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Envisioning the Internet: Implementing 'disruptive innovation' in media organizations

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Abstract

When incorporating networked technologies, many established organizations face immense challenges, as these media involve new economic and cultural components. Predictions based on models concerning the incorporation of the so-called 'disruptive innovations' in established firms, are being offered in this paper, viewing networked technologies as 'disruptive innovations'. The study underscores the obstacles that limit implementation of such technologies in mainstream media organizations, and considers the strategies that might be used to overcome them. Analyzing the case of Israel's leading newspaper, Yedioth Ahronoth, between the years 1995-2000, it shows how managers of this traditional business approached the Internet. This paper analyzes how they respond to the ostensibly 'disruptive' networked innovation, eventually turning their organization's Web site into the country's chief news and content provider. This study offers lessons that extend beyond this specific case onto the broader vista of the implementation of 'disruptive' (networked) technologies in mainstream media environments.

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... These are the kinds of questions I would like to discuss in this chapter with respect to the news media's motivation for digital transformation. Scholars have observed a number of factors that motivate them for such technological transitions, which include fear-driven defensive innovations (Nguyen, 2008), digital disruption (Ashuri, 2013;Mesquita, 2017), and crisis (Zelizer, 2015). All of these factors take into consideration that one aspect due to which newspapers in industrial countries moved to online was the less interest of younger generation on newspapers, stagnant or decreased circulation, Similarly, Zelizer (2015) also argues that the use of the term "crisis" to account for multiple sources of uncertainties is less useful. ...
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Chapter
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... 27 Ashuri's 2013 article focuses on disruptive Web technologies. 28 Finally, Sultan's 2013 article approaches myriad new and emerging technologies used in libraries as disruptive innovations, giving a nod to Christensen's disruptive technologies theory in the process. 29 Not all interest in disruptive technologies in libraries has been scholarly. ...
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