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The Relationship Between Leadership Development and Leadership Formation

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Abstract

Explores the Relationship Between Executive Development and Leadership Formation
... inquiry, and a broader concept of community and the common good to underlie successful innovation (Delbecq 2013a). Moreover, Andre realized that as an established scholar-teacher and educational leader he was in a privileged position to introduce the campus community to the idea that one's vocation included the intimate integration of one's faith perspective into one's work. ...
... In seeing, Andre was able to discern the contemporary scenario in which he found himself and understood what the world needs from him. Thus, in addressing important emerging issues in his scholarship and teaching, Andre envisioned an innovative pedagogy to engage his graduate students in their search for both leadership formation and spiritual formation (Delbecq 2000(Delbecq , 2003bPalmer 2007;Delbecq 2008Delbecq , 2010Delbecq , 2013a. Based on Andre's work with Christian executives in the Silicon Valley, he sought to prepare graduate students for reflection and discernment that could free them from hyper-competitive behavior and preying on the imperfection of others in the workplace; in addition, he emphasized that their business talents should be seen as a gift to be exercised on behalf of others Delbecq 2005). ...
... For example, Andre's vocation demonstrated a spiritual dialogue in which others could learn to make their existence meaningful, connecting their interior lives to their external actions in terms of how they lived communally with others. Andre's projects ( , Delbecq 2003b( , 2008( , 2013a drew upon the great religious and wisdom traditions and referenced their symbolic languages, inviting others of goodwill to reflect on their faith traditions and utilize those in a way that went beyond utilitarian ends. Because people outside of religious traditions can discover a sense of vocational calling in their own lives, Andre taught spirituality both a worldview and a path, where spirituality may be informed by one of the great religious traditions or may be an eclectic mixture of spiritual insights (Delbecq 2004a(Delbecq , 2008(Delbecq , 2010. ...
Article
In the past, the typical business school professional saw little need to even broach the spiritual calling. However, Andre’s vocational journey as a scholar-teacher significantly contributed to this change, and many of his colleagues are continuing and looking forward to the possibilities of Andre’s work. Through a Jesuit-lay friendship with the second author, the first author began to take Andre’s call in integrating business as a noble vocation at the undergraduate business level. In connecting classroom assignments and activities with Andre’s scholarship, undergraduate business students were invited to consider what kind of person they would want to be and what kind of world they would want to live in. Here, the article chronicles the work of Andre that inspired changes in the first author’s pedagogy toward coursework that embraces the discipline to make profits along with the discipline to be human – crossing geographical, political, cultural and religious boundaries – in order to meet the world’s needs.
... For example, Vu and Burton (2020) discuss Buddhist mindfulness and Quaker discernment practices as encouraging moral reflexivity and awareness. Delbecq (2000Delbecq ( , 2013 describes the role of Eastern and Western spiritual practices in developing leaders to live and lead more consciously moment-to-moment, enabling more ethical behavior. ...
... Our SD, LD, and MD framework is presented in Table 1, extending upon the TBCL and other concepts already provided. Our framework also reflects notions present in other writings and religious and spiritual development models (Barrett, 2003;Benefiel, 2005Benefiel, , 2008Delbecq, 2000Delbecq, , 2013Kriger & Seng, 2005;Weinberg & Locander, 2014). Each level is presented in relation to the ways of knowing and being implicit to the SD levels, indicators of LD and MD, and conventional (for examples see Megheirkouni & Megheirkouni, 2020) and non-conventional LD and MD interventions. ...
Article
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Interest in spirituality in the workplace and in leaders’ spirituality has grown in the last two decades, paralleled by the emergence of spiritual leadership theories and research. Despite evidence that spirituality is important to many leaders, the literature fails to adequately address the intersections of spiritual, leader, and moral development. A whole person and integrated approach to these three types of development seems beneficial to individual leaders, businesses, and society. In this article we first review spiritual, moral, and leader development literature. Then, drawing on the theory of being-centered leadership, we present a framework which addresses the parallel and intertwined nature of spiritual, leader, and moral development. Our proposed framework includes markers of the three types of development and is inclusive of multiple spiritual development traditions. Four practices and processes of spiritual development are also explored and related to leader and moral development processes. Implications for theory, research, and practice are presented.
... Western (2017) and Bachkirova (2011) highlight that executives might, at times, have spiritual experiences, interests and urges that they wish to bring to coaching. Incorporating SDev into EC seems appropriate when executive leaders expresses a desire to move beyond self-interest to connect with, and draw strength from, a Higher Power in their search for purpose and meaning, a supportive community, prosocial values to guide their leadership and life, and a source of strength and comfort during experiences of adversity (Allen and Williams, 2017;Barry and Connolly, 2009;Delbecq, 2013;Peterson and Seligman, 2004). This is consistent with the broader trend toward taking a whole person approach to work and adult education (Hicks, 2003;Jacobsen and Jacobsen, 2012;Miller, 2007;Miller and Ewest, 2015). ...
... Spiritual development in executive coaching Delbecq's (2013) "The relationship between leadership development and leadership formation" emphasizes the difference between leadership development and leadership formation and the importance of the spiritual journey, contemplative practice, discernment, calling and dark nights of the soul to leadership formation (Fry, 2019). Leadership development emphasizes managerial and organizational abilities and skills contributing to effective leadership, often taught in business schools and workplace leadership training programs, which to date has been the primary focus of EC. ...
Article
Purpose Spiritual topics emerge in executive leadership coaching. However, the scholarly literature has emphasized the performance development aspects of executive coaching (EC) more than the development of executives’ inner lives, although there is some evidence of practitioners addressing spiritual topics. Executive leaders have spiritual needs and executive coaches may be well positioned to address the intersection of the leaders’ work and spiritual lives, provided coaches observe skill boundaries and the limitations of the coaching context. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the merits of including spiritual development (SDev) in EC and how executive coaches can incorporate it in their practice. Design/methodology/approach EC, SDev and spiritual direction are compared, drawing attention to conflicting and complementary aspects of SDev applied in EC. Organizations’, clients’ and coaches’ likely concerns about such integration are explored and addressed. Suitable contexts, principles, a basic developmental framework and practical steps for executive coaches considering the inclusion of SDev in EC are proposed. Findings The paper provides coaches, consultants, executives and those charged with executive development with a foundational understanding of the role of SDev in EC. Originality/value A framework is provided for professionals involved in executive management development to address executive leaders’ spiritual needs through EC.
... Western (2017) and Bachkirova (2011) highlight that executives might, at times, have spiritual experiences, interests and urges that they wish to bring to coaching. Incorporating SDev into EC seems appropriate when executive leaders expresses a desire to move beyond self-interest to connect with, and draw strength from, a Higher Power in their search for purpose and meaning, a supportive community, prosocial values to guide their leadership and life, and a source of strength and comfort during experiences of adversity (Allen and Williams, 2017;Barry and Connolly, 2009;Delbecq, 2013;Peterson and Seligman, 2004). This is consistent with the broader trend toward taking a whole person approach to work and adult education (Hicks, 2003;Jacobsen and Jacobsen, 2012;Miller, 2007;Miller and Ewest, 2015). ...
... Spiritual development in executive coaching Delbecq's (2013) "The relationship between leadership development and leadership formation" emphasizes the difference between leadership development and leadership formation and the importance of the spiritual journey, contemplative practice, discernment, calling and dark nights of the soul to leadership formation (Fry, 2019). Leadership development emphasizes managerial and organizational abilities and skills contributing to effective leadership, often taught in business schools and workplace leadership training programs, which to date has been the primary focus of EC. ...
... We have not summarized the content he taught in detail, as it is extensively described in his previous articles (e.g., Delbecq 1999Delbecq , 2000Delbecq , 2003Delbecq , 2010aDelbecq , 2012Delbecq , 2013. For example, his 2003 article includes a comprehensive syllabus in the appendix. ...
... André's teaching was grounded in his applied scholarship and interdisciplinary approach, which was evident from early in his career. He also differentiated between leadership education and leaders' spiritual formation (e.g., Delbecq 2013). It was clear that his classes and seminars aimed to form his students as leaders with meaningful spiritual lives, more than filling students' heads with knowledge. ...
Article
André Delbecq is remembered as a pioneer for his groundbreaking courses on spirituality for executive leaders. He generously shared his experiences with other educators in multiple presentations and articles beginning in the late 1990s. His writings provide insight into the content of his classes and practical teaching approach in the classroom. In this article and the accompanying video, edited from an interview with André in 2015, we provide an overview of André’s entry into teaching management, spirituality, and religion, and we reflect on his teaching philosophy. The video provides the reader with a glimpse of André’s warmth, passion, and wisdom on this topic. His work and approach stand as a guiding light for those similarly interested in preparing leaders for the spiritual challenges of leadership roles.
... Although Andre did not work extensively with organizational leaders as a scholar or consultant for organizational transformation and development of MSR-grounded organizations, he did speak to the fundamentals of MSR organization design and organizational culture that would support such efforts, especially in terms of teamwork and decision-making (Delbecq 2008(Delbecq , 2009(Delbecq , 2013a(Delbecq , 2016. ...
Article
The purpose of this piece is to offer a sense of Andre Delbecq as the pioneering founder of management, spirituality, and religion (MSR) as a field of scholarly inquiry. In his unique way, André, informed by his solid knowledge of organizational processes and his Christian faith, integrated spirituality into his teaching and scholarship. First I offer an overview of his early career roots which laid the foundation for this work and the impetus for his work on MSR, which defined the later years of his long and distinguished career. Then I review the context and motivations that led to his offering a seminar on Spirituality for Organizational Leadership, from which evolved what he saw as successful strategies for MSR scholarship and teaching. Next, comes an overview of his view of the fundamental role MSR should play in organizational design and culture, with an emphasis on teamwork and decision-making. Following this is an exploration of his groundbreaking work on leadership formation with a focus on the spiritual journey, discernment, and humility as an offset to hubris. Finally his thoughts concerning “Where do we go from here’ are offered.
Chapter
In the Preface, we introduced Andre Delbecq’s heuristic of a “spiritually and developmentally mature leader”; and we noted that a heuristic, like a brainteaser, points one’s thoughts in a certain direction; but, instead of providing answers, it generates questions. Indeed, the deeper one explores a heuristic, the more questions that may arise! In this chapter, we offer concluding thoughts on questions we posed in the preface; and we include material on two vital threads—community and transcendence—that ran through the Delbecq Retreat, but were not explicitly mentioned top three in the Nominal Group Technique. Community and transcendence are so intricately woven into our understanding of spiritually and developmentally mature leadership that we must acknowledge them here.
Chapter
This literature review provides four foci of importance to our examination of a spiritually mature leader. We first focus on Andre Delbecq himself, and the tremendous contributions he made to the field of Spirituality and Organizational Leadership. The review then shifts focus and examines the developmentally mature leader, focusing on various research studies that have emerged and provide us a better understanding of this topic. Third, the literature review moves towards an understanding of what might be a “spiritually mature leader,” exploring the presence or rather the lack thereof of this term, albeit present in research conducted. But also, including a new cutting-edge dissertation by Freer (2017) that takes on this question as it relates to the spiritually mature organization. Finally, we sample insights on spirituality and leadership from the field of psychology of religion. Through all of this literature, as well as our study itself, we hope to make a promising step toward understanding “what is a spiritually mature leader?”
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