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Crossing the line: Restitution and cultural equity

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... Several scholars have sought to unpack types of state apologies ( Weyeneth 2001 ;Kampf and Löwenheim 2012 ) and justifications for their (non)emergence ( Brooks 1999 ;Gibney et al. 2007 ;Nobles 2008 ;Löwenheim 2009 ;Lind 2010 ;Adams and Kampf 2020 ). Restitution, in contrast, represents the material act of giving back objects to their morally and (often) legally rightful owners ( O'Donnell 2011 ;Besterman 2014 ;Tythacott and Arvanitis 2014 ;Gaudenzi and Swenson 2017 ), which can have powerful effects on the communities to which (sometimes sacred) objects are returned. This makes restitution's justice potential even more powerful since "museums are in a unique position of being custodians of the material manifestations of appropriation that opens up practical avenues to 'make it good'" ( Besterman 2014 , 24). ...
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