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Chapter 7 Image schema

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... These are all very frequent, as they all constitute a part of the stopwords from NLTK's corpus package (https://www.nltk.org/_modules/nltk/corpus.html; last accessed on 21 December 2021). When present in utterances, they often manifest the underlying image schemata well known from the Conceptual Metaphor Theory first popularized by Lakoff and Johnson in [54] and further described in detail by other authors, for example by Gibbs in [55]. Admittedly, the choice of the words from the outside of the major parts of speech category is subjective and could be made differently. ...
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