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The Corporeal image: Film, ethnography, and the senses

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Abstract

In this book, David MacDougall, one of the leading ethnographic filmmakers and film scholars of his generation, builds upon the ideas from his widely praised Transcultural Cinema and argues for a new conception of how visual images create human knowledge in a world in which the value of seeing has often been eclipsed by words. In ten chapters, MacDougall explores the relations between photographic images and the human body-the body of the viewer and the body behind the camera as well as the body as seen in ethnography, cinema, and photography. In a landmark piece, he discusses the need for a new field of social aesthetics, further elaborated in his reflections on filming at an elite boys' school in northern India. The theme of the school is taken up as well in his discussion of fiction and nonfiction films of childhood. The book's final section presents a radical view of the history of visual anthropology as a maverick anthropological practice that was always at odds with the anthropology of words. In place of the conventional wisdom, he proposes a new set of principles for visual anthropology. These are essays in the classical sense--speculative, judicious, lucidly written, and mercifully jargon-free. The Corporeal Image presents the latest ideas from one of our foremost thinkers on the role of vision and visual representation in contemporary social thought.

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... Film is perceived as a powerful tool for representing experiences and communication of knowledge in an experiential way [23,24]. Film also has the ability to capture situations in a social and material context [23,24]. ...
... Film is perceived as a powerful tool for representing experiences and communication of knowledge in an experiential way [23,24]. Film also has the ability to capture situations in a social and material context [23,24]. In addition to the power of film as a medium, the process of filmmaking itself is often seen as an important part of the method, and it is held to be able to transform and empower the participants [22]. ...
... Apart from the insight into the various aspects of age-friendliness, the method of participatory video added to the collection of data that were unexpected and creative. According to MacDougall [23], exploring the neighborhood through the lens of a camera can provide participants with a new view, as one engages with the world in other ways. In this research, participants were conscious or became more aware of the age-friendliness of their environment. ...
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Participatory video design is a novel approach to collect experiences and perceptions of older people about the age-friendliness of their city or neighborhood. In this article, we describe how this co-creative method can add to specific knowledge about the preferences and needs of older people about the improvement or preservation of their environment. We describe two examples of this approach in the cities of The Hague and Leiden, the Netherlands. Persons of 60 years and older were invited to participate in a “workshop” on filmmaking focusing on age-friendly cities. A professional filmmaker and a researcher of the University of Applied Sciences worked in co-creation with older people, to produce short films on the topics that were perceived as important from the perspective of the participants. The older people worked in couples to produce their short films about the city or their neighborhood. Topics of the films included communication and information, outdoor spaces, social relations, and community support. The use of participatory video design can foster empowerment and social interaction among older participants, and insight into the preferences and needs of older people regarding age-friendly cities.
... The youth gaze methodology, first developed by anthropologist Trond Waage (2013), was inspired by methods from social anthropology in the actor-oriented tradition of and Barth (1969), and the craft of ethnographic filmmaking (MacDougall, 2006;Rouch, 1967;Rouch & Morin, 1961). This research has emanated from the emerging field of participatory research as well as what has been termed "the visual turn" in social sciences. ...
... Visual methods are powerful tools for eliciting individual experiences and thus offer new perspectives from which to view a phenomenon (Pink, 2007). These may include embodied aspects of experience as well as culturally inflicted relationships (MacDougall, 2006;Pink, 2006Pink, , 2007Stoller, 1997). Visual collaborative methodologies are often applied in youth research as tools to promote more empowering research relationships and to facilitate and complement ways of understanding across social, cultural and generational communication barriers (Chalfen and Rich, 2007;Johnson and Alderson, 2008;Waage, 2013Waage, , 2016. ...
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Persistent bodily symptoms without medical clarity creates many layers of uncertainty both for health professionals and for patients. In primary care, research has shown that clinical encounters of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) are highly contentious, sometimes causing adverse effects. However, little is known about communicative challenges for adolescents in specialist health care settings; i.e. how they give meaning to their experiences, and how they handle social, moral and existential concerns. The overall aims of the present study were to explore these specific challenges of young MUS sufferers, and direct attention to how health care practices might support the youth's developmental processes. More precisely, in three different sites where uncertainty arose and had to be handled, I investigated how adolescents and health professionals positioned themselves within discourses and social structures to construct meaning by creating narratives and explanatory models. A multi-sited ethnographic approach and a triangulation of participatory qualitative methods was applied, including participant observation, life mode interviewing, focus groups and collaborative visual methods. Paper 1 demonstrates how a young boy made sense of his experiences of illness and disruptions of social life and future aspiration through a combination of personal and cultural themes. Paper 2 presents a conceptual model of methodological and epistemological paradoxes in specialist health care settings. Paper 3 shows how communicative challenges in a rehabilitation center are interactionally handled by adolescent patients and health professionals, leading to the construction of two categories of patients. By looking at how meaning is ascribed, how categories intersect, and experience is accounted for in the various contexts of this study, I offer a nuanced and contextualized understanding of the possibilities, challenges and limits among the subjects involved. With this study, I hope to contribute to a more reflexive and patient-centered practice by bringing attention to the different value systems and knowledge regimes that underpins clinical reasoning.
... We shot short spurts of video of approximately a minute, mostly using a tripod, including both dog and handler within the frame. This was to conform to the requirements for the QBA but also it enabled us to frame the subjects in a manner that did not privilege either the dog or the human (MacDougall, 2005). As such, this produced a levelling gaze that decentred the human as the normatively central subject. ...
... SMITH ET AL. experienced via cognitive or sensory processes, and thus identified" (Smith, 2019, p. 138, citing Mitchell, 1997. In this case, the image is viewed as a "corporeal image" (MacDougall, 2005) inviting an intersensory-matching experience, which demonstrates one way how visual data can offer sensory information across species. ...
Article
To develop and illustrate the potential for visual methodologies in conducting multispecies ethnography, we present a case study of general‐purpose police dog training in the UK. Our argument is two‐fold: firstly, we draw on STS approaches and insights for looking at training activities as material and socio‐cultural devices that, we argue, constitute a training technology. Here we have been influenced by the work of Cussins and adopted her concept of ‘ontological choreographies’ for addressing the development of the police ‐dog police‐officer bond and ability to communicate for working together. Secondly, we argue that visual data capture presents valuable opportunities for ‘less human‐centred’ and more symmetrical methods to approach nonhuman/more than human research subjects. We illustrate how photo diaries and video clips enabled us to remain attentive to the material and embodied practices of dog training bringing to the fore the dogs’actions, tools and devices and thus enlivening the material‐cultural choreographies of the training activities. In conclusion, we elucidate how this onto‐epistemological approach enabled us to investigate the material and corporeal construction of the General Purpose (GP) police.
... In their efforts to defend ethnographic filmmaking as a mode of scholarship within a "discipline of words" (Mead, 2003), visual anthropologists have argued that film is an alternative venue for knowledge creation. These discussions have pointed towards the unique qualities of filmmaking as a way of knowing (MacDougall, 2006) and thus suggest that the two modalities of knowledge creation (text and film) are ontologically different. Recent conversations about the role of words within films problematize this distinction (van de Port, 2018); I extrapolate this discussion here to consider written articles and cinematographic outputs as interrelated rather than contrasting forms of research and publication. ...
... 452-454). This line of argumentation highlights the use of film as a mode of communication about "being", not only "meaning" (MacDougall, 2006). Observational Cinema, in particular, is associated with an open-ended style of continuity editing whereby the constructed character of the film is made almost invisible through the usage of long uninterrupted takes and almost seamless cuts, to offer the audience an experience of "being there" (Kiener, 2008, p. 407). ...
Chapter
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In his seminal work, Berger (1972) introduces ‘ways of seeing’ as the ways in which meaning is given to the things which are depicted that stand for something. Image-based ethnography has long been interested in these meaning construction processes, namely representations. The ethnographer, or the researcher – as part of the meaning-making process – produces and/or reproduces ways of representation, along with the research design and the outcome. Then the question arises: is a reflexive representation possible? The three chapters in the fourth section of this volume offer thoughts to provoke answers to this question and evoke a theoretical discussion on the dialectical relation between migration and the representation of it, through research. The concluding chapter of this section reflect on key methodological, ethical and theoretical issues connected to the ways of representation and the role of the researcher.
... In their efforts to defend ethnographic filmmaking as a mode of scholarship within a "discipline of words" (Mead, 2003), visual anthropologists have argued that film is an alternative venue for knowledge creation. These discussions have pointed towards the unique qualities of filmmaking as a way of knowing (MacDougall, 2006) and thus suggest that the two modalities of knowledge creation (text and film) are ontologically different. Recent conversations about the role of words within films problematize this distinction (van de Port, 2018); I extrapolate this discussion here to consider written articles and cinematographic outputs as interrelated rather than contrasting forms of research and publication. ...
... 452-454). This line of argumentation highlights the use of film as a mode of communication about "being", not only "meaning" (MacDougall, 2006). Observational Cinema, in particular, is associated with an open-ended style of continuity editing whereby the constructed character of the film is made almost invisible through the usage of long uninterrupted takes and almost seamless cuts, to offer the audience an experience of "being there" (Kiener, 2008, p. 407). ...
Chapter
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Film and text can be complementary modes of theory formation in the field of migration studies. If the theoretical potential of filmmaking is recognized in research, this also opens opportunities for teaching migration theory through film. This argument is illustrated here through the project Living like a common man , in which both film and text were used to observe, analyse, and theorize the migration experiences of young Indians to the UK - as ‘middling migration’. The resulting film offers a stand-alone argument that is used as teaching material in courses of migration studies; while accompanying texts make the argument explicit and clarify its significance for migration scholarship.
... An enskilled vision is a purposeful albeit often implicit way of scrutinising the world. A distinction is often made between looking and seeing (e.g., Okely 2001;MacDougall 2006), between unreflectively letting light waves imprint themselves on one's retina, mostly characterised as 'looking', and an attentive, purposeful, meaningful way of engaging and knowing characterised as 'seeing'. Enskillment, however, replaces this dualism with a gradual getting to see and know that clearly characterises all engagement with the world, including perceptive, and the many particular modes of vision that take place in particular settings and their particular interactions and activities. ...
Article
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Based on detailed descriptions of human–machine ensembles, this article explores how humans and machines work together to see specific things and unsee others, and how they come to co-configure one another. For seeing is not an automated function; whether one is a human or a machine, vision is gradually enskilled and mutually co-constituted. The analysis intersects three different ways of human–machine seeing to shed further light on the workings of each one: an airport, where facial recognition algorithms collaborate with border guards to grant passage to particular travellers and not to others; a luggage-scanning system, where potential security threats are assessed by a complex of X-rays and human intro-spection; and a hospital operating room, where human–machinic surgical robots find their way and operate on the insides of human bodies, touching only by seeing. In these examples, human and machine ways of seeing merge together, seeing in particular apparatuses of material, political, organisational, economic and fleshy components. The article analyses the practical work of human–machinic collaboration and explores how the different material and social constituents, not necessarily always working from the same agenda, come to configure what can be seen and sensed and what cannot. -> https://link.springer.com/epdf/10.1007/s00146-020-01064-1?sharing_token=20reyEStOoDBL75ROHP4yve4RwlQNchNByi7wbcMAY4oGOe0JB2PWiBep9qJ_HkWJ0t9EjZTYZZXB8aBDa0EdMw-lJOhHh18Byk1Ot8wAgEH7t5_moZoeChtbDZamvi6pNPG_wzoi3nDZrREvkqvoNwTTqANfYEBjpXPbWEjJFE%3D&fbclid=IwAR18ETo1S3aXuYABZzGNRNHN2YLytRNFfVmk5TDQUlFbbIP8Qgp3dyBmuqE
... En el ámbito de la antropología visual, distintos autores (MacDougall, 2006;Pink, 2009;Pink et al., 2010;Rouch, [1975] (1995); Ruby, 1992;Min-Ha, 1989) han discutido cómo el trabajo con imágenes propicia situaciones de encuentro. ...
Article
This article discusses the use of images in socio-anthropological research and their contribution to the development of performance-research methodological strategies. By bringing three research-creation collaborative experiences developed in different violent and/or traumatic socio-political contexts in Argentina (a video workshop conducted with indigenous toba-qom teachers, a video-dance in the ruins of Villa Epecuén and a performatic installation about the feminist movement NiUnaMenos) it reflects on different relationships between performance-camera-corporalities and explores the poetic-epistemological-political potential of the images to (re)present sensitive corporalities. In dialogue with other embodied research methods, the analysis suggests how the use of images in a cross-disciplinary approach can contribute to the development of participatory-collaborative strategies and enable a space for decolonizing our gaze(s) and micropolitical transformation.
... The visual may comprise both still and moving images, including videography as videography is a way of representing phenomena situating it within its social, cultural and temporal contexts (Cubbitt, 1991). MacDougall (2005) proposed that user generated video reflected the thoughts of the creators and were thus of interest in consumer studies. Indeed, Belk et al. (2018) posit that videography moves beyond a data capture tool with representational value as it encourages immersion and facilitates theorising. ...
Article
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This methodological paper investigates how visual methods contribute to the understanding of consumers' values. The study adopts a digital ethnography approach in which participant generated photographs and videos unearth complex and intangible consumer values associated with food consumption. The findings indicate that visual methods are powerful in moving beyond the representational and offer a transformative capability for participants in making abstract constructs more concrete. The research illustrates that embedded visual methods are compelling in giving “voice” to participants and as such they are more engaged with the research process. In addition, the study suggests that visual methods provide valuable and more complete insights into consumer research when text, sound, and image interplay.
... This shift is explained with reference to VRE's ultimate goal: to engage participants (and not just researchers) in learning about the circumstances, spaces, relations and practices in which they are embroiled. VRE's main inspirations include Rouch's (2003) and MacDougall's (2006) participatory approaches to video-making, Wittgenstein's (1953) meaningmaking games, post-cognitivist developments in social psychology (Still and Costall 1991) including Shotter's (1993) account of 'conversational realities', and Engeström's Vygotskyan theory and video-enabled methodology underpinning 'expansive learning' (Engeström 2008). ...
Chapter
This chapter explores how video-reflexivity is used to study the ways in which sensory information is redistributed by the use of telemedicine technologies. As mentioned by Maslen (2017), making visible the sensory work in context of telemedicine is a methodological challenge. The chapter addresses this challenge with a methodological approach based on the two-sides of video-ethnography. In the empirical study presented, we used a methodological apparatus based on the video recordings of situated clinical activities in telemedicine (video-ethnography called the “bright side”) and video self-confrontation with physicians (called the “hidden side”). This methodological approach aims to produce an interpretative framework of clinical practice in telemedicine by the doctors themselves to make visible various forms of “sensing-at-distance.” https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-65551-8_4
... what i propose here, in the context of a discussion of research ethics, perhaps especially in indigenous contexts, is that, in order to listen in to musicking as a world-making by more-than-human assemblages, we first need to reduce the abundance of noise symptomatic of the processes of colonial silencing 'through denial, negation, and abuse' (ochoa gautier, 2015, p. 187). harmonising with george (2017), who stresses that 'we must have some difficult conversationsor at least converse!' about this noisy silence between anthropology and Māori, MacDougall (2006) suggests that 'honesty in looking' (or in this case, listening) can only happen if we are prepared 'to be fully attentive [to our fear of what silence may contain]' and to 'risk giving up something of ourselves' (p. 8). to begin to 'stir up this silence' (george, 2017), perhaps one needs to be listening in to what is really at stake for all involved and not simply listening blindly, thereby evading our responsibility to others and to ourselves. ...
Chapter
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This chapter looks at what it means to set out to do anthropological research with tangata whenua (New Zealanders of Māori descent; literally, ‘people of the land’), from the particular perspective of a Pākehā (New Zealander of non-Māori descent – usually European) musical anthropologist with an interest in sound-made worlds. In late 2017, Lowe was awarded funding for a conjoint PhD scholarship in anthropology at James Cook University, Australia, and Aarhus University, Denmark. However, following advice from several colleagues in Aotearoa New Zealand, Lowe decided to assess the viability of the project with his prospective Māori and non-Māori collaborators prior to officially starting his PhD candidature. Throughout this process of pre-ethics (Barrett, 2016), Lowe met with both Māori and non-Māori to discuss the proposed PhD project; a ‘listening in’ to his own socio-historical positioning as a Pākehā anthropologist within contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand. This approach to anthropological research is in response to George (2017), who argues for a new politically and ethnically aware mode of anthropology that aims to (re)establish relationships of true meaning between anthropology and Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand.
... Conversations in both visual and sensory anthropology that attend to this 'third meaning' remind us that knowledge beyond the linguistic demands a different means of approach (Edwards, 2011;Kalantzis, 2015;MacDougall, 2006;Morphy and Banks, 1997;Pink, 2005;Banks (2001) ;Pinney, 2005;Varvantakis, 2016Varvantakis, , 2021. Affect plays a key role in giving linguistic form to the 'third meaning' , it requires, as Tina Campt (2017: 3) persuasively argues, a broad repertoire of 'modalities of perception, encounter and engagement' , including the beautifully counterintuitive idea of 'listening' to images (Campt, 2017). ...
Article
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Abstract: Drawing on ethnographic research with children in Athens, the authors examine sensual, performative and embodied aspects of children’s photo- graphic representations of a monument that is central in the Greek national, cultural and historical discourse, the Acropolis. Moving away from the hermeneutics of cultural domination, the focus of this article is on how the pictures depicted the monument and how they were used by the children. Assuming an analytical framework which incorporates aspects of sensual experience in the analysis of the photography, the authors discuss how the children’s pictures of the Acropolis not only make visual records of the monument, and thus are not simply visual evidence of the centrality of the mainstream Greek national and historical discourse, but also how they entail the children’s embodied relation to it, and what this relation might tell us about childhood expressions of heritage and belonging, and by extension about politics in childhood. The analytical focus on embodied aspects of children’s photography illuminates complexities of cultural representation and their gestural, discursive and political significance. Keywords: children • cultural politics • Greece • heritage • multimodal ethnography • photography • public space • the senses
... In editing the recorded footage and composing this multimodal article, we drew on literature from the field of visual anthropology (Banks, 2007;MacDougall, 1998MacDougall, , 2005 as well as STS (M'charek, 2014). In the tradition of experimental film, montage can evoke hidden dimensions of ethnographic reality (Suhr and Willerslev, 2013). ...
Article
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This methodographic paper explores the performativity and materiality of methods in STS research practice. Studying the absent presence of race in facial composite drawing in the Netherlands, the confidential nature of criminal investigations put constraints on our possibilities to study this practice. To generate data to work with, we created an ethnographic experiment producing two facial composites in collaboration with two forensic artists. We recorded the drawing process using a variety of (audiovisual) technologies to produce different materializations of the event. Tinkering with and analyzing the generated materials sensitized the ethnographers to three different modes of doing difference in which race surfaces in the process of facial composite drawing: 1) touching as describing; 2) layering and surfacing; and 3) articulating the common. We argue that different modes of doing ethnography, for instance, conducting research with audiovisual and experimental methods, can open up new ground to approach difficult and slippery objects such as race.
... 2 During fieldwork conducted between 2017 and 2018, we adapted a "sensuous" (Pink, 2009), "mobile" (Büscher et al., 2011), and "embodied" (Wellard, 2015) approach to ethnography by practicing our respective martial arts. The "carnal" (Wacquant, 2015) understanding we gained through this approach was contextualised and deepened through visual (MacDougall and Castaing-Taylor, 1998;MacDougall, 2006) and classic ethnographic methods including interviewing and participant observation. The presented data has been accrued during our fieldwork and ongoing conversations with our interlocutors. ...
... Concretamente se trata del diseño de una acción docente que incorpora en el aula virtual un recurso didáctico. Este consiste en un video de animación interactivo para acompañar al alumnado en su primera incursión a la etnografía, en el marco del grado en del curso es asentar los fundamentos de la investigación etnográfica, trabajando la etnografía como perspectiva epistemológica y como encuentro cultural (MacDougall, 2006) durante el trabajo de campo. Por ello, la metodología del curso está orientada hacia la reflexión práctica, de modo que el estudiantado realice una pequeña experiencia de campo guiada, a la vez que trabaja con la lectura de artículos y de monografías etnográficas clásicas y contemporáneas, además de otros recursos pedagógicos como películas o documentales. ...
Chapter
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En este capítulo presentamos una experiencia de innovación en estrategias pedagógicas y formas de aprendizaje para la enseñanza online de la antropología. Concretamente se trata del diseño de una acción docente que incorpora en el aula virtual un recurso didáctico. Este consiste en un video de animación interactivo para acompañar al alumnado en su primera incursión a la etnografía.
... A notable difference, however, is the express engagement of social semiotics with the new media, which brings it in close dialogue with the recent work inspired by the media ecology tradition (see e.g. Bull 2007, MacDougall 2005, Shinkle 2008). ...
... la liberté de découvrir une lutte, devenue par la magie d'une approche sensible qui met le spectateur en relation directe avec ce qui est filmé, quasi intemporelle. Comme cette démarche se situe au coeur de réflexions sur le renouvellement des formes d'écriture anthropologique (Laplantine, 2005(Laplantine, , 2021MacDougall, 2005 ;Pink, 2006Pink, , 2009, Sangharsh, le temps de la lutte mérite d'être considéré comme un cas d'étude éminemment contemporain pour nourrir une foisonnante littérature d'anthropologie visuelle en dialogue avec les arts. Si mon entretien avec Jaoul a été conduit dans cette direction, j'ai également voulu rester au plus proche de sa démarche de réalisateur qui révèle, en premier lieu, comment sa relation aux images et aux sons a accompagné et transformé son travail anthropologique du politique. ...
... The new learning dimension experiences through the reflective processes accompanying the recording of videos and through supervision seemed to be an important motivating factor to the healthcare providers because of the potential for personal and team-based improvements. Video-based feedback has been recognised to assist healthcare providers in tapping into the visual and auditory patient cues present in a consultation that are not available through text-based learning (Kamin et al., 1999), where showing becomes a way of saying the unsayable (MacDougall, 2006). In line with other studies, the videos made the healthcare providers aware of taken-for-granted acts and 'tacit knowledge', which have been argued to be fundamental resources of knowledge in improving practice (Rolfe, 1998;Cheater, 2003;Meyer, 2003;Iedema et al., 2009b). ...
Article
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Aim To understand healthcare providers’ experiences with video recording of patient consultations. Background Video recordings have been recognised to be an effective method to evaluate in situ interactions in clinical practice. The video recordings are often conducted by researchers, but active involvement of healthcare providers into the process of recording is evolving. Still, little is known of how video recordings by healthcare providers may influence daily clinical practice and potentials for direct use to guide practice development. Methods A qualitative design was used, conducting two focus group interviews including 12 healthcare providers representing eight different healthcare services who provide municipal cardiac rehabilitation. Interpretive description was used as the methodological framework, and symbolic interactionism served as the theoretical lens. Findings Three themes were identified reflecting healthcare providers’ experiences with video recording of patient consultations: ‘Concerns of compromising primary work tasks’, ‘Exposing professional and personal skills’ and ‘A new learning dimension’. Overall, the three themes represent the process of video recording own practices attached to patient consultations and the personal investment attached to the video data. Also, how the recordings may provide new insights for practice development in terms of individual and team-based performance in patient consultations. Conclusion Video recordings by healthcaref providers may be a useful source to provide information and learning about patient consultation practice to use in research and supervision, keeping in mind their challenges of implementation into daily clinical practice.
... All participants were current or previous clients of school nurses, mental health services and/or social workers, and some had previously been diagnosed with anxiety, PTSD or depression. We applied visual methods (Youth Gaze methodology) to explore otherwise hard to reach aspects of their experience (Pink 2007, MacDougall 2006, Waage 2016, and to engage in ongoing analytical and reflective dialogue with the participants (Waage 2013). We also conducted nineteen in-depth interviews with thirteen of the participants. ...
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Little is known about the perspectives of young people suffering from medically unexplained symptoms. This study aims to explore the experiences and strategies of young Norwegians related to incipient and persistent health complaints affecting everyday life functioning. The study draws on field notes, video material and interview transcripts from a multi-sited ethnographic study of healthcare services and select schools in a small Norwegian town between 2015 and 2016. A central theme is the emphasis upon social and existential constraints seemingly framed by a social imaginary of youth rather than a medical imaginary, and their active engagements to ‘fix’ their lives through what we identify as two main modalities of self-care. Navigating temporal and relational aspects of sociocultural configurations of youth in their social environments, they imagine and enact alternative qualifying positions better adapted to constraints, personal preferences and needs. Our findings may add to understandings of the needs and strategies of young sufferers of medically unexplained symptoms, relevant for health and social care encounters.
Article
This essay argues that the cinematic experience for audiences be reconsidered as a cinesomatic experience. Theorists such as Vivian Sobchack (1992; 2000; 2005) and Jennifer Barker (2009) have done much to conceptualise and theorise a sensory, embodied experience of cinema. These scholars, mainly drawing from either a Merleau-Pontian phenomenology or a Spinozist/Deleuzian theory of affect, have led the wave of new writings probing the ways in which audience engagement with film is corporeal. Their work explores cinema in terms of visual and haptic engagements, congruous with a broader move in scholarship towards the sensorial. However, despite the growth of embodied film theory in recent years, there is an even greater need to take the sensorial model of cinema spectatorship to film sound. This essay addresses cinema sound in specifically corporeal terms, demonstrating how audience experiences of film sound can be reconsidered as cinesomatic. By drawing a textual and phenomenological reading of the sound design in Gravity (Alfonso Cuarón, 2013), this essay aims to reveal new insights into the materially rich experience of a film’s soundtrack and demonstrate how a multiplicity of ‘narratives’ converge during and beyond the cinema encounter.
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Tomaremos la obra O Peixe de Jonathas de Andrade (2016) para observar cómo actúa un simulacro de documental etnográfico que falsea el rescate de un ritual ancestral de interés antropológico. De Andrade desnaturaliza soportes con los que se ha construido la alteridad y el relato histórico y pone en presencia cómo ‘Latinoamérica’ patrocinó la museificación identitaria de ‘indígenas’ y ‘negros’ para domesticarlos como parte del proyecto de Estado-nación, ‘diferencias’ que más tarde en Brasil se pretendieron (también) despolitizar bajo la fórmula de la ‘democracia racial’ y el ‘multiculturalismo.’ Interpela al espectador apropiándose y movilizando categorías esencialistas ancladas en la ‘cultura’/’raza’/‘etnia’ que habitúan ser usadas para clasificar a parte de la población pretendidamente ‘no occidental’ -aún dentro del territorio nacional- bajo fines subalternizantes. O Peixe ofrece un camino de conocimiento experiencial y promueve etnografiar su visualización. Los pescadores, al encarnar -en un performance paródico- un mito arquetípico con el que se los sueña, trastocan su objetualización para devolver una mirada que no se deja subyugar, que retoma linajes cortados y gesta historias alternativas mostrando un ser que desde tiempos de la colonia fue ‘moderno de otra manera,’ globalizado y, desde siempre, híbrido, ‘caníbal,’ ‘impuro.’
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This paper introduces the idea of learning phenomena based on Barad’s onto-epistemology and her understanding of reality as an entanglement of phenomena. To do so, it is presented one of the different learning phenomena occurred during a research with 10- to 11-year-old students about possibilities, engagements, and movements of visual documentation and learning in primary classrooms. During a part of the research, I was visually documenting how children were visually documenting their learning processes. The learning phenomenon presented here occurred during this part of the research. What follows is an unfolding of this learning phenomenon in different dimensions through dialoguing with Deleuze and Guattari’s concepts and new materialism theories. In this way, the paper moves towards concepts like intra-active pedagogy, researching and learning in the making, embodied learning and in which way agencies of observation matter in educational practices.
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Mit der Aufnahme vieler Geflüchteter im Jahr 2015 ergeben sich in Deutschland neue gesellschaftliche Fragestellungen, die auch religionsbezogene Aspekte beinhalten. Flüchtlingsunterkünfte als besondere Räume des Zusammenlebens eignen sich hierbei sehr gut, um nachzuvollziehen, wer jene Geflüchtete sind, inwiefern ihr Alltag von Religion geprägt ist und wie unter den Bewohner*innen und von Seiten der Sozialarbeiter*innen mit Phänomenen um Religion umgegangen wird. Natalie Powroznik nimmt sich diesen Aspekten im nordrhein-westfälischen Kontext an und zeigt aus sozialanthropologischer Perspektive, wie vielfältig und unterschiedlich Religion in Erscheinung treten kann - und warum der erste Blick manchmal täuscht.
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Resumo: O documentário expandido Cine Rabeca é realizado com trilha sonora ao vivo feita pelos músicos Luiz Paixão e Renata Rosa, que há 20 anos circulam internacionalmente apresentando as poéticas musicais da Zona da Mata de Pernambuco. Na performance, em primeiro plano, os músicos estão no centro do palco, sentados lado a lado em um único banco. Por trás deles, projeta-se um documentário sobre suas trajetórias, feito a partir de acervo fílmico produzido entre 1991 e 2009. Este movimento do duplo filme-performers cria uma imagem que fornece insights situados no encontro entre a pesquisa de campo e a experimentação artística. Este trabalho propõe uma abordagem analítica do processo de criação do documentário para pensar sobre como a imagem atua na percepção de vestígios do tempo e na evocação de memórias. Palavras-chave: Documentário etnográfico. Imagem. Cine-transe TIME AND MEMORY ON THE SCENE: THOUGHTS ON THE CREATION PROCESS OF THE EXPANDED DOCUMENTARY CINE RABECA Abstract: The expanded documentary Cine Rabeca is staged with live soundtrack by the musicians Luiz Paixão and Renata Rosa, that have been touring internationally over the last twenty years presenting the poetics from the Zona da Mata Norte region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. In the performance, the musicians are in the center of the stage, sitting side by side on a single bench. A documentary about their life trajectory, made through film archive from years 1991-2009 is screened behind them. This movement of the double film-performers creates an image that offers insights concerning field research and artistic experience. This paper offers an analytic approach of the documentary creation process and discusses how image acts in the perception of traces of time and evocation of memory. Keywords: Ethnographic documentary. Image. Cine-trance
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This chapter discusses how being moved may engender ecstasis, or ‘standing outside’. It reviews the evolutionary anthropotechnics that made possible such ecstasis. The chapter then asks the question: if becoming is inscribed into life, and if this renders becoming undone likely if not inevitable (before or as death), how are we to understand the connection between becoming and learning? In answering this question, the chapter explores learning and showback as means to engendering deliberations through which people may come to simulate and experience ecstasis.
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社会学論叢,日本大学社会学会編, 198号
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Resumo Este artigo tem por objetivo uma etnografia de um vídeo que viralizou e se tornou histórico, o Passinho foda, postado em 2008 por um rapaz de 16 anos, numa lan house do subúrbio carioca localizada no bairro de Pilares. Partindo do conceito de ‘arte como mediação’ de A. Hennion, de ‘arte como agência’ de A. Gell e de uma ‘antropologia no som’ de S. Feld, propomos analisar o caráter inventivo da performance digital do passinho, que inclui criação, produção, dança, postagem, som e imagem. Palavras-chave: dança urbana, som, imagem, internet, performance, criatividade
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Varvantakis, C (2021) Η Ακρόπολη από μακριά: Απόσταση, εγγύτητα και αφή (Acropolis from a distance: Distance, proximity and touch) In: Petsini, P, Stathatos, Y (eds) Φωτογραφία και συλλογικές ταυτότητες: Ελληνικές φωτογραφικές μελέτες Ι (Photography and collective identities: Greek photographic studies I). Athens: Koukkida, 159–178.
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In the current scenario, digital tools such as virtual reality environments have the potential to support learning. According to educationists, the use of digital tools in curriculum makes practical understanding and incubate operational abilities among students. But digitalization of curriculum, especially for learning art and design arises a couple of significant questions; how and what types of interactivity and playful engagements required for tech-savvy experiential learning. How the learning outcome could be evaluated in specific art and design lesson. This study aims to develop a virtual reality-based activity that involves the student developing an innovative idea by assembling and creating new images such as pattern or art forms or utility objects in the context of the Indian school. Besides, an evaluation format is developed with the reference of revised Bloom's Taxonomy. The idea of VR environment developing method carried out three aspects of virtual environment making strategies; Spatiality- the use of space, virtuality- a feeling of being there and representation- the choice of present the things. By using a handheld controller participant hunt the assets and change their forms and placed them in position. The study follows the practice-based methodology and qualitative analysis to define reflectivity and addresses the trustworthiness criteria. This study also includes the process of developing a VR environment and analyzing practitioner’s experience to understand the ease and difficulties in terms of making, applicability, and usability. Keywords: Art and design, virtual reality, experiential learning, evaluation tool
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This dissertation examines the representation of World War II in First Person Shooters (FPSs) and the shift in their perception after the release of Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan (1998). It argues that the release of Saving Private Ryan (1998) allowed the genre to unhinge itself from a popular discourse critical of immersive video games and attach itself to a discourse that regarded embodiment as a privileged way of representing history realistically. The first chapter analyzes the PC game Wolfenstein 3D (1992) to establish the genre’s state of play before the release of Spielberg’s film. It lays out the limitations faced by the game genre: due to the perception that FPSs engage the players’ bodies more directly than other media, they found themselves unable to function as fact-based historiographies. As a result, they approached representations of WWII by combining them with the genre inventories of science fiction and horror. Chapter II introduces the term “visceral realism” to analyze the impact of Steven Spielberg’s 1998 war film Saving Private Ryan on representations of WWII and their perception. It argues that the highly physical opening battle scene in particular shifted the perception of such representations from associations with horror and the ‘body genre’ to the idea that bodily experienced WWII historiographies offer a privileged access to the hardships and struggles of the ‘Greatest Generation.’ Chapter III analyzes the first FPS to react to this shift, Medal of Honor (1999), and argues that it unhinged the genre from public controversies in the wake of the Columbine High School Massacre by alluding to accepted genres like the spy thriller and ideologies like the celebration of the ‘Greatest Generation.’ Chapter IV discusses the 2003 FPS Call of Duty and its use of cinematic conventions and portrayal of historical artifacts to establish a U.S.-centric narrative of war from the perspectives of the U.S., U.K. and USSR troops. I argue that this shift in national subjectivities during the game serves as an extension of Cold War ideology by constructing a moral hierarchy between the United States, Great Britain and Communist Russia. Finally, the conclusion considers the historical and cultural environment of this dissertation’s analyses and, using postwar Germany as an example, shows the wide variety of possible readings of these games.
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Categories into which people classify themselves and others in a North Indian city were collected, together with identifying characteristics and stereotypes. Utilizing a symbolic interactionist perspective, these were analyzed with reference to social behavior: the manner in which interaction was conditioned or influenced by the system of social categories and the meanings attached to them. The complexity of the terminological system, its variability and manipulability, the crucial importance of situation and audience, and the tenuous relationship between terminology and behavior were revealed.