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Atlas of the European dragonflies and damselflies

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This work is the first detailed and comprehensive overview of the distribution of the dragonflies and damselflies of Europe. It is an important milestone for professionals and amateurs alike. Covers the distribution and habitat selection of all 143 European species of dragonflies and damselflies. Gives a complete description of their global and European distribution, illustrated by over 200 distribution maps. Gives for each species information on taxonomy, range, population trends, flights season and habitat. Includes unique photos and flight season diagrams for virtually all European species. Contains extensive background information on taxonomy, conservation, and for each country an overview of the history of odonatological studies. The book is the result of a co-operation of over 50 European dragonfly experts who over the past decade compiled all records of dragonflies and damselflies, from the Azores to the Ural and from the North Cape to Lampedusa. These records were gathered by thousands of volunteers from across Europe. This endeavour was coordinated by Jean- Pierre Boudot (Société Française d’Odonatologie) and Vincent Kalkman (European Invertebrate Survey – Netherlands/Naturalis Biodiversity Centre). To download the file, please click on 'More' and then to 'Download' on the menu above.
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... At the time when this study was undertaken, only a few countries had a database with distribution records and rarely were maps showing the diversity available. Now, twenty years later, the availability of distribution data has shown a strong increase with databases currently available for Africa, Europe, Australia, North America, and parts of Asia [2][3][4][5], and it seems likely that within a decade, such databases will span the global range of Odonata. However, this will not mean that distribution patterns of all species will be known, let alone understood, as these databases simply contain an overview of available records and, for many species, distribution maps will often illustrate a lack of field work for some areas. ...
... For the Western Palaearctic, distribution data have been brought together, resulting in atlases for the Mediterranean and North Africa [11], Europe [3], and West and Central Asia [12]. Distribution data for Japan were derived from a database constructed by the National Biodiversity Center of Japan [13] to which data used for the maps presented in the field guide of the Japanese odonates were added [14]. ...
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Citation: Kalkman, V.J.; Boudot, J.-P.; Futahashi, R.; Abbott, J.C.; Bota-Sierra, C.A.; Guralnick, R.; Bybee, S.M.; Ware, J.; Belitz, M.W. Diversity of Palaearctic Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata). Diversity 2022, 14, 966. https://doi. More than 1.2 million distribution records were used to create species distribution models for 402 Palaearctic species of dragonflies and damselflies. On the basis of these diversity maps of total, lentic and lotic diversity for the whole of the Palaearctic (excluding China and the Himalayan region) are presented. These maps show a clear pattern of decreasing diversity longitudinally, with species numbers dropping in the eastern half of Europe and remaining low throughout a large part of Russia, then increasing again towards Russia’s Far East and Korea. There are clear differences in diversity patterns of lentic and lotic species, with lentic species being dominant in colder and more arid areas. Areas with a high diversity of species assessed as threatened on the IUCN red list are largely restricted to the Mediterranean, Southwest Asia, and Japan, with clear hotspots found in the Levant and the southern half of Japan. The diversity at species, generic, and family level is higher in the south of Japan than in areas at a similar latitude in the western Mediterranean. This is likely to be the result of the more humid climate of Japan resulting in a higher diversity of freshwater habitats and the stronger impact of the glacial periods in the Western Palaearctic in combination with the Sahara, preventing tropical African lineages dispersing northwards.
... We studied three high-latitude and three low-latitude populations of Ischnura elegans within the species' European range (Boudot and Kalkman, 2015 Between mid-June and mid-July 2019, 25-35 mated females were collected in each population. The females were individually placed in small plastic vials with wet filter paper for oviposition. ...
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