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The Negative Effects of Wildlife Tourism on Wildlife

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... Although cage diving ecotourism has great potential to inform the public about white sharks, there is some concern that cage diving operations can have negative effects on the sharks (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002;Johnson & Kock 2006;Laroche 2007). One of the main concerns is that by eating the bait, sharks will become conditioned to associate boats and humans with food, and potentially create a dependency on the bait as a major food source (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002;Johnson & Kock 2006;Laroche 2007). ...
... Although cage diving ecotourism has great potential to inform the public about white sharks, there is some concern that cage diving operations can have negative effects on the sharks (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002;Johnson & Kock 2006;Laroche 2007). One of the main concerns is that by eating the bait, sharks will become conditioned to associate boats and humans with food, and potentially create a dependency on the bait as a major food source (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002;Johnson & Kock 2006;Laroche 2007). This could cause sharks to ignore their natural prey and result in altered ecosystem dynamics (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002). ...
... One of the main concerns is that by eating the bait, sharks will become conditioned to associate boats and humans with food, and potentially create a dependency on the bait as a major food source (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002;Johnson & Kock 2006;Laroche 2007). This could cause sharks to ignore their natural prey and result in altered ecosystem dynamics (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002). Conservationists are also concerned that sharks may become habituated to the presence of boats and humans (Green & Higginbottom 2001;Orams 2002;Johnson & Kock 2006), which could put sharks at greater risk of human exploitation. ...
... But it can also bring its own problems, such as deliberate or accidental killing of wildlife, disturbance of wildlife from feeding or breeding grounds, alteration of natural behavior of wildlife, and habitat fragmentation and modification (e.g. Green and Higginbottom 2001). ...
... see Green 2014), on wildlife. For a review of actual and potential BEST EN Think Tank XV The Environment-People Nexus in Sustainable Tourism : Finding the Balance impacts of wildlife tourism on wildlife, see Green and Higginbottom (2001). Major points made in the various discussions included: ...
... . WTA has started a research network, which was initially set up for communication between tour operators who are conducting research to make them aware of others who are doing similar projects. However, it has now expanded into communication between tour operations and academics (for mutual benefit) and also tourists who wish to participate as volunteer research assistants at various levels (Green and Wood 2015). ...
... Due to developing countries' increasing need to maximise earnings from tourism, parks and reserves are suffering both environmentally and aesthetically (Green and Higginbottom, 2001). It is their duty to satisfy the demand of the tourist. ...
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