Article

Eualuation of CO2 fractional laser effect on the skin by confocal microscopy

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Abstract

The physical principle of the efficacy and the reduced risk of CO 2 fractional lasers is the generation of controlled columns of thermal damage, the so-called Microthermal zones (MTZ) or DOT. These require certain specific characteristics of emission so to ensure the maximum efficacy and minimum unwanted skin damage. The stimulation effect of collagen and skin rejuvenation are due to the depth of the thermal damage in dermal layers, which triggers the generation of new collagen and repair tissue. The objective of this study has been to evaluate the effect of a CO2 fractional laser (SmartXide, Deka) on the epidermal and dermal layers and the use of confocal microscopy together with the fractional mode (DOT on) system, to determine in vivo the maximum depth of the laser thermal effect. The fractional mode, with also an interlaced scan mode, uses the "Stack" parameter to multiply the depth of the pulses in tissues up to the deepest layers while the parameters of potency remain unchanged, and to determine the spot diameter in skin tissue from the surface to the depth. Our study has demonstrated that the SmartXide CO2 fractional laser, with the use of conservative settings, emits pulses with a regular shape in the whole columns. By changing the emission to penetrate into depth (DOT On mode, Stack On), it is possible to highlight the thermal damage to a depth up to more than 400 μm.

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