Article

A moratorium on silicofluoride usage will save $$millions

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Abstract

Lead, a toxin that lowers dopamine function, has been associated with violent behavior as well as learning deficits. Hydrofluosilicic acid and sodium silicofluoride, which were substituted for sodium fluoride without testing as chemicals for public water treatment, increase absorption of lead from the environment and are associated with violent behavior. Given the costs of incarcerating violent criminals, these side-effects justify a moratorium on using silicofluorides for water treatment until they are shown to be safe.

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... Over a decade, Roger Masters, Myron Coplan, and colleagues analyzed raw data on blood lead levels collected by researchers in Massachusetts [1,29,52,[57][58][59][60]62,[165][166][167][168], New York state [58], and ultimately the National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (NHANES) children's lead study [167]. Because for many years NHANES has asked every physician who sees young children to collect blood samples for measuring blood lead levels, replication using their data from all U.S. counties with over 500,000 population is especially important. ...
... Could this silence be entirely justified by the government's approval without testing by law in 1976 (but secretly much earlier to conceal their use in nuclear weapons development) on the "assumption" that the silicofluorides would "dissociate" into fluoride, silicon, and either hydrogen (from H 2 SiF 6 ) or sodium (from Na 2 SiF 6 )? Despite at least a dozen peer reviewed scientific publications documenting harmful interactions between silicofluorides, lead, and manganese since 1999 [1,28,29,52,[57][58][59][60][61][62][165][166][167], hardly anyone noted that silicate residues have been linked to harmful outcomes, especially due to interaction with other toxicants. ...
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Despite enjoying a high standard of living, the United States ranks 46th among nations reporting infant survival rates to the World Health Organization. Among factors that increase infant mortality are environmental toxicants. Toxic metals such as mercury, aluminum, and lead interact synergistically with uoride compounds to produce metal fuoride complexes (e.g., AlF3 and AlF4−). Such toxicants act as biophosphate mimetics disrupting biological signaling processes governing development, immune defenses, and ordinary maintenance systems. Sources for the metals include mother’s mercury amalgams, mercury and aluminum in injected medicines, and lead contaminated drinking water. All of them are made even more toxic by fuorides as evidenced recently by water contamination in Flint, Michigan. Fluorides interact with other toxins increasing their harmful impact. Among the interactants are glyphosate and phosphate containing fertilizers that end up in the food and water because of their widespread use in agriculture. The negative synergy for neonates in the U.S. is increased by the hepatitis B injection containing both mercury and aluminum, and infant formula contaminated with aluminum and the glyphosate in genetically modified soy milk reconstituted with water containing fluoride, aluminum, lead, and other toxic substances. The harmful interactions of such chemicals are associated with rising infant mortality in the U.S. We propose, therefore, a modest but urgent policy change: under TSCA §5, silicofluoride addition to public water supplies should be suspended.
... Over a decade, Roger Masters, Myron Coplan, and colleagues analyzed raw data on blood lead levels collected by researchers in Massachusetts [1,29,52,[57][58][59][60]62,[165][166][167][168], New York state [58], and ultimately the National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (NHANES) children's lead study [167]. Because for many years NHANES has asked every physician who sees young children to collect blood samples for measuring blood lead levels, replication using their data from all U.S. counties with over 500,000 population is especially important. ...
... Could this silence be entirely justified by the government's approval without testing by law in 1976 (but secretly much earlier to conceal their use in nuclear weapons development) on the "assumption" that the silicofluorides would "dissociate" into fluoride, silicon, and either hydrogen (from H 2 SiF 6 ) or sodium (from Na 2 SiF 6 )? Despite at least a dozen peer reviewed scientific publications documenting harmful interactions between silicofluorides, lead, and manganese since 1999 [1,28,29,52,[57][58][59][60][61][62][165][166][167], hardly anyone noted that silicate residues have been linked to harmful outcomes, especially due to interaction with other toxicants. ...
Article
Full-text available
p>Despite enjoying a high standard of living, the United States ranks 46th among nations reporting infant survival rates to the World Health Organization. Among factors that increase infant mortality are environmental toxicants. Toxic metals such as mercury, aluminum, and lead interact synergistically with fluoride compounds to produce metal fluoride complexes (e.g., AlF3 and AlF4−). Such toxicants act as biophosphate mimetics disrupting biological signaling processes governing development, immune defenses, and ordinary maintenance systems. Sources for the metals include mother’s mercury amalgams, mercury and aluminum in injected medicines, and lead contaminated drinking water. All of them are made even more toxic by fluorides as evidenced recently by water contamination in Flint, Michigan. Fluorides interact with other toxins increasing their harmful impact. Among the interactants are glyphosate and phosphate containing fertilizers that end up in the food and water because of their widespread use in agriculture. The negative synergy for neonates in the U.S. is increased by the hepatitis B injection containing both mercury and aluminum, and infant formula contaminated with aluminum and the glyphosate in genetically modified soy milk reconstituted with water containing fluoride, aluminum, lead, and other toxic substances. The harmful interactions of such chemicals are associated with rising infant mortality in the U.S. We propose, therefore, a modest but urgent policy change: under TSCA §5, silicofluoride addition to public water supplies should be suspended. </p
... Over a decade, Roger Masters, Myron Coplan, and colleagues analyzed raw data on blood lead levels collected by researchers in Massachusetts [1,29,52,[57][58][59][60]62,[165][166][167][168], New York state [58], and ultimately the National Health and Nutritional Evaluation Survey (NHANES) children's lead study [167]. Because for many years NHANES has asked every physician who sees young children to collect blood samples for measuring blood lead levels, replication using their data from all U.S. counties with over 500,000 population is especially important. ...
... Could this silence be entirely justified by the government's approval without testing by law in 1976 (but secretly much earlier to conceal their use in nuclear weapons development) on the "assumption" that the silicofluorides would "dissociate" into fluoride, silicon, and either hydrogen (from H 2 SiF 6 ) or sodium (from Na 2 SiF 6 )? Despite at least a dozen peer reviewed scientific publications documenting harmful interactions between silicofluorides, lead, and manganese since 1999 [1,28,29,52,[57][58][59][60][61][62][165][166][167], hardly anyone noted that silicate residues have been linked to harmful outcomes, especially due to interaction with other toxicants. ...
Article
Full-text available
Despite enjoying a high standard of living, the United States ranks 46th among nations reporting infant survival rates to the World Health Organization. Among factors that increase infant mortality are environmental toxicants. Toxic metals such as mercury, aluminum, and lead interact synergistically with fluoride compounds to produce metal fluoride complexes (e.g., AlF3 and AlF4−). Such toxicants act as biophosphate mimetics disrupting biological signaling processes governing development, immune defenses, and ordinary maintenance systems. Sources for the metals include mother’s mercury amalgams, mercury and aluminum in injected medicines, and lead contaminated drinking water. All of them are made even more toxic by fluorides as evidenced recently by water contamination in Flint, Michigan. Fluorides interact with other toxins increasing their harmful impact. Among the interactants are glyphosate and phosphate containing fertilizers that end up in the food and water because of their widespread use in agriculture. The negative synergy for neonates in the U.S. is increased by the hepatitis B injection containing both mercury and aluminum, and infant formula contaminated with aluminum and the glyphosate in genetically modified soy milk reconstituted with water containing fluoride, aluminum, lead, and other toxic substances. The harmful interactions of such chemicals are associated with rising infant mortality in the U.S. We propose, therefore, a modest but urgent policy change: under TSCA §5, silicofluoride addition to public water supplies should be suspended.
Article
Although there is increasing recognition that many dysfunctional behaviors and diseases require multifactorial explanations that integrate biological and socio-cultural variables, such an approach requires fundamental conceptual changes. To explain geographical and temporal variations in alcohol and drug abuse and in criminal behavior, we propose a dynamic, multifactorial model that integrates findings in neurobiology and social science with toxicology. This model is based on a sequence of probabilistic relationships. (1) Some individuals are potential alcoholics or drug addicts for genetic or developmental reasons that may also be associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), antisocial personality, or other traits that have been linked to criminal behavior. (2) Uptake of lead, manganese, and other neurotoxic substances from the environment can downregulate dopamine, glutamate, serotonin, and other neurotransmitters necessary for learning and normal impulse control. (3) Uptake of lead and other neurotoxins is increased by dietary deficits in calcium, zinc, and iron which in turn are associated with poverty, stress, and lactose intolerance. (4) Additional environmental factors, such as silicofluoride use in treatment of public water supplies, also increase uptake of lead. (5) Fetal and childhood uptake of lead and other toxins is associated with both developmental and learning deficits and with continued neurotoxicity during teenage and young adult years. (6) Alcohol and drug abuse can function as crude self-medication to compensate for downregulation of serotonin, dopamine and other affected neurotransmitters. (7) Lead neurotoxicity increases the market for alcohol and hence the total number of active alcoholics. (8) This increase in a community's market size reflects prolonged recruitment of potential alcohol users (higher average age of first use of alcohol is correlated to size of market for alcohol). (9) Larger markets for alcohol lead to larger markets for cocaine and crack. (10) These linked markets are a key factor in different rates of crime, since higher average age of first use of alcohol, of cocaine, or of crack is associated with a higher rate of crime and more criminals who were using cocaine or crack at the time of their offense. When otherwise unexplained geographical and historical differences in rates of crime are analyzed from this perspective, environmental pollution and the use of silicofluorides in water treatment seem to play a critical role in triggering social dysfunction. This dynamic, multifactorial approach may provide a model for studying the epidemiology of other dysfunctional behaviors and diseases, such as ADD/ADHD, asthma, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease, which have been traced to varied combinations of genetic vulnerabilities, toxic metals, developmental insults, and social stresses.
Article
Toxic metals like lead, manganese, copper and cadmium damage neurons and deregulate neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine (which are essential to normal impulse control and learning). Earlier studies show that — controlling for socio‐economic and demographic factors — environmental pollution with lead is a highly significant risk factor in predicting higher rates of crime, attention deficit disorder or hyperactivity, and learning disabilities. Exposure and uptake of lead has been associated with industrial pollution, leaded paint and plumbing systems in old housing, lead residues in soil, dietary habits (such as shortages of calcium and iron), and demographic factors (such as poverty, stress, and minority ethnicity). We report here on an additional “risk co‐factor” making lead and other toxic metals in the environment more dangerous to local residents: the use of silicofluorides as agents in water treatment. The two chemicals in question — fluosilicic acid and sodium silicofluoride — are toxins that, despite claims to the contrary, do not dissociate completely and change water chemistry when used under normal water treatment practices. As a result, water treatment with siliconfluorides apparently functions to increase the cellular uptake of lead. Data from lead screening of over 280,000 children in Massachusetts indicates that silicofluoride usage is associated with significant increases in average lead in children's blood as well as percentage of children with blood lead in excess of 10μg/dL. Consistent with the hypothesized role of silicofluorides as enhancing uptake of lead whatever the source of exposure, children are especially at risk for higher blood lead in those communities with more old housing or lead in excess of 15 ppb in first draw water samples where silicofluorides are also in use. Preliminary findings from county‐level data in Georgia confirm that silicofluoride usage is associated with higher levels of lead in children's blood. In both Massachusetts and Georgia, moreover, behaviors associated with lead nurotoxicity are more frequent in communities using silicofluorides than in comparable localities that do not use these chemicals. Because there has been insufficient animal or human testing of silicofluoride treated water, further study of the effect of silicofluorides is needed to clarify the extent to which these chemicals are risk co‐factors for lead uptake and the hazardous effects it produces.