ArticlePDF Available

We are not rich enough to buy cheap things: Clothing consumption of the St. Petersburg middle class

Authors:
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
... Это, скорее, означает, что девиз «Иметь -значит быть» не приписывается информантами финской культуре и не рассматривается ими как черта, присущая потреблению финского среднего класса. В свою очередь, российский средний класс также рачителен [Gurova 2012], однако современный российский материализм предполагает демонстрацию финансового благосостояния и внимание к брендам: ...
Article
An ethnographic approach to consumption practices of upper-class young-adult women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, shows how shopping and selling experiences are seen as opportunities for owners, staff, and customers to build social relations. As a consequence, the belt of trust that is built through such transactions creates a network of stores, women, brands, and goods attached by strong reciprocity ties. This also produces a distinction between shops that are “cozy,” and the ones that are bureaucratic and “open to everyone.” Among such practices, informants reproduce the particular Brazilian rite of asking “Do you know who you are talking to?” to reinforce local social hierarchies and distinctions, a rite that was previously analyzed by the anthropologist Roberto DaMatta. While consumption practices are often seen as some sort of North Americanization of the world, we argue for the importance of ethnographic accounts that map local forms of appropriation and particular power dynamics.
Article
Full-text available
This article analyses 178 essays written in April 1997, in which Siberian students (15-22-year-olds) described their understandings of Soviet and post-Soviet realities. The main change between the two regimes is perceived in these essays as the change in patterns of consumption. Moreover, as the essays indicate, the new Russian style of consumption, usually associated with the style of the new rich classes in Russia, finds its fullest representation in the figure of the `new Russian' man. The article suggests that students' attempts to envision unfamiliar patterns of wealthy consumption bring with them the reproduction of their own cultural dispositions and habits. Being unable to easily come up with adequate cultural signifiers that could homologically represent the distinctive economic location of the new rich, students chose to follow the path of quantitative rather than qualitative representation, expressing `the taste of luxury' in terms of the `taste of necessity'. Along with this subjective factor, that is, the students' own cultural dispositions, the prominence of the quantitative factor in their descriptions of the new Russian style of consumption is determined by the absence of a developed field of post-Soviet cultural production, which could have provided the new Russian style with distinctive status symbols.
Article
The disintegration of Soviet social contracts has provoked, for many Russians, a continuing deliberation over the tense interrelation between material embodiments of value (wealth and commodities) and moral ones (respectability, education, and kindness). By contrast with previous anthropological tendencies to locate value production primarily within exchange transactions, in this article I identify two historically specific tropes of value (“culturedness” and “civilization”) and show how their articulation illuminates positioned experiences of large-scale change and social displacement. From the particular vantage point of St. Petersburg schoolteachers, I consider everyday deliberations about value and social difference as they take form within both local and global frames of reference, examining how these two contexts frequently produce divergent—but only seemingly contradictory—visions of marketization, its desirability, and its sociomoral significance.