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Passive performance and building form: An optimization framework for early-stage design support

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To achieve low and zero net energy performance objectives in buildings, designers must make optimal use of passive environmental design strategies. The objective of this research is to demonstrate the application of a novel Passive Performance Optimization Framework (PPOF) to improve the performance of daylighting, solar control, and natural ventilation strategies in the early design stages of architectural projects. The PPOF is executed through a novel, simulation-based parametric modeling workflow capable of optimizing building geometry, building orientation, fenestration configurations, and other building parameters in response to program requirements, site-specific building adjacencies, and climate-based daylighting and whole-building energy use performance metrics. The applicability of the workflow is quantified by comparing results from the workflow to an ASHRAE 90.1 compliant reference model for four different climate zones, incorporating real sites and urban overshadowing conditions. Results show that the PPOF can deliver between a 4% and 17% reduction in Energy Use Intensity (EUI) while simultaneously improving daylighting performance by between 27% and 65% depending on the local site and climatic conditions. The PPOF and simulation-based workflow help to make generative modeling, informed by powerful energy and lighting simulation engines, more accessible to designers working on regular projects and schedules to create high-performance buildings.
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... -Les approches d'optimisation basées sur un flux exploitant des outils de modélisation et des outils de simulation [5,8,14,3]. -Les approches d'optimisation reposant sur une modélisation paramétrique permettant d'optimiser des alternatives de conception [11,1], ou encore de générer des masses paramétriques utiles à l'exploration des alternatives de conception [17,18]. ...
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La compétence en Simulations de la Performance Energétique (SPE) est un atout fondamental pour un architecte. Être capable de lire des résultats de simulation et d'adapter sa conception en conséquence est devenu une capacité essentielle chez les architectes diplômés. Cependant, enseigner la SPE aux étudiants peut être difficile, souvent en raison de la complexité des logiciels et des méthodes, mais aussi de la multitude des informations qui entrent en jeu. Afin de sensibiliser au rôle des outils BIM dans l'amélioration de la performance énergétique, cet article propose et expérimente une approche d'optimisation simplifiée basée sur trois différentes méthodes de simulation qui dépendent de la phase de conception en question et du niveau de maitrise des étudiants cibles. L'expérimentation de ces méthodes a démontré leur capacité à guider la prise de décision vers une conception plus performante et plus respectueuse de son environnement et a suggéré une expérimentation future plus globale de l'approche proposée.
... The first 25 simulation iterations of an optimization conducted at the early design phases.Source:Konis, K., A. Gamas, and K. Kensek (2016). Passive performance and building form: An optimization framework for early-stage design support. ...
Thesis
During the last decades, the increasing need to ensure building performance during architectural design practices has led to highly interactive relations between architecture and various other disciplines, in which performance concepts are tightly integrated into the building design process. Computational tools supporting performative architectural design processes make this interdisciplinary integration possible. The critical consequence of the early consideration of performative principles and the collaborative synthesis process is widely emphasized both in theory and practice. This research aims to contribute to the current understanding of performance-based architectural design practices by investigating the key performance concepts, supporting computational tools and finally the current practices of performative design through case studies. The main research aim is to explore, understand and conceptualize the performative architectural design and the existing practices. It is also aimed to demonstrate the integrated design strategies along with the potentials of computational design throughout the design process including early phases.
... Urban building energy consumption is the total energy consumption of buildings in the city, including Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning energy consumption (Sadineni et al., 2011;Nguyen et al., 2014) lighting energy consumption, the electrical energy consumption of sockets, etc., which can account for the total energy consumption 30-40% of the whole society (Li et al., 2011;Nguyen et al., 2014;Zhu et al., 2020) (that is, the sum of all energy consumption of industry, agriculture, and residents, etc.). The energy performance of a building depends on the building envelopes, especially windows, which frequently let in or let out energy and are responsible for 20-40% of wasted energy in a building (Hee et al., 2015;Konis et al., 2016). The energy saving potentials of windows are important determinants in building energy saving, and window glazing selection is one of the crucial issues in designing windows. ...
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