Article

Result of long-term methylcobalamin treatment for male infertility

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  • Mie sleep clinic
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Abstract

The subjects were 107 patients with idiopathic oligozoospermia or normozoospermia, who were treated with Methylcobalamin 1,500 μg/day for more than 3 months at the Infertility Clinic of Department of Urology, Yokohama City University and able to be evaluated retrospectively as to the change of seminal findings, pregnancy rate and periods of drug administration. Semen analyses were examined three times by Cell-soft semenanalyzer or C-MEN Ver. 1.02 before the treatment. They were expediently categorized according to the sperm density into near-azoospermia (less than 5.0 × 106/ml), severe oligozoospermia (5.0 × 106/ml-less than 10.0 × 10 6/ml), oligozoospermia (10.0 × 106/ml-less than 20. 0 × 106/ ml), normozoospermia with lower sperm density (20.0 × 106/ml-less than 40.0 × 106/ml) and normozoospermia with higher density (40.0 × 106/ml and more). When they reached the higher grade, those cases were estimated as "Improved". On sperm motility, some were added on "Improved" cases, when cases of less than 40% motility reached more than 60% motility after the treatment. The results were summarized as follows; 1) many "improved" cases were recognized more than 1 year after the start of the treatment, 2) the higher the categorized grade in sperm density was, the higher the improvement rate was and 3) the total improvement rate in seminal findings by the treatment was 52.2% and accumulated pregnancy rate was 19.6%.

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... Vitamin B 12 , also known as cobalamin, has been widely used as therapeutic agent for the treatment of male infertility (Watson 1962;Iwasaki et al. 2003;Chatterjee et al. 2006). This vitamin is a water-soluble vitamin that plays an important role in DNA synthesis and cell division (Oh & Brown 2003) and is an essential cofactor for methionine synthase during the production of purines and pyrimidines (O'Leary & Samman 2010), being essential for the processes that require high cell renewal rate. ...
... Spermatogenic improvement has also been demonstrated when a large amount of vitamin B 12 is given to patients with oligospermia (Sharp & Witts 1962). Moreover, this vitamin has been a therapeutic agent for the treatment of male infertility (Iwasaki et al. 2003;Chatterjee et al. 2006). In rodents, vitamin B 12 is able to recover the doxorubicin-induced testicular damage (Ozaki et al. 1988;Oshio et al. 1989) and stimulates spermatogenesis in cimetidine-treated rats, avoiding tubular atrophy (Beltrame et al. 2011). ...
... Vitamin B 12 has been demonstrated to play an essential role in the maintenance of testicular functions in vitamin B 12 -deficient rodents (Kawata et al. 2004;Watanabe et al. 2007) and has been a therapeutic agent for the treatment of male infertility (Sharp & Witts 1962;Iwasaki et al. 2003;Chatterjee et al. 2006). This vitamin has also been able to recover the doxorubicin-induced testicular damage (Ozaki et al. 1988;Oshio et al. 1989), stimulates spermatogenesis and avoids tubular atrophy in cimetidine-treated rats (Beltrame et al. 2011). ...
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... Table 1 presents a summary of the human studies done on vitamin B12 and its derived compounds, and their reported positive effect on sperm count. [28] (+): increase of parameter. ...
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... 2 Vitamin B 12 has been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of male infertility, especially when the cause is oligozoospermia or asthenozoospermia. 3,4 This vitamin, also known as cobalamin, is a water-soluble vitamin, essential in the nutrition, found in foods of animal origin, including dairy products. This vitamin plays an important role in DNA synthesis and cell division 5 and is an essential cofactor for methionine synthase during the production of purines and pyrimidines. ...
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