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Food security under siege: An approach to social and geopolitical implications of the second Green Revolution: The argentinean case

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Abstract

The process called the Green Revolution has been spreading a carbon-fuelled productive dynamic throughout the world since the end of WW II. The lack of modification of that dynamic over decades, plus the current biotechnological change, poses serious challenges that first revolution has not solved. Do genetically modified organisms (GMO) represent a sustainable alternative to a matrix which still relies highly on fossil fuel inputs? Does the depletion of natural resources and loss of biodiversity caused by monoculture go along with agribusiness growth? Would GMO patenting trigger a new kind of competition for resources among international actors? These factors-along with the production of biofuels, population growth and environmental change among others-interacting altogether show a complex scenario for food security, and in general, hard to handle challenges for the agenda of decision makers agenda in the public policy realm. This process has been massively implemented in Argentina, being currently the second major producer of GM crops in the world, with a total area of 22 million hectares. Beyond monolithic points of view that take for granted the sustainability of the food supply system, Argentina's situation show a significant example that this effective productive matrix should be apprehended more thoroughly. To be capable to cope with future complex scenarios on this matter would be of paramount significance for human security.

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... GM seeds belong to the company that produced them, essentially renting them to the farmers who have to repurchase each year. Consider the applicability of the concept of 'food sovereignty', which encompasses the right to decide locally the use and production that does not depend on foreign actors (Borrell, 2010). ...
... GM seeds belong to the company that produced them, essentially renting them to the farmers who have to repurchase each year. Consider the applicability of the concept of 'food sovereignty', which encompasses the right to decide locally the use and production that does not depend on foreign actors (Borrell, 2010). ...
... Sovereignty understood as the right to decide locally the use and production that does not depend on foreign actors. (Borrell, 2010) However, should the technology move into the public sector it does have the potential to significantly reduce the dependence of chemical inputs and irrigation, while simultaneously increase crop yields (Anderson, 2014). This would allow for the production of more food on the same amount of land with fewer costs in the form of inputs (Meyers & Kalaitzandoakes, 2015). ...
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