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The Blues as Cultural Expression

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Two Categories of the BluesWhat is Cultural Expression?A Too-Loose Definition of CultureConclusion Notes

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... The intention of this chapter, however, is not to engage with the well-worn debate over authenticity (see Claviez, this volume), which has been thoroughly explored over the years (e.g. Rudinow 1994, Baraka 1999, Daley 2003, Young 2008, Jenkins 2012. The idea that only contemporary blacks have a right to sing the Blues because of their share in ancestral suffering under slavery is well answered by Rudinow (1994, 133): ...
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techniques and approaches in Blues singing between black and white singers
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Now, for the first time, a philosopher undertakes a systematic investigation of the moral and aesthetic issues to which cultural appropriation gives rise. Cultural appropriation is a pervasive feature of the contemporary world (the Parthenon Marbles remain in London; white musicians from Bix Beiderbeck to Eric Clapton have appropriated musical styles from African-American culture). Young offers the first systematic philosophical investigation of the moral and aesthetic issues to which cultural appropriation gives rise. Tackles head on the thorny issues arising from the clash and integration of cultures and their artifacts. Questions considered include: "Can cultural appropriation result in the production of aesthetically successful works of art?" and "Is cultural appropriation in the arts morally objectionable?". Part of the highly regarded New Directions in Aesthetics series.
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This second edition of The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals was edited by his son Francis Darwin and published in 1890. As Sir Francis notes in his brief preface, because the first edition did not sell out in Charles Darwin’s lifetime, ‘he had no opportunity of publishing the material collected with a view to a second edition.’ This material, in the form of ‘a mass of letters, extracts from and references to books’ was utilised in the second edition, as were Darwin’s pencilled corrections in his own volume of the first. The book is a study of the muscular movements of the face (both human and animal) triggered by the emotions being felt - a ‘physical’ response to a ‘mental’ sensation. Darwin’s detailed analysis of what actually happens to a body in a state of fear, or joy, or anger is illustrated by photographic images.
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