Article

E-Government Portal Information Performance and the Role of Local Community Interest. Empirical Support for a Model of Citizen Perceptions

Authors:
  • DB Bahn, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
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Abstract

E-government portals at the local level are a vital part of the modernization of public administration. However, there are few research articles that focus on the informational success factors of these portal websites. As the foundation of more advanced service levels, informational offers still constitute the majority of e-government content. In this article, a model of e-government usage with a focus on informational offers is empirically tested. The four dimensions information attractiveness, information usefulness, information awareness, and ease of navigation are used as relevant criteria for user-based informational performance perception. Using structural equation modelling a moderating effect of local community interest can be shown. Citizens with low interest in their community show a higher dependency on information attractiveness, information usefulness, information awareness, and ease of navigation to predict the usage intention. Corresponding implications for future research and practitioners are derived.

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... The continuing academic debate about how to define e-government (Bannister & Connolly, 2015;Estevez & Janowski, 2013;Heeks & Bailur, 2007) is mirrored in the continuing discussion about how to measure it (Wirtz, Piehler, Rieges, & Daiser, 2016). Several approaches to measuring e-government can be found in the literature. ...
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... In the meantime, previous research on e-government appropriation has for the most part centered on the developed nations; for example, learn concerning the acknowledgment as well as utilization of government Internet benefits in Netherland [14], a research focused on the client who uses egovernment in Belgium [15], and assessment of government e-charge sites in Sweden [16]. ...
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