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El papel de los medios online en epidemias sanitarias: una comparación de las esferas públicas de México y España

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... First, convergence and normalization phases are ahead of us -in 2022-2023if we are optimistic. Second, some studies of recent infectious epidemics have not found all phases (Idoiaga, 2012;Idoiaga, Gil & Valencia, 2018). Third, as in all phase models, phases often do not occur sequentially in reality, there are phenomena of regressions and leaps -see classical analysis of mourning phase models (Bonano & Boerner, 2007). ...
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This special issue of PSR focuses on the social representations of SARS or Covid- 19. The first study by Pizarro and colleagues analyzes the prevalence of social representations about the Covid-19 pandemic in 17 countries in the Americas, Europe and Asia, their association with perceived risk and their anchoring in sociopolitical beliefs, such as RWA and SDO. The second and third articles comment on the social communication processes around Covid-19 in Brazil and France (Apostolidis, Santos, & Kalampalikis, this issue; Justo, Bousfield, Giacomozzi, & Camargo, this issue), the fourth in Italy and a last one in South Africa (de Rosa & Mannarini, this issue; Sitto & Lubinga, this issue). Three studies (fifth, sixth and seventh) examines the structure of social representations related to Covid-19 using questionnaires, the free-association technique and inductive terms like Coronavirus (Colì, Norcia & Bruzzone, this issue; Fasanelli, Piscitelli & Galli, this issue) and the new normality (Emiliani et al., this issue), analyzed by different techniques like automatic lexical analysis (IRaMuTeQ). Finally, Denise Jodelet makes a final comment and closes this issue with a reflection on Covid-19 “a separate epidemic”. In this introduction, rather than summarizing the articles, we will develop the themes and the questions they raise. Keywords: social representations, covid-19; anchorage, propaganda, conspiracy, cognitive polyphasia
... First, convergence and normalization phases are ahead of us -in 2022-2023 -if we are optimistic. Second, some studies of recent infectious epidemics have not found all phases (Idoiaga, 2012;Idoiaga, Gil & Valencia, 2018). Third, as in all phase models, phases often do not occur sequentially in reality, there are phenomena of regressions and leaps -see classical analysis of mourning phase models (Bonano & Boerner, 2007). ...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue of PSR focuses on the social representations of SARS or Covid- 19. The first study analyzes the prevalence of social representations about the Covid-19 pandemic in 17 countries in the Americas, Europe and Asia, their association with perceived risk and their anchoring in sociopolitical beliefs, such as RWA and SDO. The second and third articles comment on the social communication processes around Covid-19 in Brazil and France (Apostolidis, Santos, & Kalampalikis, 2020; Justo, Bousfield, Giacomozzi, & Camargo, 2020), the fourth in Italy and a last one in South Africa (de Rosa & Mannarini, 2020; Sitto & Lubinga, 2020). Three studies (fifth, sixth and seventh) examines the structure of social representations related to Covid-19 using questionnaires, the free-association technique and inductive terms like Coronavirus (Colì, Norcia & Bruzzone, 2020; Fasanelli, Piscitelli & Galli, 2020) and the new normality (Emiliani et al., 2020), analyzed by different techniques like automatic lexical analysis (IRaMuTeQ). Finally, Denise Jodelet makes a final comment and closes this issue with a reflection on Covid-19 “a separate epidemic”. In this introduction, rather than summarizing the articles, we will develop the themes and the questions they raise.
... First, convergence and normalization phases are ahead of us -in 2022-2023if we are optimistic. Second, some studies of recent infectious epidemics have not found all phases (Idoiaga, 2012;Idoiaga, Gil & Valencia, 2018). Third, as in all phase models, phases often do not occur sequentially in reality, there are phenomena of regressions and leaps -see classical analysis of mourning phase models (Bonano & Boerner, 2007). ...
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Today we are experiencing a radical break in our daily lives in the face of the covid-19 pandemic. Faced with a situation of widespread threat, our societies are caught in an unprecedented spiral of coercive measures and social control. In this context, we are not only witnessing a global health pandemic, but also, and above all, a social pandemic under the prism, in particular, of over-focusing media and the flood of communications. Indeed, the covid-19 is not only a medical and scientific object, but an eminently social one. The social representations approach offers a unique paradigm for studying this exceptional phenomenon. Apostolidis, T., Santos, F. & Kalampalikis, N. (2020). Society against covid-19: challenges for the socio-genetic point of view of social representations. Papers on Social Representations, 29(2), 3.1-3.14
... Estudios sobre epidemias como la gripe porcina ilustran esta idea del afrontamiento simbólico, ya que encontraron una correlación positiva entre la cobertura del brote en México y España y la cantidad de infectados por esta gripe, así como entre la primera y la representación de la salud como un problema para el ciudadano en España(Idoiaga, 2012; Iodoiaga et al.,2016 Iodoiaga et al., , 2018.2 Una hipótesis que se puede plantear es que el mayor consumo de información, el tipo de información (medios sociales frente a medios de comunicación de masas tradicional), así como el grado de compartimiento social o comunicación interpersonal, se asociaran al contenido y polarización de creencias y actitudes. ...
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Esta es una versión ampliada del artículo del mismo título que será publicada en la Revista de Psicología Social, ahora International Journal of Social Psychology, que incluye párrafos que no han sido sometidos a la revisión de pares, así como le bibliografía es mucho mas extensa. This is an expanded version of the paper that will Social representations (SRRs) are conceived as forms of collective symbolic coping. Their theoretical framework describes the processes of meaning creation by which social groups interpret novel events that question their world views, such as when new diseases and catastrophes such as the corona virus emerge (Vala & Castro, 2017). These creative processes take place through the communication that emerges around the event, for example, conversations between individuals, through social media and/or mass media communication. In these processes, representations of the event are constructed and disseminated, which creatively assimilate scientific discourses in a common sense (Pérez, 2004). A first idea is that the greater consumption of information, the type of information (social media versus traditional mass media), as well as the degree of interpersonal communication, will be associated with the content and polarization of beliefs and attitudes. The framework of SSRs suggests clues as to how individuals and groups will develop attitudes, beliefs, images and orientations of shared behaviours about this disease, through processes first of anchorage, then of objectification and characterised by cognitive polyphase. ´ In the case of epidemics, the link established between a new disease and previous ones is usually made through an anchorage mechanism, which integrates the understanding of the new one by framing it in the culture. The process of anchoring makes the unknown more familiar and eventually less threatening (Moscovici, 2000). In the early stages of Covid, its resemblance to the annual flu cycle was raised, de-dramatizing it.
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