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Job Satisfaction among School Teachers

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Attracting and retaining high quality teachers is a primary necessity as well as a challenge for educational institutions. While intrinsic factors play a significant role in motivating individuals to enter the teaching profession, extrinsic conditions can influence their job satisfaction and desire to remain in teaching. In addition, demographic factors and teacher specific and school specific characteristics also affect job satisfaction.This study is an evaluative and diagnostic attempt to discover empirically the nature of relationships between job satisfaction and different factors, as well as independent aspects of job satisfaction. The sample comprised 120 school teachers working in government and private schools in Jammu city. The questionnaire covered six aspects of the job: principal’s behaviour, society and colleagues’ behaviour, work itself, pay and rewards, growth opportunities and recognition, and students’ behaviour and others. The analysis revealed that each of these aspects played a role in job satisfaction. The degree of job satisfaction secured by teachers is not high and the reason lies in insufficient pay. Secondary level teachers are more satisfied than primary level teachers. Contrary to expectation, private school teachers are more satisfied than government school teachers despite the poor pay package, due to the congenial atmosphere in the private schools. Female teachers are more satisfied due to the nature of the job and the socio-cultural value of the profession. The level of education inversely affects the pay satisfaction of the employees working at the same level. Satisfaction with teaching as a career, not merely as a job, is an important policy issue since it is associated with teacher effectiveness, which ultimately affects student achievement.
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... A recent study found some job factors like salary, the working hours of the schools, and resources available on the campus increase the satisfaction level of the teachers in the government schools of Ludhiana (Kaur and Sharma 2015). A similar study detect non-government school teachers are more satisfied than government school teachers due to the amiable environment (Sharma and Jyoti 2006) Quality of work life in the teaching profession delineates the quality of the connection between students, staff, and the total working environment. According to Ellickson and Logsdon (2001) having adequate working equipment, capital, and teaching prospect, and a reasonable workload all noticeably affect a teacher's job satisfaction. ...
... Further, it can be explained that at the primary level teachers has to work with children who sometimes cause the occurrence of stress and decreases satisfaction toward the job. In the support of the findings, it can be concluded by showing the evidence of Sharma and Jyoti (2006) that, characteristics of students' and teacher perceptions of controlling the classroom environment are factors affecting primary teacher satisfaction. ...
... The findings presented in table 2 yet again indicated that there was a significant difference among government and non-government school teachers in terms of their work commitment and work satisfaction respectively. The findings proved the third formulated hypothesis which is consistent with the findings of previous research was conducted by (Kaur and Sharma 2015;Sharma and Jyoti 2006). In Bangladesh, it can be seen that the government school teachers enjoyed their job as they get many kinds of facilities i.e. fixed salary, greater job security, working hour, availability of the resource, etc. during the job period which leads them committed to the job more effectively. ...
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The general purpose of the investigation was to find out the difference between the job-related constructs i.e. quality of work-life, work satisfaction, work stress, and work commitment according to few demographic factors i.e. primary-secondary, government-nongovernment, and urban-rural amongst the school teachers. A sample of 144 school teachers was purposively selected from some specific locations in Bangladesh. To measure, the selected variables a demographic sheet was developed by the researchers and adapted Bangla versions of the "Teachers' Work Stress Scale", "Teachers' Quality of Work-life Scale", "Teachers Work Satisfaction Scale, and "Teachers Work Commitment Scale" was employed for the current investigation. Four hypotheses were formulated to test in the present study. The findings of the t-test scores partially proved the hypotheses. Furthermore, the results of the current study demonstrated that the variables were positively correlated in terms of work-life quality, work commitment, and work satisfaction. So, the result suggests that some self-developmental prospects, short-range courses, seminars, workshops, endowing with high approval, and rewards for commendable work are some of the ways for achieving job satisfaction among teachers.
... Regarding the occupation level of teachers, i.e., whether they are teaching at a primary or secondary school level, research indicates that secondary teachers report significantly higher scores on job satisfaction than primary school teachers (e.g., Sharma and Jyoti, 2006). In contrast with this assumption, results of Allen (2005) show higher dissatisfaction levels for secondary school teachers. ...
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Starting with the COVID-19 pandemic, research intensively investigated the effects of school lockdowns on involved stakeholders, such as teachers, students and parents. However, as research projects had to be hurriedly conducted, in-depth and longitudinal studies are lacking. Therefore, the current study uses data from a longitudinal study to investigate the well-being of Austrian in-service teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic. In total 256 teachers took part at both measurement waves and participated in an online survey. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess teachers' perception of emotional experiences and job satisfaction before COVID-19 (retrospective, t1), during the first (in situ, t2) and during the second school lockdown (in situ, t3). The results indicated that the vast majority of teachers generally felt a high level of job satisfaction. However, teachers' satisfaction decreased between regular teaching and school lockdowns. Similarly, positive emotional activation was reduced and negative activation increased. Further, results from a positive activation cross-lagged path model indicated that the lack of positive activation led to lower job satisfaction. For negative emotional activation, job satisfaction during the first school lockdown predicted negative activation at the second lockdown.
... The foundation of an effective system is a high-performing skilled workforce. Attracting and maintaining high-quality teachers is also a prime need for a school (Sharma & Jyoti, 2006). Factors involved in the creation of quality teachers should be acknowledged. ...
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... Teachers tend to seek out positions where their efficiency matches with the efficiency of their peers. In addition, productive teachers tend to choose those schools where their work compatibility and intellectual interest align with their peer teachers to enhance their intellectual growth and professional development [24]. On the other side, there is some evidence that ambitious and qualified teachers might choose to transfer to schools where the work environment does not demand work efficiency and high-performance goals to achieve [25]. ...
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... There is a vast body of research proving the significant influence of principal leadership on especially teacher satisfaction (e.g. Tillman & Tillman, 2008;Sharma & Jyoti, 2006). It is understandable why teacher satisfaction has been discussed so much since unsatisfied teachers are likely to exhibit poor performance, which eventually leads to undesirable effects on student and school achievement. ...
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