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Depression information on the Internet for Asian Americans

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Abstract

The anonymity of the Internet may provide depression information to Asian Americans who often associate depression with shame and stigma beliefs and avoid treatment. We interviewed 20 Asian Americans regarding reasons for Internet depression information use, non-use, and relevant Web site topics. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative responses. Reasons for Internet use included difficulty talking face-to-face, confidential, useful information, and convenience. Reasons for non-Internet use included "not a good source" and denial concerning depression. The Internet can allow for depression information tailored to Asian Americans and this study suggests topics of interest to include on such a Web site.

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... Three studies showed how users of ICTs liked the option of being able to choose where to use technology (ie, at work or in the convenience of their own homes) [35][36][37]. Having easy access to information from around the world, at any time in the day, through use of the Internet was regarded as useful in comparison to using books [37,38]. ...
... The use of websites to support relatives of people with depression appeared to decrease feelings of stigma in both by enabling people to draw strength from talking more openly about their situation [37]. Young people were concerned about feelings of embarrassment if other people realized they had depression increasing a sense of helplessness [38][39][40]. Fear of being judged by others due to having a mental health issue was a particular problem faced by some young users of ICTs and it became a specific reason for using the technology [39,41]. Fear of school peers finding out and potential links to bullying opted users to engage with ICTs in the privacy of their own homes [41]. ...
... ICTs appeared to provide people with options regarding how they used technology with choice over temporal, location, treatment, privacy, and disclosure aspects of their care needs [33,38,39,41,45]. The credibility of ICTs appeared an important factor when deciding upon usage [35]. ...
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... Many studies have noted differences between men and women in terms of privacy issues, especially when technology is involved. In general, women tend to perceive more risk online and report more privacy concerns than men (Fogel and Nehmad 2009). Men were also more likely to be receptive to potentially invasive technologies than women (Milne and Bahl 2010). ...
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