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Semantic-Awareness for a Useful Digital Life

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Abstract

In this book chapter the authors address two main challenges for building compelling social applications. In the first challenge they focus on the user by addressing the issue of building dynamic interaction profiles from the content they produce in a social system. Such profiles are key to find the best person to contact based on an information need. The second challenge presents their vision of "object-centered sociality", which allows users to create spontaneous communities centered on a digital or physical object. In each case, proof-of-concept industrial prototypes show the potential impact of the concepts on the daily life of users. The main contribution of this chapter is the design of conceptual frameworks for helping users to take maximum advantage from their participation in online communities, either in the digital web ecosystem or real-life spontaneous communities.

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