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Indirect impact of high performers on the career advancement of their subordinates

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Abstract

This paper proposes a conceptual model depicting the “indirect” impact of high performers on their subordinates' career advancement. Although certain characteristics demonstrated by high performers are not usually linked directly to either the development or career advancement of their subordinates; we propose a model to help bridge this research gap. Our conceptual framework allows us to understand the positive relation between characteristics of high performers and their subordinates' career advancement. For this paper, those characteristics were classified into two categories — a) job competencies and b) networking abilities. Using Social Learning Theory, we propose that high performers provide modelling stimuli based on live experiences to their subordinates. To better understand the relationship between the characteristics of the high performer and their subordinates' career advancement, we have explored a set of moderators and mediators pertaining to the subordinate. In addition to “indirect” impact, using past literature we have also articulated the “direct” impact on subordinates' career advancement.

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... It is assumed, then, that PD has a relationship with work performance (Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Malhotra & Singh, 2016) and requires the acquisition and improvement of skills, including formal and informal learning processes driven by contextual, individual and relational elements. Examples of contextual aspects would be the workplace, support from leadership and colleagues, information received, instructors, environment characteristics, and the offering of programs aimed at work learning, as communities of practice and mentoring (Abbad et al., 2013;Santos & Pais, 2014). ...
... We highlight the fact that Work context and Training/ Learning characterize the common core of the model, as these classes were identified in the trajectories of all professions studied. Such result is consistent with the literature in the area, which presents a direct result between PD and work performance (APA, 2010;Campbell & Wiernik, 2015;Malhotra & Singh, 2016), as well as between PD and learning throughout the career (Illeris, 2011;Kolb, 1984;Monteiro & Mourão, 2017;Pimentel, 2007). Thus, the common core of PD resulting from this research confirms the own understanding of the concept and the theoretical pillars that sustain the construct (Abbad et al., 2013;APA, 2010;Bell et al., 2017;Mourão et al., 2014;Paquay et al., 2012). ...
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... Further, stars are highly influential to the individuals around them and often serve as role models and mentors. For example, proximity to star performers benefits the career advancement of subordinates through enrichment of the latter's social capital (Malhotra & Singh, 2016). Also, women are more inspired by outstanding female than male role models (Lockwood, 2006). ...
... Third, organizations can consider utilizing stars, especially female stars, as a source of mentoring and coaching to help other women in those fields increase their performance. As past research shows, proximity to stars is linked to the career advancement of subordinates (Malhotra & Singh, 2016), and individuals who receive coaching from star performers are more likely to increase their own performance (Aguinis & Bradley, 2015). In particular, mentoring from star performers who are also women may be the most effective in terms of facilitating greater female star emergence, given the homophilous aspects of mentor-protégé relationships (Lockwood, 2006). ...
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