Article

Deep vein thrombosis after surgery

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Abstract

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a significant, potentially fatal complication following surgery. Certain orthopaedic procedures, such as hip or knee arthroplasty, present a greater risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than others. These surgical risks are further compounded by individual patient risk factors. In the event of a DVT, treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) should be initiated on diagnosis, followed by initiation of oral anticoagulant therapy. Once the LMWH is discontinued, anticoagulation with warfarin should be continued for a period of time, to be determined by assessing the individual's risk of VTE recurrence.

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... Ancak orta derecede ya da yüksek DVT riskine sahip cerrahi hastaları için de profilaksi uygulanması zorunludur (1,13,21). Yapılan araştırmalar uzun dönem DVT tedavisinde DMAH'lerin, diğer tedavi seçeneklerine oranla tedavi üstünlüğü olduğunu göstermektedir (22,23). Cerrahi hastalarında profilaktik tedavi en az hastanede yatış süresi (7-10 gün) kadar olmalıdır. ...
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