Article

Auteurism and game localization — revisiting translational approaches: Film quotations in multimedia interactive entertainment

Article

Auteurism and game localization — revisiting translational approaches: Film quotations in multimedia interactive entertainment

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Abstract

In the fertile ground between cinema and video games, Hideo Kojima’s Metal Gear Solid saga stands out for its auteur ’s clear tendency to use film language and aesthetics and for his evident inspiration from pop culture and the American cinematic tradition. Moreover, the series is rich in quotations meant to pay tribute to cinema and communicate with movie-cultured players intertextually. With regard to the process of localization, auteurist references to film culture represent a constraint for translators rendering Kojima’s game into different languages for a Metal Gear Solid -educated audience. This paper presents a comparative analysis of some film quotations in their English into Italian and Spanish localizations of Kojima’s Metal Gear Solid series in order to demonstrate the importance of loyalty to the game experience as a whole within a translational-cultural approach to localization.

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... Discussions about video game localization problems circumnavigate around culture specifics and culturalization (Di Marco, 2007;Dietz, 2007;Carlson and Corliss, 2010;Edwards, 2011), auteurism (Pettini, 2015), ludology (O'Hagan, 2005;Chandler, 2005;Mangiron and O'Hagan, 2013;Purnomo, 2015;Purnomo and Untari, 2015;), narratology (Corliss, 2011), spatial problems (Mangiron and O'Hagan, 2006), and legal issues and norms (Thayer and Kolko, 2004;Mandiberg, 2015). This research focuses on ludological perspectives with the emphasis on the asset constructing structures, the gap left in the previous research from ludological perspectives. ...
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Aquest article presenta els diferents tipus de text que poden trobar els traductors quan treballen per a la indústria del software d'entreteniment multimèdia interactiu i explica que els videojocs exigeixen habilitats diferents als traductors, com ara conèixer les memòries de traducció, ser capaços de cercar informació i ser creatius.
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