Article

Partial replacement of concentrate mixture with Leucaena leucocephala leaves in pelleted feed of goats

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Abstract

Thirty per cent replacement of concentrate mixture (or 9.80% in total diet consumed) with Leucaena leaves in pellet has given comparable DM, TDN and DCP intake with that of mash fed control. Values of ruminal pH, total VFA, total-N, ammonia-N and protozoa counts were also similar with that of control. Hence, pelleted feed with 30% Leucaena leaf can be fed easily to adult Marwari goats for their maintenance. Addtion of Leucaena leaves in the mash reduced the cost of pellet by 21.43%.

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... "The Leucaena leaves meal or fresh leaves can also replace concentrate diets, since it increases total daily dry matter and protein intake, and thus improving growth rate of animals" [13,14]. Also, it was reported that the Leucaena foliage inclusion levels between 500g/kg, DM and 750g/kg, DM can be replaced concentrate diet without adversely affecting the growth and milk production performances in goats [15,16] ...
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... L. leucocephala gives better dry matter intake, weight gain, and reproductive performance than other legumes such as alfalfa, Lablab purpureus, and Gliricidia sepium [54][55][56][57]. In a grassbased diet for goat, L. leucocephala dry matter foliage can be included at 30% to 75% [58][59][60], and it does not affect the goats' growth and milk production [60]. Fresh or wilted L. leucocephala is better than dried L. leucocephala leaves as a dry matter intake, growth rate and nitrogen utilization [61]. ...
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Leucaena leucocephala trees are commonly known as White Lead tree. It is native to Southern Mexico and Northern Central America and spread across many tropical and subtropical locations. It has multipurpose uses, such as generation of firewood, timber, greens, fodder, and green manure, as well as to provide shade and control soil erosion. It has been used for medicinal purposes because of possessing multiple pharmacological properties. Studies have shown the presence of various secondary metabolites such as alkaloid, cardiac glycosides, tannins, flavonoids, saponins, and glycosides in this species. In traditional medicine, it is used to control stomach ache and as contraception and abortifacient. In the present study, the global distribution, taxonomy, chemical composition, pharmacological activities, and potential uses of Leucaena leucocephalaare discussed.
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