Article

Zaragoza's digital mile: Place-making in a new public realm

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Abstract

As the hot desert sun wanes across the plaza, horizontal shades along the roof of the museum, over the cafe, and at the bus stop suddenly rise in a graceful ballet. Pivoting upwards one at a time, they become a row of vertical screens. Gradually, they take on the subtle, complex patterns of a Moorish mosaic, a backdrop for the evening's performance. On the lawn, as the last soccer players leave, people settle down on their chairs and blankets and turn to the stage. Two kids take a running leap at the curtain of water, but it parts before they can get wet. Landing in a puddle on the other side, the sound starts a wave down the curtain that ripples along and fades in the distance. Jump twice and you get a bigger wave; jump in syncopation and you get the biggest waves of all.

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... -Laboratorios de I+D de grandes empresas -Escuelas universitarias (públicas o privadas) -Centros de formación de postgrado -Institutos universitarios de investigación -Museo de la Ciencia En este marco, los ciudadanos podrán intervenir directamente en la dinámica y funcionalidad de la Milla Digital a través de la conectividad wifi de toda el área. Así, los usuarios tendrían, en principio, la posibilidad de interactuar en la propia arquitectura y usos de los diversos espacios sociales, aprovechar dicha conectividad para su ocio y trabajo, obtener una gran variedad de información, en su mayor parte gratuita, y acceder a múltiples servicios lúdicos (Frenchman y Rojas, 2006). La Milla Digital, se transformaría así, en un espacio de 5 El MIT Media Laboratory trabaja con líneas de investigación y desarrollo, como la arquitectura y el diseño con la robótica, la inteligencia artificial, el art media, la neuroingeniería, la vida digital y todos aquellos recursos que permitan la optimización de los usos dinámicos del espacio urbano y de sus elementos. ...
... Mitchell en sus obras (2003Mitchell en sus obras ( , 2005 Los usos del proyecto no se limitarán a viviendas en propiedad de rango medio-alto, sino que deberían incluir también viviendas de protección oficial, viviendas de alquiler, apartamentos para profesionales desplazados temporalmente a la ciudad y residencia para estudiantes e investigadores". AYUNTAMIENTO DE ZARAGOZA, 2006;FRENCHMAN y ROJAS, 2006. 8º Congreso de Periodismo Digital participación ciudadana multimedia, tanto presencial como virtual, un punto de encuentro obligado para la sociedad empresarial y de ocio en la Zaragoza de la próxima década. ...
... -Laboratorios de I+D de grandes empresas -Escuelas universitarias (públicas o privadas) -Centros de formación de postgrado -Institutos universitarios de investigación -Museo de la Ciencia En este marco, los ciudadanos podrán intervenir directamente en la dinámica y funcionalidad de la Milla Digital a través de la conectividad wifi de toda el área. Así, los usuarios tendrían, en principio, la posibilidad de interactuar en la propia arquitectura y usos de los diversos espacios sociales, aprovechar dicha conectividad para su ocio y trabajo, obtener una gran variedad de información, en su mayor parte gratuita, y acceder a múltiples servicios lúdicos (Frenchman y Rojas, 2006). La Milla Digital, se transformaría así, en un espacio de 5 El MIT Media Laboratory trabaja con líneas de investigación y desarrollo, como la arquitectura y el diseño con la robótica, la inteligencia artificial, el art media, la neuroingeniería, la vida digital y todos aquellos recursos que permitan la optimización de los usos dinámicos del espacio urbano y de sus elementos. ...
... Mitchell en sus obras (2003Mitchell en sus obras ( , 2005 Los usos del proyecto no se limitarán a viviendas en propiedad de rango medio-alto, sino que deberían incluir también viviendas de protección oficial, viviendas de alquiler, apartamentos para profesionales desplazados temporalmente a la ciudad y residencia para estudiantes e investigadores". AYUNTAMIENTO DE ZARAGOZA, 2006;FRENCHMAN y ROJAS, 2006. 8º Congreso de Periodismo Digital participación ciudadana multimedia, tanto presencial como virtual, un punto de encuentro obligado para la sociedad empresarial y de ocio en la Zaragoza de la próxima década. ...
... Urban public spaces are emerging prime locations for systems embedded in a city's landscape, as demonstrated by Seitinger et al. [36] or Frenchman [14]. They extended architectural structures with interactive, light emitting elements situated on a building's outer shell. ...
... Such projects address the design operation of media façades [41]. This term describes the idea of designing or modifying a building's architecture to transform its surfaces into giant public screens [8, 14, 35]. Researchers and technology enthusiasts recently started to explore these interaction opportunities in different projects with different approaches [39]. ...
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... Large digital screens have become prevalent across today's cities dispersing into everyday urban spaces, such as public squares and cultural precincts (Foth et al., 2013a). Examples, such as Federation Square in Melbourne, Australia, demonstrate the opportunities for successfully using digital screens to create a sense of place (Frenchman & Rojas 2006) and to add long-term social, cultural and economic value for citizens, who live, work and socialise in those precincts ). ...
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