Article

Carisoprodol: An effective abortive agent in migraine without aura

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Abstract

Background: The early use of medications will often abort migraine headaches, but there is a limited availability of such medications. Objective: The efficacy of naproxen, a known effective drug in migraine, was compared to that of carisoprodol, a skeletal muscle relaxant, to see if the latter agent might be added to the drugs available for early migraine treatment. Design: Retrospective chart review of the treatment of 100 patients with migraine without aura, in a clinical headache practice. Results: Naproxen and carisoprodol both appeared to be very effective in the early treatment of migraine without aura. Naproxen was not superior to carisoprodol in any aspect. Conclusion: Carisoprodol appears to be very effective in the early treatment of migraine without aura. Further controlled, randomized, double-blinded studies are indicated to further evaluate carisoprodol's efficacy and safety in migraine treatment. Because of the apparent potential for abuse and/or habituation, cautious use of carisoprodol is recommended at this time.

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Carisoprodol (Soma) is a noncontrolled, skeletal-muscle relaxant whose active metabolite is meprobamate. Despite previous indications that the drug may be abused, it continues to be widely prescribed for musculoskeletal conditions involving muscle spasm. Presented here are three cases demonstrating patterns of carisoprodol abuse not previously reported. Carisoprodol usage should be limited to short-term treatment. Patients for whom carisoprodol is prescribed are at risk for meprobamate dependence.
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Article
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