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An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary

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This is the first text book to offer a comprehensive approach to Old Frisian. Part One begins with a succinct survey of the history of the Frisians during the Middle Ages, their society and literary culture. Next follow chapters on the phonology, morphology, word formation and syntax of Old Frisian. This part is concluded by a chapter on the Old Frisian dialects and one on problems regarding the periodization of Frisian and the close relationship between (Old) Frisian and (Old) English. Part Two consists of a reader with a representative selection of twenty-one texts with explanatory notes and a full glossary. A bibliography and a select index complete the book. Written by an experienced teacher and researcher in the field, An Introduction to Old Frisian is an essential resource for students and researchers of Frisian, Old English and other 'Old' Germanic languages and cultures, and for medievalists working in this area. The second unrevised 2011 reprint of the original edition contains several corrections.

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... Furthermore, in Old Frisian, breaking of /i e/ is restricted to /xC/ (the output of both is spelt either <iu> or <io>). And no breaking of /ae/ occurred because fronting of NSGmc * /a/ > [ae] was blocked before /xC lC rC/, which again suggests that these clusters had some kind of velarising/backing effect (Bremmer 2009: §40, § §48-9). ...
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