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Abstract

Now, for the first time, a philosopher undertakes a systematic investigation of the moral and aesthetic issues to which cultural appropriation gives rise. Cultural appropriation is a pervasive feature of the contemporary world (the Parthenon Marbles remain in London; white musicians from Bix Beiderbeck to Eric Clapton have appropriated musical styles from African-American culture). Young offers the first systematic philosophical investigation of the moral and aesthetic issues to which cultural appropriation gives rise. Tackles head on the thorny issues arising from the clash and integration of cultures and their artifacts. Questions considered include: "Can cultural appropriation result in the production of aesthetically successful works of art?" and "Is cultural appropriation in the arts morally objectionable?". Part of the highly regarded New Directions in Aesthetics series.
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... Comenzó a utilizarse el genérico parkour & freerunning, mientras la presencia de acrobacias aumentaba en algunos segmentos de la comunidad. En este sentido, Young (2007) plantea que, aunque una cultura puede tener fronteras difusas y es posible un solapamiento entre culturas o subculturas, hay algunos rasgos fundamentales que diferencian a los miembros de una cultura: conocimientos, ética, arte y costumbres compartidas. ...
... Buscando comprender por qué una parte de la cultura del parkour siente que está siendo invadida y sufriendo apropiación, se despliega a continuación un análisis basado en una línea específica, con categorías delineadas por Young (2007): apropiación cultural, apropiación cultural ofensiva, apropiación cultural dañina y asimilación. La intención es interpretar el punto de vista de las y los practicantes de parkour, con apoyo en categorías de análisis teórico. ...
... Pero ¿cómo valorar quién tiene autoridad para incidir en el desarrollo de una cultura, y más aún en una disciplina sin gobierno ni conducción centralizada como ha sido el parkour? Para pensar este tema difuso y complejo, nos alineamos con la propuesta de Young (2007), que lo analiza estrictamente en términos de ética. ...
... The numerous responses received from various people from around the globe show how cultural appreciation and cultural appropriation are two distinct things that can not integrate. According to Young (2008), chefs should pay respect to the original recipe when making cultural accusations by researching how to cook the cuisine properly and considering which one needs a replacement. Showing legitimate information about the original recipe against the professional chefs that cook Asian cuisine inaccurately is evolving into an intense topic in the cultural issue. ...
... Misrecognition of culture happens when the appropriator tries to acquire a cultural element different from theirs but ends with a huge difference, the original member of the targeted culture is responsible for cleaning up the mess. These responsibilities are because of those five western chefs' ignorance of their lack of research and failure to give justification for their changes (Young, 2008;Green & Kaiser, 2017;Han, 2019;Lenard & Balint, 2019). Uncle Roger got confused when responding to the chefs because they were proud and confident to spread false information about the Asian dish. ...
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The globalization era eliminates borders between cultures, making people mistakenly know cultural appropriation with cultural appreciation when recreating or adopting specific cultures outside their own. Examples of cultural appropriation are seen in Uncle Roger's reactional videos of the five western chefs recreating Asian dishes inaccurately. This study intends to improve the awareness of cultural appropriation by communicating cultural appropriation characteristics through videos and unveiling the harmful effects of cultural appropriation on the targeted culture. This study uses multimodal analysis to discover the inaccurate elements in the cooking videos and audience reception analysis to show audience response to cultural appropriation and its harmful effect based on James O. Young's cultural appropriation theory. The findings highlight three main elements that are presented inaccurately in the videos: (1) the kitchen utensils, (2) ingredients and seasonings, and (3) the cooking method. Spotlighting the inappropriate representation of Asian food by the five western chefs attracts massive protests toward them led by Uncle Roger. There are numerous responses from netizens who agree with Uncle Roger about the inaccurate food adaptation and find the harmful effect of cultural appropriation that gives misrecognition and bad stereotypes of Asian cuisine. Based on the previous response, the cooking videos by five western chefs are also classified as cultural exploitation because they received massive engagement and did not plan to revise their recipes.
... When dominant cultures take from another culture without thorough research and omit cultural context, they actively commit CA (Han 2019). A method involved in acts of cultural appropriation is depicting a source culture through an external lens, experience, or social and cultural interpretation (Young 2010). Not involving the interpretation of the source culture results in consequences like risking stereotype portrayal, exploitation, and oppression of the referenced culture (D'Silva, O'Gara, and Villaluz 2018;Matthes 2019). ...
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The purpose of the study was to explore instances of cultural appropriation by fashion designers and brands (FD&B), identify cultural sources of inspiration, and, through a justice-centered lens, critique how practices of appropriation manifest as violence. A latent content analysis approach was utilized to focus on the underlying meanings of cultural appropriation in the fashion design practices of fashion designers and brands. Cultural appropriation practices manifested through three theme categories: a) the white lens, b) the capitalist motive, and c) negligence in the research process. Analysis showed that practices extend beyond Kristian Hogans is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Textiles, Merchandising, and Interiors at the University of Georgia. Her research interest is exploring praxis in the global apparel supply chain, connecting education and industry through historical, socio-cultural, and justice-oriented frameworks. She utilizes both quantitative and qualitative research methods. kristian.hogans@uga.edu. the traditional definition of cultural appropriation, the apparel design process has connections to violent practices that manifest in cultural appropriation, and positionality plays a role in the apparel design process and research. Future areas of research are suggested concerning cultural appropriation research, the apparel design process, and apparel design education.
... Societal values, political regimes, and cultural changes -along with their internal dynamicsinfluence those aspects and elements of an organization's direct and indirect history, which the organization and its stakeholders perceive as relevant and legitimate (Lueg et al., 2021b). Conflicts related to which stories could and should be told arise for instance when stakeholders experience that certain organizations overlook or take advantage of the cultural identity and belonging of the stakeholders, i.e. practice cultural appropriation (Young, 2010). To name one example, Disney has been subject to manifold discussions of inaccurate and damaging storytelling. ...
... During the process of cross-cultural exchange, architectural ideas might be appropriated, synthesized and transformed into new forms of narrative in a new cultural context. In cultural studies, appropriation is often seen as bound up with the oppression of minority cultures and usually adopts a posture of critique and even assault; therefore it was in many respects controversial (Young, 2008). However, in transcultural architecture practice, how to express regional identity is an important issue considered by many architects and clients, and formal "appropriation" is a very common tactics and usually an effective countermeasure. ...
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Drawing upon the concept of “appropriation”, this chapter seeks to understand the processes by which Chinese architectural professionals incorporated and synthesized various aesthetic and intellectual sources in the transnational practice of China’s architectural exports to the Global South. By focusing on China’s engagement with Sri Lanka and on the work of the Bandaranaike Memorial International Conference Hall (BMICH) and later Nelum Pokuna Theater in Colombo and on the manifestation of appropriation in contemporary transcultural practice, this chapter traces the interactions between an intention to respond to local tropical climatic condition and an approach to appropriate Chinese, Sri Lankan, and international architectural culture. It argues that the appropriation, synthesis and transformation of architectural ideas from various contexts created new forms of identity which articulated political and cultural manifestations. Formally and technically, the Chinese architects’ attempt to adopt an appropriate aesthetics of tropics away from a domestic kind of socialist realism was premised upon an effort to create building able to reflect Sri Lanka’s environmental and cultural identity. The juxtaposition of appropriating Sri Lankan architecture in both Colombo and in China suggests that the dual mobility of architectural ideas helped contribute to forming new political and cultural identities urgently needed both by the Bandaranaike administration and by a group of emerging Chinese architects.
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