ChapterPDF Available

Paradigm shift to the integrative big five trait taxonomy: History, measurement, and conceptual issues

Authors:
Chapter

Paradigm shift to the integrative big five trait taxonomy: History, measurement, and conceptual issues

A preview of the PDF is not available
... and the preregistration for Study 2 can be found at https://osf.io/pu2wd/. systematic relations between the three factors underlying moral-dilemma judgments and several personality traits from the HEXACO (Ashton & Lee, 2007) and Big Five trait models (John et al., 2008). ...
... The purpose of the current research was to add to this line of work by replicating prior relations between basic personality traits and different factors underlying moral-dilemma judgments. To this end, the current research assessed basic personality traits according to the Big Five model (John et al., 2008), comprising the personality dimensions of extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. Following prior research in this area (Kroneisen & Heck, 2020;Luke & Gawronski, 2022), we analyzed moral-dilemma judgments using the CNI model (Gawronski et al., 2017), which enabled the independent quantification of individual differences in sensitivity to consequences, sensitivity to moral norms, and general preference for inaction versus action in responses to moral dilemmas. ...
... While this research has considered a range of potential sources of disagreement in moral-dilemma judgments, basic personality traits have received comparatively less attention. Personality traits such as those found in the Big Five model (John et al., 2008) or the HEXACO model (Ashton et al., 2014) have been related to instances of morally relevant behavior (for a review, see and other aspects of moral judgment (e.g., Alper & Yilmaz, 2019;Hirsh et al., 2010;Lewis & Bates, 2011). Yet, only a small number of studies have investigated relations between basic personality traits and responses to moral dilemmas. ...
Article
Full-text available
A growing line of research suggests that disagreement in moral-dilemma judgments may be rooted in basic personality traits. Using the CNI model, two preregistered studies (N = 490) aimed to replicate findings of prior exploratory research on relations between the Big Five and sensitivity to consequences (C), sensitivity to moral norms (N), and general preference for inaction versus action (I) in responses to moral dilemmas. While only one of six previously obtained relations replicated in an undergraduate student sample (Study 1), all six relations replicated in an MTurk worker sample (Study 2). The results highlight the importance of examining the generalizability of relations between basic personality traits and moral judgments in diverse samples for the reproducibility of psychological findings.
... The model proposes the five trait factors of Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism (Gurven et al., 2013;John et al., 2008;McCrae, 2011;Silva & Nakano, 2011;Yarkoni, 2010;Wright, 2017) by creating the common acronym "OCEAN". The five primary personality traits in all versions of BFI Inventories are extraversion also often spelled extroversion (Cherry, 2022). ...
... The Big Five Inventory (BFI) is a self-report scale that was developed to measure the big five personality traits. The scale was developed based on the Big Five Inventory 44-short phrases (BFI-44) that the respondent answers on a five-point rating scale, ranging from 1 (disagree strongly) to 5 (agree strongly) to measure personality traits (John, Donahue, & Kentle, 1991;Rammstedt, 1997, John, Naumann, & Soto, 2008. ...
Article
Full-text available
The study's primary purpose was to explore the differences between mature male and female students based on extroversion and introversion personality types studying an undergraduate business programme in a private higher education institution in the UK. The Big Five Inventory-BFI (a short form with 10 items), BFI-10, was used to collect data from adult participants (N=131). The sample data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26. The researchers used descriptive statistics and graphical representation to describe the data and gain meaningful insights. The results revealed no significant differences between males and females based on the mean extroversion score. The detailed results for all five-personality dimensions for both genders showed that female participants were higher on neuroticism/emotional stability and agreeableness than males. Also, male participants' mean scores of Extraversion, Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience were almost similar. Previous research has shown females to be high on some facets of conscientiousness. However, these results are inconsistent across cultures, and no significant gender differences in conscientiousness have been found.
... Although there are several classifications of individuals, only those related to consumer behavior are of economic interest. The most well-known and widely used model for classifying personality traits, known as the Big Five, can be traced to the work of Costa and McCrae (Costa & McCrae, 1976;John et al., 2010;McCrae & John, 1992;Roberts, et al., 2006). For marketers and consumer researchers, psychological traits can be useful only when they are predictable. ...
... Aaker (1997) used facets of the Big Five to create a brand personality scale with the goal of achieving as close a match as possible between brand or product personality and consumer personality. Borghans et al. (2008) John et al. (2010) and Valchev et al. (2013), they are habitual patterns of behavior, thought, and emotion that are stable over time and in comparable situations. What all definitions have in common is "the emphasis on the relative consistency of behavioral predispositions to behave in a particular manner across situations" (Fischer, 2018). ...
Article
Full-text available
In purchase behavior research, the personal dispositions of consumers can play a decisive role. This becomes relevant especially in very narrow target groups when socio-demographic constraints are very similar. In the present study, three types of continuity and change in the Big Five personality traits are investigated. While the Big Five personality traits have been extensively studied at the population level over the last decades, there is very little research at the individual level. This study is intended to fill the gap by investigating individual change and ipsative stability using representative panel data. Across four assessments, separated by four years, of the German SocioEconomic Panel (SOEP) from 2005 to 2017, a total of 58,502 participants (ages 16-103, 53% female) completed a 16-item personality short test. An exploratory structural equation analysis revealed very good model fit over age in all four observations. Individual change of a trait is examined by Asendorpf's IS indicator while ipsative stability is measured by the double-entry intra-class correlation coefficient. The results showed that in both domains, stability showed an inverse u-shape with a peak between the ages of 40 and 50.
... We use the terms introversion and neuroticism according to the categorisation introduced by the Big Five Personality Traits(John et al. 2008). ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Socially assistive robots provide physical and mental assistance for humans via cognitive human-machine interactions. These robots should sustain long-term engaging interactions with humans in a similar way humans interact with each other. According to the theory of mind, in their interactions humans develop cognitive models of each other in order to estimate their unobservable state-of-mind, predict their behavior, and act accordingly. Based on the theory of mind, we propose mathematical cognitive models of humans, which enable machines to understand cognitive procedures of humans in general and as distinct individuals. In particular, a network representation that is formulated based on a proposed extended version of fuzzy cognitive maps is introduced. The resulting models are identified and validated using (1) computer-based simulations designed according to a general data set of human's intuitive reasoning and literature and (2) real-life personalised experiments with 15 human participants. The results of the experiments show that the proposed cognitive models can excellently be personalised to different participants and precisely estimate and predict their current and future state-of-mind and expected behaviors.
... For the last several years, researchers have tested the validity of the Big Five factors using numerous diverse samples and situations. This gives researchers a solid foundation for believing in the value of the Big Five factors as a measure of individuals' personalities and differences in personality (John et al., 2008). Personality characteristics that can be linked to virtual team characteristics are being investigated by researchers. ...
Article
Full-text available
This research paper explores the implications of emotional intelligence and the Big Five personality model on virtual team effectiveness. It illustrates how emotional intelligence and Big Five personality traits help team members better understand interpersonal relationships and develop constructive virtual teams. The widespread use of virtual team meetings for collaborative work over in-person interaction with diverse personalities creates discord and trust among team members, limiting overall productivity. A quantitative analysis approach is used, with hypotheses tested and a series of multiple linear regression analyses performed on data collected from relevant industries using convenient sampling. The findings show that the Big Five personality affects the virtual team's trust and collaboration parameters. However, the relationship between personality traits and team effectiveness is mediated by emotional intelligence. Also, it is explored that having control over emotional intelligence or developing emotional intelligence would improve team performance while managing and working with a diverse group of people.
... These personality characteristics are possibly considered risk factors for substance use, considering their connection with impulsive behaviors, lack of inhibitory control, and lack of planning. On the other hand, openness concerns exploratory behaviors and the importance of living new experiences daily (John et al., 2008). Individuals with problematic substance use certainly have difficulty in changing some behaviors and dynamics related to substance use and can impair changes in life and habits in general. ...
Article
This study aimed to characterize the personality traits of individuals with substance use disorders to verify the association and predictive value of personality traits for psychopathological symptoms and impulsivity. The participants were 77 adults undergoing treatment at a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drug, who completed a sociodemographic and clinical data questionnaire, the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, the Adult Self-Report (ASR), and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). Most participants presented very low/low scores on extroversion and openness factors. The five personality factors revealed significant associations with most ASR subscales and BIS-11. High rates of neuroticism and low levels of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness are related to a greater occurrence of symptoms of anxiety, depression, attention, problems of thought and social isolation, somatic complaints, aggressive behavior, and impulsivity. According to the regression models, conscientiousness and neuroticism factors were more significant for symptoms related to anxiety/depression, thought problems, and rule-breaking behavior.
... NEO Extraversion includes a Warmth facet, whereas lexically based Big Five measures (including the BFI and BFI-2, as well as the Big Five Mini-Markers) locate warmth vs. coldness within the Agreeableness domain, or interstitial between Extraversion and Agreeableness. Thus, NEO Extraversion tends to show lower convergent correlations with other Big Five measures, as well as positive correlations with measures of Agreeableness (e.g., John et al., 2008). ...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to realize a French adaptation of the Big Five Inventory-2 (BFI-2), and to further examine the BFI-2’s convergent and discriminant validity via a comparison with the NEO-PI-3 and with the syndromes assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R). Bifactor Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling almost fully supported the BFI-2’s factor structure and measurement model with five major factors, 15 facets, and an acquiescence method factor. All the scales measuring the major factors showed excellent reliability and almost all the scales measuring facets showed acceptable to excellent reliability and satisfactory metric and scalar invariance across gender. The BFI-2 domains and facets were found to be strongly correlated with the scales of the NEO-PI-3 measuring similar constructs. The BFI-2 Negative Emotionality domain and its facets were positively related to most of the SCL-90-R scales, and Extraversion and its facets related negatively with Interpersonal Sensitivity and Depression. In conclusion, data from the French adaptation confirmed the relevance of the BFI-2 hierarchical factor structure, as well as its scales’ reliability and convergent and discriminant validity, which supports and extends the body of knowledge from the original American BFI-2 and its Danish, Dutch, German, Russian, and Slovakian adaptations.
... For some authors, soft-skills refer to an individual's mindset, i.e. a combination of qualities, personality traits and attitudes that can help in conflict management (Tsey et al., 2018). Others define soft-skills as a set of constructs that differentiate individuals (Borghans et al., 2008;Koch et al., 2015) and use the Big Five personality traits to classify them (John & Srivastava, 1999;Heckman et al., 2006;Borghans et al., 2008;John et al., 2008;Almlund et al., 2011;Becker et al., 2012;Heckman et al., 2013;Flinn et al., 2018;Zamarro et al., 2018;Kosse et al., 2020). For example, John and Srivastava (1999) defined the "Big Five" personality dimensions, a taxonomy in which they summarised five personality domains. ...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, many studies have referred to the interdependence between cognitive (hard-skills) and students’ academic performance. However, despite their relevance, soft-skills have not received the same treatment and have not been analysed as extensively, particularly from a gender perspective. Therefore, and bearing in mind that analysing from a gender perspective is essential to reduce occupational segregation and soft-skills can enhance young people’s personal and academic development, throughout this paper we have analysed the gender gap in soft-skills with a sample of 15–16 years old students from the Spanish region of Andalusia. To do so, we have used a recent innovation of the Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition technique. Our results show not only that the gender gap in soft-skills is correlated with gender stereotypes, but also that grade retention or being an immigrant show a greater degree of association with boys’ soft-skills than girls’, while mothers’ educational level is more correlated with the soft-skills of girls.
... We measured the Big Five personality traits using the Big Five Inventory (John et al., 2008) which consists of 44 items measuring: Extraversion (8 items) (a = 0.78), Agreeableness (9 items) (a = 0.75), Conscientiousness (9 items) (a = 0.83), Neuroticism (8 items) (a = 0.86) and Openness to experience (10 items) (a = 0.81). All the items were scored on a Likert scale with five response options (1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree). ...
Article
In this research, we proposed Life history theory as an underlying framework that should explain the link between personality and driving aggression. We hypothesized that agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and the Dark Triad traits would mediate the relationship between fast life history strategies and aggressive driving. We relied on 448 participants (Mage = 31.75, SD = 12.08, 66.5 % women) that completed measures of life history strategies, Big Five factors, the Dark Triad traits, and driving aggression. We found that individuals high in fast life history strategies were also high in driving aggression. Those high in neuroticism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy were aggressive behind the wheel and those high in agreeableness and conscientiousness were low in driving aggression. Psychopathy mediated the relationship between fast life history strategies and driving aggression. This may be explained by the fact that personality traits are broad behavioral adaptations that reflect life history strategies. In other words, life history strategies do not properly exist on their own on the behavioral level. They express behaviorally in terms of stable, cross-situational personality traits.
Article
Full-text available
Plain English Summary Identifying entrepreneurial personalities — an improved person-centred approach to the Big Five personality traits advances our understanding of self-employment decisions. Previous studies emphasize a positive influence of the personality traits extraversion and openness on entrepreneurship. The present paper shows that the interaction of personality traits is also important. A resilient personality type that combines high values in the aforementioned traits with higher levels of conscientiousness, agreeableness and emotional stability has a positive impact on the likelihood to become self-employed. We also show that a resilient personality type explains self-employment decisions beyond what can already be explained by profiling, another person-centred Big Five approach. As a practical implication, advice from career or start-up consultants should not be based on profiling alone. Otherwise, too many entrepreneurs may be discouraged from their entrepreneurial endeavours. Generally speaking, self-employment decisions should incorporate personality aspects only as one among many relevant factors.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.