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World of warcraft in the classroom: A research study on social interaction empowerment in secondary schools

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World of warcraft in the classroom: A research study on social interaction empowerment in secondary schools

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of playing the online game World of Warcraft (WoW) on adolescents' social interaction and competence when played at school, in a class of teenagers. The research involved 7 classes from the first course at the Liceo Scientifico Statale "Marconi" (Milano, Italy). We analysed, from a pedagogical and psychosocial approach, the social interaction within the game environment, integrating qualitative and quantitative methods: ethnographic analysis, direct observation, and social network analysis (SNA). The results showed that the group experience and the cooperation required by this video game, allowed the classes to interact in a controlled environment, where they experienced social ties, roles and responsibilities, in turn influencing their social relationships outside the game.

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... The most popular type of MMOG, and the sub-genre that pioneered the category, is the Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game (MMORPG). An MMORPG is " an immersive 3D worlds where hundreds or thousands of players connect simultaneously from all over the world in order to meet each other in a simulated reality " [11]. Many MMORPGs offer support for in-game guilds or clans, that are groups of players coming together to share knowledge, resources, manpower to reach common goals. ...
... Many MMORPGs offer support for in-game guilds or clans, that are groups of players coming together to share knowledge, resources, manpower to reach common goals. For example, World of Warcraft [11] is a MMORPG set in a fantasy world (like The Lords of the Rings). The aim of the game is to conduct a series of missions, so-called quests, with progressive levels of difficulty. ...
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