of L-cystine (70 mg) used in combination with retinol increases both hair density and anagen rate [37]. The combination of L-cystine, histidine, and copper significantly increases the total hair count after 50 weeks in patients with AGA [38]. In summary, L-cysteine plays a central role in the maintaining of hair health. ...
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Abstract: Hair loss is a disorder in which the hair falls out from skin areas such as the scalp and the body. Several studies suggest the use of herbal medicine to treat related disorders, including alopecia. Dermal microcirculation is essential for hair maintenance, and an insu�cient blood supply can lead to hair follicles (HF) diseases. This work aims to provide an insight into the ethnohistorical records of some nutritional compounds containing flavonoids for their potential beneficial features in repairing or recovering from hair follicle disruption. We started from a query for “alopecia” OR “hair loss” AND “Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.“ (or other six botanicals) terms included in Pubmed and Web of Sciences articles. The activities of seven common botanicals introduced with diet (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey., Malus pumila Mill cultivar Annurca, Co�ea arabica, Allium sativum L., Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze, Rosmarinum o�cinalis L., Capsicum annum L.) are discussed, which are believed to reduce the rate of hair loss or stimulate new hair growth. In this review, we pay our attention on the molecular mechanisms underlying the bioactivity of the aforementioned nutritional compounds in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies. There is a need for systematic evaluation of the most commonly used plants to confirm their anti-hair loss power, identify possible mechanisms of action, and recommend their best adoption.
... Oral L-cystine (70 mg) in combination with retinol was evaluated for the treatment of diffuse alopecia, with increases seen in both hair density and anagen rate [9]. Oral L-cystine (unknown dose) was also studied in combination with histidine, copper, and zinc taken 4 times daily, resulting in a significant mean change in total hair count after 50 weeks (29 vs. 11% for placebo) in 24 patients with AGA [10]. Millet seed containing amino acids, silicic acid, several B vitamins, and dietary minerals including manganese in combination with L-cystine (2 mg), and calcium pantothenate (Priorin ® ; Bayer Inc., Mississauga, ON, Canada) taken twice daily for 6 months showed a significantly increased anagen rate in 40 female patients [11]. ...
Article
The treatment of alopecia is limited by a lack of therapies that induce and sustain disease remission. Given the negative psychosocial impact of hair loss, patients that do not see significant hair restoration with conventional therapies often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Although there are a variety of CAM treatment options on the market for alopecia, only a few are backed by multiple randomized controlled trials. Further, these modalities are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and there is a lack of standardization of bioactive in gredients in over-the-counter vitamins, herbs, and supplements. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of CAM, including natural products and mind and body practices, in the treatment of hair loss. Overall, there is a need for additional studies investigating CAM for alopecia with more robust clinical design and standardized, quantitative outcomes.
... Indeed, the number of plant species used in skin care, cosmetics and fragrances is considerably greater and continues to grow: sabal (Serenoa serrulata (Michx.) G. Nicholson) [56], gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica L.) [57], (Matricaria chamomilla L.) [58], pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) [59], mango (Mangifera indica L.) [60], gotu kola (Centella asiatica (L.) Urb.) [61], and many others. ...
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This work discusses the way people have used plants over time (basically since Ancient Egypt) to care for their physical aspect, and also how natural resources (especially plants) are currently used in personal-care products. Many plant species are ancient. This paper also shows examples of plants used for personal care which are investigated with new scientific advances.
... Although many of the components of the food supplement used in this study are supported by scientific literature for their use in alleviating signs of alopecia, in our knowledge this is the first report of a controlled, randomized clinical study that reports benefits for women with aTE and men with AGA with supplementation with a product that contains these ingredients. In Morgantil et al. a combination of Serenoa repens extract and gelatin-cystine via oral route, increase significantly (around 25%) hair number/cm² and total hair mass/cm² vs. placebo at 30 weeks in patients with androgenic alopecia [19]. ...
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Background: Hair loss in both men and women can be a psychologically stressful condition. Dietary insufficiency of essential micronutrients has been associated with hair health and hair loss. Objective: The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate the safety of use and the efficacy of a food supplement containing L-cystine, Serenoa repens, Equisetum extract, zinc, and vitamins (Lambdapil® Anti Hair Loss capsules, ISDIN, Provençals, Barcelona, Spain) in improving hair loss in both women and men. Patients/Methods: Men with androgenic alopecia and women with acute telogen effluvium were randomized to receive two capsules per day of the test product or the placebo product during a 6 months treatment period. Hair resistance to pulling and count were measured in women and men, respectively, by pull testing and phototrichogram. The overall hair volume and overall hair appearance were assessed before and after the treatment as were subject’s self-assessment via a standardized questionnaire. Results: In women, the number of hairs removed in the pull test decreased earlier for test product treated group over the 6-month period with a significantly greater decrease (p<0.05) for the treated group (12.9 at baseline vs. 6.5 hairs at 6 M) compared to the placebo group (12.8 at baseline vs. 8.8 hairs at 6 M). For men, the anagen/telogen ratio increased in the Lambdapil® treated group by 22.3% over baseline (1.93 vs. 2.36 at baseline and 6 M, respectively) indicating that there were more hair in the growing phase vs. placebo treated group (1.81 vs 1.75 at baseline and 6 M, respectively; p<0.05). The hair volume and aspect in Lambdapil® treated group improved at 1, 3 and 6 months significantly more than placebo group (p<0.05). The treatment was well tolerated. Conclusion: Dietary supplementation with Lambdapil® Anti Hair Loss capsules for 6-months was safe and effective in both women and men suffering from hair loss.
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Medical evidences of the therapeutic effect of edible gelatin on telogen effluvium and androgenetic alopecia in both men and women Medical evidences of the therapeutic effect of edible gelatin on telogen effluvium and androgenetic alopecia in both men and women This lecture is dedicated in memory of Dr. Zeev Pam, dermatologist 1953-2013 This lecture is dedicated in memory of Dr. Zeev Pam, dermatologist 1953-2013
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Objective: To review commercial products with vegetal ingredients that are used in personal hygiene and cosmetics of daily use. Collect, in the form of a catalog, botanical and pharmaceutical considerations of these extracts. Method: A field work was carried out during six months, visiting the areas of hygiene and cosmetics of four pharmacies and of three large commercial areas of Seville. All the products in which a plant name appeared appeared: used the necessary bibliography obtained through databases: Scopus, Web Of Science. Results and discussion: We found extracts from 129 different plants distributed throughout the plant kingdom (except for bryophytes). Of these, 116 are seed plants, distributed in 59 different families, being the most important: Asteraceae, Rosaceae, Lamiaceae, Poaceae, Fabaceae, Rutaceae and Sapindaceae. 42% of the plants are herbaceous, the rest are woody and some thallus. Their origins can be related to the agricultural areas traditionally cultivated by man, such as the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan. The most used organs in the elaboration of these products are: seeds, fruits, flowers (followed by the leaves). The most abundant secondary metabolites are: flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, hesperidin), vitamins (C), carbohydrates (carrageenans and fuciodans) and lipids (mono and polyunsaturated fatty acids). The main uses are: antioxidant power, aromas and fragrances, nutrients and skin moisturizers, photoprotective effect, hair care and anti-cellulite. Conclusion: The vegetable sample that has been found may be representative of the botanical species that appear in cosmetics and skin products, and everyday products of Spain. A scientific basis has also been found that supports the properties and benefits of plant extracts in these products.
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It is known how noticeable modifications may be induced in the high sulphur content proteins of wool, by enrichment of the diet of sheep with cysteine or sulphur amino acids. It is also well known how the oral ingestion of gelatin significantly increases hair diameter and the degree of hardness of finger and toe nails. To the end of verifying the possible stimulating selective action performed by cystine and gelatin in the keratinization processes of the hairy structures, it was controlled: amino acids content in hair of normal rat after oral ingestion of a controlled quantity of gelatin-cystine added in the diet. The same experiments have been carried out on rats in which the condition of sufference of the hair was induced by means of a biotin-free diet. From the obtained data it seems that gelatin-cystine, added in the diet of normal or suffering rats, helps to modify the cysteine content of the sulphur-rich hair proteins (+ 50% abt.). The diet supplement bring about a considerable increasing of CYS (+ 35%) with a decreasing of GLY (- 15%).