Article

Bilateral Hemiarthroplasty in a Patient with Below-Knee and Above-Knee Amputations: A Case Report

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Abstract

Case: This case involved a sixty-two-year-old male patient with bilateral femoral neck fractures that occurred six months apart in the setting of bilateral lower-extremity amputation. Hemiarthroplasty was performed at each presentation, with the use of a standard femoral stem on the right side and a short stem on the left. At the time of follow-up, the patient had returned to his preoperative ambulatory status. Conclusion: This case report illustrates successful bilateral hemiarthroplasty in a patient who had previously undergone bilateral lower-extremity amputation, with use of an implant with a short stem for the limb with above-knee amputation.

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... BMD is observed to be lower in an Plate 5: clinical photograph in the post operative period with prosthesis in place individual with above knee amputation compared to a below knee amputation. [10,11]. In addition to decreased BMD, amputees showed altered gait mechanics, which may predispose them to lowenergy falls [12]. ...
... Operative challenges associated with arthroplasty in an amputated limb include; choice of surgical approach, manipulation and positioning of the affected limb [11], as well as severe osteoporosis and residual length of the femur [11,15]. As a result of the above, there is the need to use an approach that will give a better exposure for the orientation of the implant and positioning that will allow easy manipulation. ...
... Operative challenges associated with arthroplasty in an amputated limb include; choice of surgical approach, manipulation and positioning of the affected limb [11], as well as severe osteoporosis and residual length of the femur [11,15]. As a result of the above, there is the need to use an approach that will give a better exposure for the orientation of the implant and positioning that will allow easy manipulation. ...
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