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Die Darstellung von Politikern auf YouTube. Die Rolle von Humor in der Politikvermittlung

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Abstract

Die Entwicklung der Mediennutzung in Deutschland ist ungebrochen und scheint permanent zuzunehmen (vgl. van Eimeren/Ridder 2011). Betrachtet man die Zunahme differenzierter, dann sind es in erster Linie der audiovisuelle Bereich und Angebote im Internet, deren Nutzung zunimmt. Vor allem Videoplattformen wie YouTube und Social Network Sites (SNS) wie Facebook spielen in der Internetnutzung Heranwachsender eine zentrale Rolle (vgl. Frees/van Eimeren, 2011: 354, Wagner/Brüggen/Gebel 2009) und werden nicht nur zur Unterhaltung, sondern zunehmend auch für die tagesaktuelle Information genutzt (vgl. Busemann/Gscheidle 2011). Gerade in der Gruppe der 14-19 Jährigen ist seit einigen Jahren ein deutlicher Rückgang der Fernseh- und Radionutzung zu beobachten, die offenbar immer stärker durch die Nutzung von Internetangeboten substituiert wird (vgl. van Eimeren/Ridder 2011).

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... There are several other media characteristics that compete with popularity cues affecting media selection. First and foremost, news factors (Eilders, 2006), such as conflict or unexpectedness and humor (Keyling, Kümpel, & Brosius, 2015), catch the online audience's attention and prevent it from being susceptible to popularity cues' effects. Finally, context matters: People may consider popularity cues regarding opinions on issues depicted in the media, especially if the issues are controversial, as it is particularly important to know the public opinion in such cases. ...
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This study investigates whether the entertainment media produce different patterns of political information acquisition and information processing (i.e., online- vs. memory-based information processing) in making political judgments (i.e., evaluation of a political actor) compared to the news media. Using an adult sample (aged 18-64 years), the study adopts an experimental design using the collections of real news and entertainment programs (The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) on the topic of the U.S. Supreme Court Justice and Chief Justice nomination processes in addition to a baseline group exposed to science documentaries. The results indicate that compared to news media, entertainment media are less effective in acquiring factual information, particularly in retaining issue and procedure knowledge. The study, for the first time, reveals that entertainment media facilitate online-based political information processing, whereas news media promote memory-based political information processing. The implications for the methodological and theoretical development of the impact of entertainment media and for citizen competence and participation in the recent changes in the political information environment are discussed.
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The current study assesses the effect of exposure to diverse comedy types, measuring the differential impact of other-directed hostile humor and self-ridicule on feelings toward John McCain. Specifically, the analyses use experimental data collected in 2009 to compare the differential impact of viewing a video clip of John McCain's playful self-satire on Saturday Night Live with the effects of exposure to the more aggressive, judgmental, other-directed hostile humor of Stephen Colbert. The results suggest that viewers cool toward McCain after exposure to Stephen Colbert's other-directed hostile humor. Additional analyses show that the effect of exposure to varied types of political humor is direct and relatively impervious to moderation by political partisanship. Implications of the findings and their ability to help researchers understand the differential influence of varied comedy message types on political evaluations and attitudes is discussed.
Conference Paper
Being popular in YouTube is becoming a fundamental way of promoting one's self, services or products. In this paper, we conduct an in depth study of fundamental properties of video popularity in YouTube. We collect and study arguably the largest dataset of YouTube videos, roughly 37 million, accounting for 25% of all YouTube videos. We analyze popularity in a comprehensive fashion by looking at properties and patterns in time and considering various popularity metrics. We further study the relationship of the popularity metrics and we find that four of them are highly correlated (viewcount, #comments, #ratings, #favorites) while the fifth one, the average rating, exhibits very little correlation with the other metrics. We also find a "magic number" in the average behavior of videos: for every 400 times a video is viewed, we have one of each of the following user actions: leaving a comment, rating the video and adding to one's favorite set.
Article
Political campaigns are often characterized by the various events occurring that move the tide in favor of one candidate or another. Each event, depending on which candidate it favors or harms, produces either happiness or sadness for those who care about the outcome. This research examined whether such reactions would hold for events that are misfortunes for other people and even when they negatively affect society more broadly regardless of political party affiliation. Ingroup (i.e. political party) identification was examined as an important moderating variable. In four studies, undergraduate participants gave their emotional reactions to news articles describing misfortunes happening to others (e.g. poor economic news and house foreclosures). Party affiliation and the intensity of ingroup identification strongly predicted whether these events produced schadenfreude.
Late Night Partisans: Major Late Night Comedy Programs in 2010 Retrieved from
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  • Public Affairs
Was ist denn da (so) lustig…? Anmerkungen zum Stand der Forschung. merz (medien + erziehung
  • Hans-Dieter Kübler
Kübler, Hans-Dieter (2005). Was ist denn da (so) lustig...? Anmerkungen zum Stand der Forschung. merz (medien+erziehung), 49(4), 29-34.
The YouTube Reader (S. 268-274)
  • Rick Prelinger
Prelinger, Rick (2009). The Appearance of Archives. In Snickars, Pelle/Vonderau, Patrick (Hrsg.), The YouTube Reader (S. 268-274). Stockholm: National Library of Sweden.