ArticlePDF Available

Description Of Three New Species Of Glossogobius From Australia And New Guinea

Authors:

Abstract

The present paper describes two new species of the gobiid fish genus Glossogobius from southern New Guinea and a third related species from northeastern Australia. All three species are restricted to a small number of river systems. Glossogobius bellendenensis, sp. nov. is distinctive in having reduced predorsal scales and fin-ray counts and mental fre-num shape. It is restricted to relatively clear water rivers of northeastern Queensland. The closely related, Glossogobius muscorum sp. nov. is also distinctive in reduced predorsal scales and fin-ray count and is found only in the Fly River system of New Guinea. Glossogobius robertsi sp. nov. is distinctive in fin-ray and scale counts and is found in the Fly River in Papua New Guinea and possibly in a river in Papua close to the Fly River. That species has been confused with Glossogobius giuris, which generally occurs in lower reaches of the river.
Accepted by A. Gill: 19 Nov. 2008; published: 16 Jan. 2008 1
ZOOTAXA
ISSN 1175-5326 (print edition)
ISSN 1175-5334 (online edition)
Copyright © 2009 · Magnolia Press
Zootaxa 1981: 114 (2009)
www.mapress.com/zootaxa/Article
Description of three new species of Glossogobius from Australia and New Guinea
DOUGLASS F. HOESE1 & GERALD R. ALLEN2
1Australian Museum, 6 College St., Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. E-mail: Doug.Hoese@austmus.gov.au
2 Western Australian Museum, Perth, Western Australia
Abstract
The present paper describes two new species of the gobiid fish genus Glossogobius from southern New Guinea and a
third related species from northeastern Australia. All three species are restricted to a small number of river systems.
Glossogobius bellendenensis, sp. nov. is distinctive in having reduced predorsal scales and fin-ray counts and mental fre-
num shape. It is restricted to relatively clear water rivers of northeastern Queensland. The closely related, Glossogobius
muscorum sp. nov. is also distinctive in reduced predorsal scales and fin-ray count and is found only in the Fly River sys-
tem of New Guinea. Glossogobius robertsi sp. nov. is distinctive in fin-ray and scale counts and is found in the Fly River
in Papua New Guinea and possibly in a river in Papua close to the Fly River. That species has been confused with Glos-
sogobius giuris, which generally occurs in lower reaches of the river.
Key words: Glossogobius, Gobiidae, new species, Australia, New Guinea, freshwater
Introduction
The genus Glossogobius (Gill) is one of the most speciose genera of gobioid fishes. The genus is character-
ized by a longitudinal papilla pattern, with at least 6 lines running longitudinally on cheek, 27-30 vertebrae, a
bilobed tongue, gill opening reaching below a point just before to just behind posterior preopercular margin, a
typically lobed mental frenum and a long bony process extending from the preoperculum to the symplectic. In
addition most species have a large mouth (10-15% SL) and depressed head. Currently only 24 valid species
are recognized. Hoese and Allen (1990) estimated that 27 species were known from Australia and New
Guinea. Subsequently new species have been found in the Philippines, Madagascar, South Africa and
Sulawesi bringing the total number of estimated species to over 50. Most of the species fall into the Glossogo-
bius celebius (Valenciennes, 1837) complex, which are characterized by a well developed mental frenum,
such as that shown in Figure 3. Most of the new species are small sized ranging in size as adults from 25–100
mm SL. Only Glossogobius giuris (Hamilton, 1822), Glossogobius aureus Akihito and Meguro, 1975, Glos-
sogobius koragensis Herre, 1935 and Glossogobius olivaceus (Temminck and Schlegel, 1845) reach a size in
excess of 200 mm SL, with some populations of Glossogobius giuris reaching a size of 500 mm in eastern
Africa (Eccles, 1992). Except for the mangrove species, Glossogobius circumpectus (Macleay, 1883), all spe-
cies are normally confined to freshwater as adults.
The present paper describes two new species in the Glossogobius celebius complex from the Fly River in
southern New Guinea and a related species from northeastern Australia.
The material upon which the descriptions are based was collected by the authors from northeastern Aus-
tralia and southern New Guinea and by Tyson Roberts in the Fly River. Roberts (1978) reported on his collec-
tions from the Fly River made in 1975. At that time he recorded Glossogobius celebius and Glossogobius
HOESE & ALLEN
2 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
giuris (recorded as highland and lowland ecotypes). Examination of that material indicated that the species
referred to as Glossogobius celebius was Glossogobius concavifrons (Ramsay and Ogilby, 1886) (which dif-
fers from G. celebius in having more numerous dorsal and anal rays and more precaudal vertebrae). The mate-
rial identified as Glossogobius giuris turned out to be two separate species, corresponding with the ecotype
forms recognized by Roberts. The lowland ecotype proved to be Glossogobius aureus, and the highland eco-
type a separate species, which is described here. The confusion resulted in part from the new species having
large spots on the side of the body, similar to those of Glossogobius giuris. In addition the junior author dis-
covered a second, smaller sized, new species from the Fly River in 1982. That species proved to be very close
to a species only known at the time from the Bellenden Ranges in northeastern Queensland. Because of the
similarity of the species, the Queensland species is described here as well.
Material and methods
Institutional abbreviations follow Leviton et al. (1985). Counts and measurements follow methods outlined in
Hoese and Allen (1990). The transverse scale count is taken of the first row behind the anal spine upward and
backward to the second dorsal origin. The small scale below the base of the first dorsal fin is counted as a half
scale. The longitudinal scale count is taken from the upper pectoral base insertion along the midline to the end
of the hypural plate. Gill raker counts are given as upper + element at angle + lower rakers. Counts for the
holotypes are indicated by asterisks in the descriptions and tables. Gill raker counts were not taken on holo-
types to avoid damaging the specimens. Measurements were taken with dial calipers or with an ocular
micrometer, and all are point-to-point measurements. Papilla terminology follows Akihito and Meguro (1975)
and Hoese (1983). Papilla tracts are numbered as shown in figure 2. Identification of Glossogobius aureus and
G. concavifrons was based on characters outlined in Akihito and Meguro (1975).
Comparative material examined from the Fly River System reported on by Roberts (1978) includes Glos-
sogobius aureus: AMS I.24403–001 (formerly USNM 217245), 15(21–61); USNM 217240, 4(108–127);
USNM 217244, 1(97); USNM 217246, 17(27–60); USNM 217248, 9(30–103); USNM 217250, 9(17–75) and
Glossogobius concavifrons Ramsay & Ogilby, 1886: AMS B.9950, 1(81), holotype; AMS I.24376–001 (for-
merly USNM 21753), 18(14–72); USNM 217252, 43(13–65); USNM 217254, 59(14–89); USNM 217255,
15(22–64); USNM 217256, 2(27–41); USNM 217257, 3(16–64); USNM 217258, 127(14–68); USNM
217259, 1(85); USNM 217260, 52(12–95). Other comparative material includes: Glossogobius ankaranensis
Banister, 1994: holotype, BMNH 1994.12.1.1, 1(51); Glossogobius asaro Whitley, 1959: holotype, AMS
IB.3748A, 1(69); Glossogobius aureus Akihito & Meguro, 1975: holotype NSMT-P.18200, 1(136), syntypes
of Gobius boscii Sauvage, 1880, MNHN A.1922, 5(43-67); Glossogobius bicirrhosus: ZMA 110.979, 8 syn-
types of Gobius bicirrhosus (Weber, 1894), holotype of Illana cacabet Smith & Seale, 1906, USNM 55622,
1(65); Glossogobius brunnoides (Nichols, 1951): holotype, AMNH 19468, 1(83); Glossogobius bulmeri
Whitley, 1959: holotype, AMS IB.3564, 1(51); Glossogobius calidus (Smith, 1937), holotype SAIAB 305,
1(65); Glossogobius celebius (Valenciennes, 1837): syntypes, MNHN 1385, 2(94-95); Glossogobius circum-
spectus (Macleay, 1883): holotype, AMS I.9186, holotype of Glossogobius sandakanensis Inger, 1957,
FMNH 59526, 1(74); Glossogobius coatesi Hoese and Allen, 1990: holotype WAM P.29620-009, 1(97);
Glossogobius flavipinnis (Aurich, 1938): photo of syntype ZMH 419, 1(35); Glossogobius giuris Hamilton,
1822: holotype of Eleotris laticeps De Vis 1884, QM I.220, 1(240), syntypes of Gobius catebus Valenciennes,
1837, MNHN A.1907, 4(39-64); Glossogobius hoesei Allen and Boeseman, 1982: paratypes, RMNH 28489,
20(36-65); Glossogobius kokius (Valenciennes, 1837): syntypes, MNHN 991, 14(41-67), syntypes of Gobius
filosus Valenciennes, 1837, MNHN 989, 3(89-93); Glossogobius koragensis Herre, 1935: holotype, FMNH
17365, 1(141); Glossogobius matanensis (Weber, 1913): 6 syntypes, ZMA 112.665; Glossogobius minutus
Geevarghese and John, 1983: holotype, BMNH 1982.3.31.5, 1(38); Glossogobius obscuripinnis (Peters,
1868): syntypes MNHN 6161, 3(46-51); Glossogobius olivaceus (Temminck & Schelegel, 1845: holotype of
Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 3
THREE NEW GLOSSOGOBIUS SPECIES
Gobius fasciatopunctatus Richardson, 1845, BMNH 1968.3.11.18, 1(126); Glossogobius sparsipalillus Aki-
hito and Meguro, 1976: holotype, NSMT-P.18240, 1(76); Glossogobius tenuiformis Fowler, 1934: holotype,
ANSP 60250, 1(44); Glossogobius torrensis Hoese and Allen, 1990: holotype, WAM P.29615-009, 1(70). In
addition large collections have been examined in collections of the Australian Museum, Museum and Art Gal-
lery of the Northern Territory, Queensland Museum and Western Australian Museum, which will be reported
on separately in reviews of Australian and New Guinea species.
Glossogobius robertsi, sp. nov.
Figures 1–4, Tables 1–3
Glossogobius giuris. —Roberts, 1978: 61 (Fly River, in part, figures b and c).
Glossogobius sp. 7. —Allen, 1991: 185, pl. 15, fig. 7 (Papua New Guinea).
Holotype. WAM P.27803–009, 132 mm SL male. Ok Tedi River system tributary 10 km S. of Tabubil on
Kiunga Rd. (5°21'S, 141°17'E), G. Allen and J. Paska, 17 September, 1982.
Paratypes (all from Fly River System, Papua New Guinea). AMNH 13788, 2(92–130), Upper Fly River,
Archibold Expedition, Rand & Tate, 1936; AMS I.27510–001[ex WAM P.27803–006], 2(51–90), collected
with holotype; NTM S.14819–002, 3(49–91), Ok Mani, Fly River, Ok Tedi Mining, 31 May 1983; USNM
217239, 1(62), small tributaries and mainstream, 1–2 km upstream from mouth of Elevala River, 856 km
upriver from Toro Pass (6°03'S, 141°24'E), T. Roberts, 26 October, 1975; USNM 217242, 2(28–37), 7 km
NNE of Ningerum, approximately 900 km upriver from Toro Pass (5°37'S, 141°10'E), T. Roberts, 4 Novem-
ber, 1975; WAM P.27803–006, 9 (37–106), taken with holotype; WAM P.28143–004, 1(91), Ok Mani River, 5
km E of Tabubil (5°16'S, 141°11'E), G. Allen & D. Balloch, 9 September, 1983.
Non-type Material. NTM S.14681, 1(52), Ajkwa River, Papua.
Diagnosis:A species of Glossogobius with mental frenum formed by short lateral lobes; cheek and oper-
culum naked; predorsal scaled to near eye; pectoral base and prepelvic area only partly scaled; second dorsal
fin-rays I,9-10; anal-fin rays I,8; pectoral rays usually 19; predorsal scale count 16-22; pelvic fin oval, slightly
thickened, length subequal to or slightly longer than wide; midsides with large brown spots (much larger than
eye length); no black spot posteriorly on first dorsal fin; cheek papilla lines composed of single row of papil-
lae; papilla line 6 absent and vertebrae usually 12+16.
Description: Based on 21 specimens 28 – 132 mm SL. First dorsal spines 6(19*); gill rakers on outer face
of first arch 0+1+5(2), 0+1+6(1), 1+1+5(1), 1+1+6(3), 1+1+7(5), 2+1+6(1), 2+1+7(1); segmented caudal-fin
rays 17(19*); branched caudal rays 7/6(2), 7/7(9), 7/8(3), 8/7(2*); vertebrae 11+17(1), 12+16(8*); predorsal
scale count 16(1), 17(2), 18(2), 19(2), 20(3), 21(1), 22(2*); longitudinal scale count 30(1), 31(2), 32(7),
33(6*), 34(2); transverse scale count (TRB) 9.5(10*), 10.5(4). Second dorsal-fin rays I,9–10; anal-fin rays I,8;
pectoral-fin rays 18–19, usually 19 (see Tables 1–3).
Head depressed, 28–33% SL in specimens less than 80 mm SL, 32–35% SL in specimens greater than 80
mm SL. Cheeks bulbous. Interorbital narrow, much less than eye length. Snout short, rounded in dorsal view,
slightly convex in side view; 6–10% SL in specimens less than 80 mm SL, 10–11% SL in specimens greater
than 80 mm SL. Eye about 1.5 in snout, 6–8% SL in specimens less than 80 mm SL, 5–6% SL in specimens
greater than 80 mm SL. Small bump below anterior nostrils present. Anterior nostril at end of short tube, well
above upper lip (2–4 nostril diameters above). Posterior nostril pore midway between upper lip and eye and
2–3 nostril diameters from anterior nostril. Posterior preopercular margin without spine. Preoperculum short,
distance from end of eye to upper posterior preopercular margin subequal to eye in specimens less than 60 mm
SL to twice eye in specimens over 100 mm SL. Mental fraenum with posterior margin concave, short lateral
lobes fused to chin. Mouth moderate, reaching to below or just before mideye; jaws forming an angle of
35–40° with body axis, upper margin of upper jaw in line with lower margin of pupil to midpupil. Upper jaw
HOESE & ALLEN
4 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
11.5–12.8 % SL in specimens less than 60 mm SL, 12.5–14.8% SL in specimens greater than 60 mm SL. Pos-
torbital long, subequal to or slightly longer than distance from tip of snout to posterior margin of eye. Gill
opening reaching to below a point about 1 pupil diameter before posterior preopercular margin. Teeth in upper
jaw: outer row of teeth conical, slightly enlarged and wideset, three inner rows of smaller depressible,
inwardly directed teeth, innermost row larger than middle row. Teeth in lower jaw: teeth in outer row conical,
slightly enlarged and wideset anteriorly, one inner row of smaller depressible. Tongue tip bilobed. Gill rakers
on outer face of first arch short and broad; about one-fifth filament length. Rakers on inner face of first arch
and other arches short and denticulate. Predorsal area scaled forward to just behind, with a naked patch from
eye to midway to posterior preopercular margin. Cheek naked. Operculum naked. Pectoral base with few
scales, one row dorsally and three ventrally, often naked in specimens less than 40 mm SL. Prepelvic area
sparsely scaled, with minute embedded scales just before pelvic origin, covering less than half the area, some-
times naked in specimens less than 40 mm SL. Belly fully scaled. Body covered mostly with large ctenoid
scales, cycloid on predorsal area (ctenoid in young), pectoral base, prepelvic area and midline of belly. First
dorsal fin low, with rounded margin, spines 4–6 extending beyond other spines when fin depressed. Second
dorsal fin subequal in height to first dorsal fin. Anal fin subequal in height to dorsal fins. Pectoral fin with
pointed to acutely rounded margin, reaching to or just beyond anus. Pelvic disc rounded, rays slightly thick-
ened, length of fin subequal to or slightly greater than width; fifth ray with 10–20 terminal tips; fin reaching
about a pupil diameter short of anus in specimens less than 60 mm SL to about half way to anus in larger spec-
imens.
Head pores: nasal pore usually in front of posterior nostril and above anterior nostril (above posterior
nostril on one side of one specimen); anterior interorbital pore present; posterior interorbital pore present; pos-
torbital pore behind eye present; infraorbital pore below postorbital present; lateral canal pore above preoper-
culum present; lateral canal pore above posterior preopercular margin absent; terminal lateral canal pore
above posterior preoperculum present; short tube above operculum, with pore at each end present; 3 preoper-
cular pores, upper in line with lower margin of eye, widely separated from lower 2.
FIGURE 1. Holotype of Glossogobius robertsi, WAM P.27803–009, 132 mm SL.
Sensory Papillae: (Figure 2). Line 1 (before nasal pore) short and composed of single row of papillae.
Line 2 (medially between nasal pores) composed of single row of papillae, beginning well above posterior
nostril, continuous across snout or with gap on midline of snout. Line 5 (suborbital) composed of single row
of papillae, line curved ventrally anteriorly meeting line 7 below anterior margin of eye. Line 6 (suborbital
branch) absent. Lines 7, 9, 10 (VL cheek rows) each composed of single row of papillae. Line 8 and 11 (VT
row) short, not reaching posterior preopercular margin. Line 12 (Outer POP-mandibular) composed of single
row of papillae, with large gap adjacent to end of jaws. Line 13 (Inner POP-mandibular) composed of double
row of papillae at sides of chin, a single row of papillae posteriorly. Line 20 (OP VT) opercular segment com-
posed of single row well separated from oblique row just above posterior preopercular margin, row extends
Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 5
THREE NEW GLOSSOGOBIUS SPECIES
ventrally curving forward on to branchiostegal membranes. Line 21 (Upper OT) composed of a single row of
papillae, curved downward posteriorly. Line 22 (Lower OT) composed of a single row of papillae in a short
segment extending posteriorly upward, not meeting line 21. Several vertical papillae rows on belly. A single
curved line anteriorly on most body scales (often obscure dorsally and posteriorly. Chin papillae arranged in
distinct TL lines behind mental fraenum following contour of fraenum.
FIGURE 2. Sensory papilla pattern of Glossogobius robertsi based on paratype, USNM217239, 62mm SL.
Coloration in alcohol: Head and body brown. Eye with one or two short cross bands on dorsal margin.
Cheek with small scattered dark brown spots; a broad stripe (width about equal to pupil diameter) from
anteroventral margin of eye to upper lip; chin dark brown in both sexes; branchiostegal membranes light
brown. Body scales densely pigmented with brown spots, not edged in dark brown; a small black spot (less
than half pupil diameter) behind eye; a second spot of similar size on nape just above anterior part of opercu-
lum. Back with saddles above and often connected to midside spots; midside of body with 5 very large round
spots (subequal to eye size or slightly larger); first spot below middle of first dorsal fin, usually connected to
dark saddle below dorsal fin, forming an oblique band, second below second dorsal origin and just behind
(also sometimes connected to dorsal saddle to form an oblique band, third below posterior end of second dor-
sal fin (also sometimes connected to dorsal saddle forming an oblique band), fourth on middle of caudal
peduncle fin (rarely connected to dorsal saddle forming an oblique band); and fifth on posterior end of caudal
peduncle, without a saddle dorsally. First dorsal fin without large black spots posteriorly. A dark brown spot
or short horizontal bar dorsally on pectoral fin base, often with brown mottling on upper half of pectoral base;
sometimes with a short horizontal bar ventrally on pectoral fin base.
First dorsal fin grey to brown, with distinct bands formed by dark brown spots on fin; usually a broad dark
brown or black stripe at base of fin. Second dorsal fin with small brown spots forming 3–4 longitudinal rows
basally, followed by a clear or pale gray band and dark gray band at distal tip. Caudal fin with 8–11 broad
wavy bands, not extending onto lowermost 5–6 segmented caudal-fin rays, but extending onto all but upper
one or two segmented caudal-fin rays. Anal fin gray to brown, with no mottling or banding. Pelvic fin brown
to black, often light brown in females less than 50 mm SL. Pectoral fin uniform gray to brown and no spotting.
Distribution: Glossogobius robertsi is known from several locations from the Upper Fly River system,
usually in creeks above 500 m elevation. Also possibly known from the Ajkwa River in the Timika region of
Papua Province (Indonesia), which lies approximately 500 km west of the Upper Fly (see Remarks).
HOESE & ALLEN
6 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
FIGURE 3. Mental frenum of Glossogobius robertsi based on paratype, AMS I.27510–001, 90 mm SL.
FIGURE 4. Glossogobius robertsi NTM S.14681, 52 mm SL from Ajkwa River, Papua.
Similarity to other species: Glossogobius robertsi is easily separated from other species (Glossogobius
celebius, G. tor re ntis , G. coatesi and other species described as new herein) with a developed lobed mental fre-
num by the large spots on the side of the body, the reduced scale coverage on the pectoral base and prepelvic
area, short round pelvic fin and absence of opercular scales.
Remarks: A single specimen 52 mm female (NTM S.14681) from the Ajkwa River in Papua is tenta-
tively identified as the current species (Figure 4). The specimen agrees in coloration, particularly the large
spots on the side with G. robertsi, but differs in having second dorsal-fin rays I,8 and anal-fin rays I,7, lower
counts than in other specimens.
Etymology: Named for Tyson Roberts who collected most of the type material.
TABLE 1. Second dorsal-ray counts in three species of Glossogobius.
I,9 I,10 I,11
Glossogobius robertsi 8* 11 -
Glossogobius bellendenensis 350*11
Glossogobius muscorum 1* 7 -
Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 7
THREE NEW GLOSSOGOBIUS SPECIES
TABLE 2. Anal-ray counts in three species of Glossogobius.
TABLE 3. Pectoral-ray counts in three species of Glossogobius.
Glossogobius bellendenensis, sp. nov.
(Figs. 5–8a, Tables 1–3)
Glossogobius sp. 4. —Allen et al., 2002: 272.
Holotype. AMS I.22715–004, 43 mm SL male, Eubenagee Swamp, near Innisfail, 17°24'S, 145°58'E, 1 Octo-
ber, 1981, D. Hoese & R. Winterbottom.
Paratypes (all from Russell and Mulgrave Rivers, Queensland). AMS I.21266–001, 3(34–46), 17°14' S,
145°46'E, 16 September, 1979, D. Hoese, Mulgrave River; AMS I.22061–001, 7(27–40), 17°10'S, 145°50'E,
20 September, 1980, D. Hoese & H. Larson, Mulgrave River; AMS I.22063–001, 7(26–39), 17°10'S,
145°50'E, 20 September, 1980, D. Hoese & H. Larson, Mulgrave River; AMS I.22066–001, 6(25–27),
17°10'S, 145°50'E, 20 September, 1980, D. Hoese & H. Larson, Mulgrave River; AMS I.22068–001,
6(28–56), 17°10'S, 145°48'E, 20 September, 1980, D. Hoese, Mulgrave River; AMS I.22712–001, 2(34–35),
Goldsborough Forest, Mulgrave River, 17°07'S, 145°47' E; 30 September, 1981, D. Hoese; AMS
I.22715–002, 7(33–39), taken with holotype; QM I.20150, 1(47), Creek 2 km south of Russell River Mouth,
November, 1982, R.J. McKay & J. Johnson; QM I.29397, 8(40–61), Behana Creek, tributary of Mulgrave
River, 17°09'S, 145°49'E, 13 July 1994, P. Graham; QM I.29410, 2(34–37), Behana Creek, tributary of Rus-
sell River, 17°08'S, 145°50'E, 16 August, 1994, P. Graham; QM I.29723, 2(32–40), Kearneys Creek, tributary
of Mulgrave River, 17°14'S, 145°46'E, 4 December, 1994, K. McDonald; QM I.29998, 4(36–45), Russell
River, 17°28'S, 145°52'E, 25 August, 1994, P. Hales; QM I.30917, 1(53), Josephine Creek, on Josephine Falls
Road, 17°25'S, 145°54'E, 12 June, 1997, J. Short; QM I.34747, 1(52), Russell River, 17°28'S, 145°52'E, 1
December, 1993, Queensland Fisheries Service; QM I.34754, 2(31–38), Dinner Creek, tributary of Russell
River, 17°25'S, 145°60 22, February 1994, Queensland Fisheries Service; WAM P.26970–001, 2(39–42), 8
kms east of Mt. Bellenden Ker, 17°17'S, 145°47'E, 20 September, 1980, D. Hoese, Mulgrave River.
Non-type material: QUEENSLAND: AMS I.22061–002, 4(29–33), cleared and stained, 17°10'S,
145°50'E, Mulgrave River; QM I.20754, 3(22–29), Mulgrave River, 17°11'S, 145°43'E, 17 January 1984, S.H.
Midgley; QM I.30461, 2(32–34), Little Falls Creek, Mossman, 16°23'S, 145°20'E 27, September, 1995, P.
Hales; QM I.30467, 3(33–49), Saltwater Creek, Mossman, 16°25'S, 145°21'E, 4 October, 1995, P. Hales; QM
I.30469, 3(37–47), Bamboo Creek, Mossman, 16°21'S, 145°23'E, 10 October, 1995, P. Hales; QM I.30471,
6(19–45), Whyanbeel Creek, Miallo, 16°24'S, 145°21'E 27 September, 1995, P. Hales; QM I.30473,
4(28–43), Chinamans Creek, Miallo, 16°22'S, 145°21'E, 3 October, 1995, P. Hales; QM I.30478, 5(21–40),
Boulder Creek, Miallo, 16°22'S, 145°20'E, 3 October, 1995, P. Hales; QM I.35990, 5(31–48), Saltwater
Creek, 16°25'S, 145°21’E, 9 June 2004, F. Kroon.
I,7 I,8 I,9
Glossogobius robertsi - 19* -
Glossogobius bellendenensis 2 32* 9
Glossogobius muscorum 1* 5 1
15 16 17 18 19
Glossogobius robertsi - - - 2 17*
Glossogobius bellendenensis 2 31* 31 3 -
Glossogobius muscorum - 4 4*--
HOESE & ALLEN
8 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
Diagnosis: Mental fraenum bilobed, with lateral lobes broad and attached to chin, with a posteromedian
attachment sometimes giving the appearance of a third lobe; predorsal area partly scaled, midline scales
extending no farther forward than posterior preopercular margin; cheek, operculum, pectoral base, prepelvic
area and anterior midline of belly naked; first dorsal fin with one or two large black spots posteriorly; second
dorsal-fin rays usually I,10; anal-fin rays I,8; pectoral-fin rays usually 16–17; predorsal scale count 2–14;
cheek papilla lines composed of single row of papillae; papilla line 6 absent and vertebrae usually 12+16.
FIGURE 5. Holotype of Glossogobius bellendenensis, AMS I.22715–004, 43 mm SL.
FIGURE 6. Freshly collected paratype of Glossogobius bellendenensis from Mulgrave River, Queensland, AMS
I.22712–001
Description: Based on 65 specimens 25–61 mm SL. First dorsal spines 5(1), 6(63)*; gill rakers on outer
face of first arch 0+0+6, 0+1+5(2), 0+1+6(3), 0+1+7(1), 1+1+6(2), 1+1+7(1); segmented caudal-fin rays
16(2), 17(35*); branched caudal rays 7/6(1), 7/7(6*); vertebrae 11+16(1), 11+17(2), 12+16(20); predorsal
scale count 2(2), 3(1), 4(1), 5(2), 6(2), 7(7), 8(2*), 9(14), 10(8), 11(8), 12(4), 14(1); longitudinal scale count
27(1), 28(4), 29(16), 30(23), 31(5*), 32(2); transverse scale count (TRB) 8.5(26*), 9.5(23). second dorsal-fin
rays usually I,10; anal-fin rays I,8; pectoral-fin rays usually 16–17 (see Tables 1–3).
Head depressed, 27.2–30.6%SL. Snout short, broadly rounded in dorsal view; straight to convex in side
view; 8.2–8.8% SL. Cheeks tapering. Interorbital narrow, less than eye length. Eye about 1–1.2 in snout,
7.2–8.6% SL. Small bump below anterior nostril present. Anterior nostril at end of short tube, just above
upper lip. Posterior nostril 1–2 nostril diameters from eye and 1–2 from anterior nostril, posterior nostril vary-
ing from midway between eye and upper lip to closer to eye than upper lip. Posterior preopercular margin
without spine. Preoperculum short, distance from end of eye to upper posterior preopercular margin slightly
less than eye. Mental fraenum bilobed, with lateral lobes broad and attached to chin and with a posteromedian
attachment sometimes giving the appearance of a third lobe. Mouth small, reaching to below anterior quarter
of eye; jaws forming an angle of 35–40° with body axis; upper margin of upper jaw in line with middle to just
Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 9
THREE NEW GLOSSOGOBIUS SPECIES
above lower margin of eye. Upper jaw 10–12.1% SL. Gill opening reaching to below or just behind posterior
preopercular margin. Teeth in upper jaw: outer row of teeth conical, slightly enlarged and wideset, 2–3 inner
rows of smaller depressible, inwardly directed teeth, innermost row larger than middle row. Teeth in lower
jaw: teeth in outer row conical, slightly enlarged and wideset anteriorly, 2–3 inner rows of smaller depressible
teeth. Tongue tip with shallow notch, distinctly bilobed. Gill rakers on outer face of first arch short and trian-
gular; longest raker about one-third filament length. Rakers on inner face of first arch and other arches short
and denticulate. Predorsal area partly scaled, often with scales at side extending farther forward than scales on
midline, sides scaled forward to a point above middle of operculum to just behind eye, midline naked or with
scales extending forward to just before posterior preopercular margin, midline sometimes with some small
scales forward to above posterior end of operculum and area immediately adjacent to midline naked, but
partly scaled along sides of nape. Cheek naked. Operculum naked. Pectoral base naked. Prepelvic area naked.
Belly with a large naked area behind pelvic insertion. Body covered mostly with large ctenoid scales, cycloid
anterior of line from second dorsal origin to upper pectoral origin and on belly. First dorsal fin low, with
rounded margin; spines 3–5 extending beyond other spines when fin depressed; origin well behind pelvic
insertion. Second dorsal fin subequal in height to first dorsal fin. Anal fin slightly lower than dorsal fins. Pec-
toral fin with rounded margin, reaching to above anal origin or slightly beyond. Pelvic disc moderately thick,
slightly longer than wide, reaching to below anus; fifth ray with 6–9 terminal tips.
Head pores: nasal pore above posterior nostril; anterior interorbital pore present; posterior interorbital
pore present; postorbital pore behind eye present; infraorbital pore below postorbital present; lateral canal
pore above preoperculum present; lateral canal pore above posterior preopercular margin absent; terminal lat-
eral canal pore above operculum present; short tube above operculum, with pore at each end present, repre-
sented by open trough or often absent in small specimens (below 20 mm SL); 3 preopercular pores, upper in
line with lower margin of eye; middle pore closer to lower pore than to upper.
Sensory Papillae: (Figure 7; lines listed below all composed of single row of papillae).
Line 1 (before nasal pore) present. Line 2 (between nasal pores) curved, with gap at midline of snout. Line 5
(suborbital) reaching to or almost to line 7 before eye. Line 6 (suborbital branch) absent. Lines 7, 9, 10 (VL
cheek rows) each reaching near to posterior preopercular margin. Lines 8 and 11 (VT row) ending near to pre-
opercular margin. Line 12 (Outer POP-mandibular) with a gap at end of jaws. Line 13 (Inner POP-mandibu-
lar) slightly curved near end of jaws. Line 20 (OP VT) branched ventrally. Line 21 (Upper OT) curved. Line
22 (Lower OT) without branches, not connected to line 21. Several vertical papillae rows on belly. A single
curved line anteriorly on most body scales (often obscure dorsally and posteriorly); chin papillae in 5 to 7
transverse rows laterally and 2–3 rows medially, forming a bilobed patch, with the lobes directed posteriorly.
Coloration: Head and body brown. Head with small scattered dark brown spots; a broad stripe from
anteroventral margin of eye to above middle of upper lip, not extending onto lip; a short stripe from poster-
oventral margin of eye extending a short distance onto cheek, often with a dark brown spot posteroventrally to
bar (sometimes connected to bar); chin and isthmus dark brown, rest of ventral surface of head lighter; mental
frenum dark brown; lips dark brown except for white at posterior tip, no bars crossing lips. Body dark brown
from midside dorsally and pale brown ventrally; an irregular shaped dark brown spot or bar above pectoral
base. An oblique brown bar or spot on belly below anterior part of first dorsal fin, extending from midside
ventrally; an irregular brown spot below posterior part of first dorsal fin, extending a short distance dorsally
from midside; a series of elongate spots posterior to first dorsal fin on midside, each covering 2–3 scales in
longitudinal direction along midside, usually not extending onto scales above or below midside; first spot
below first dorsal origin, covering 2–3 scales, second below and just before middle of second dorsal fin, cov-
ering 2 scales, third spot covering 2–3 scales below end of second dorsal fin, fourth covering 2 scales anteri-
orly on middle of caudal peduncle, fifth covering two scales on middle of caudal peduncle, sixth at posterior
end of caudal peduncle, expanding into a short vertical bar on caudal fin base (bar on caudal fin base some-
times separate from caudal peduncle spot); a series of V-shaped saddles dorsally below dorsal fin, arranged
HOESE & ALLEN
10 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
above space between midside spots. Pectoral fin base with a short brown bar or small spot extending onto base
of pectoral rays. First dorsal fin with scattered black spots in 2–3 oblique rows, posterior end of first dorsal fin
with larger black spot surrounding middle of sixth spine extending posteriorly to end of fin (often separated
into two spots). Second dorsal fin with black spots forming 2 rows ventrally, distal margin of fin dark brown.
Pectoral fins brown without spots. Caudal fin with central rays covered with brown spots forming wavy bands
(usually 4–6) on dorsal two-thirds of fin, ventral and dorsal thirds gray to light brown. Anal fin whitish
basally, distal one-quarter to one-third dark brown. Pelvic fins gray to dark brown.
FIGURE 7. Sensory papilla pattern of Glossogobius bellendenensis based on paratype, AMS I.22061–001, 50mm SL.
FIGURE 8. a. Mental frenum of Glossogobius bellendenensis based on holotype; b. Mental frenum of Glossogobius
muscorum based on holotype.
Distribution: Glossogobius bellendenensis is known only from the Russell, Mulgrave and Mossman riv-
ers and creeks near Cairns in north-eastern Queensland from above tidal influence to altitudes of a few hun-
dred metres. The species is typically found in clear, flowing streams, with coarse sand and medium to large
sized rocks, in open or in forested areas.
Similarity to other species: Glossogobius bellendenensis is readily distinguished from other species of
Glossogobius in dorsal and anal-ray counts, reduced predorsal scale coverage, absence of scales of prepelvic
area and pectoral base and distinctive shape of the mental frenum. It shares most of those characteristics with
Glossogobius muscorum from the Fly River in New Guinea. Glossogobius bellendensis differs from that spe-
Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 11
THREE NEW GLOSSOGOBIUS SPECIES
cies in coloration, in usually having 12+16 vertebrae (versus 11+17), and a trilobed mental frenum (versus
bilobed). The coloration differences include lacking a horizontal brown stripe on the cheek below the eye, an
oval brown spot on the anteromedian margin of the operculum and white on the posterior end of lips, charac-
teristic of G. muscorum. It addition there are two large spots on the midside on the belly (versus one large
blotch on the side of the belly).
The species can be confused with Glossogobius concavifrons, which has scales on the pectoral base and
prepelvic area, predorsal scales reaching to near eye, more numerous precaudal vertebrae (13–15) and more
compressed head. Currently the two species are not known to be sympatric. Glossogobius concavifrons is
known from rivers of western Cape York to Arnhem Land in Australia and southern New Guinea. Separation
of juveniles below 20 mm SL is difficult because the scales are not well developed in Glossogobius concavi-
frons at that size.
Remarks: The predorsal scales development varies considerably in this species. Specimens from the
Mossman River generally have scales on the midline of the nape extending forward to between a point above
the anterior operculum and posterior preoperculum, while specimens from the Russell and Mulgrave rivers
often lack scales on the midline or have scales extending up to above the middle of the operculum, rarely to
above the posterior preopercular margin. Specimens from Whyanbeel Creek, Miallo (QM I.30471) are atypi-
cal in having 3 of 6 specimens with an anal ray count of I,7 and the others with I,8. Because of the slight dif-
ferences between the Russell-Mulgrave and Mossman specimens, the specimens from the Mossman area are
excluded from the type series.
Kroon and Johnson (2006) document Queensland records of this species. Although the species currently
is restricted in its distribution, it may have been mistaken for juveniles of other species because of the small
size of the species. Consequently it is likely to be more widely distributed in Australia.
Etymology: Named for the Bellenden Ker Range, where the species was first discovered.
Glossogobius muscorum, sp. nov.
(Figs. 8b–10, Tables 1–3)
Glossogobius sp. 11.—Allen, 1991: 186, pl. 16, fig. 13 (Papua New Guinea).
Holotype. WAM P.27807–010, 45 mm SL female, creek 7 km N of Kiunga on Tabubil Road, 6°03'S, 141°18'
E, 20 September, 1982, G. Allen & J. Paska.
Paratypes. Fly River System, Papua New Guinea: AMS I.44119-001 (formerly WAM P.27796-003),
2(26–27), small creek 32 km N of Kiunga on Tabubil Rd., 5°55'S, 141°17'E, 16 September, 1982, G. Allen &
J. Paska; WAM P.27793–007, 1(39), small creek near Port at Kiunga, 6°07' S, 141°18'E, 16 September, 1982,
G. Allen & J. Paska; WAM P.27795–003, 3(23–37), small creek 16 km N of Kiunga on Tabubil Rd., 5°58'S,
141°17'E, 16 September, 1982, G. Allen & J. Paska; WAM P.27807–004, 3(33–36), taken with holotype.
Diagnosis: A species of Glossogobius with bilobed mental frenum; predorsal area with scales extending
forward to just before posterior preopercular margin; cheek, operculum, pectoral base, prepelvic area and
anterior midline of belly naked; first dorsal fin with 3 dark spots, centred on fourth, fifth and sixth dorsal
spine, respectively; second dorsal-fin rays usually I,10; anal-fin rays I,8; pectoral-fin rays 16–17; predorsal
scale count 11-13; cheek papilla lines composed of single row of papillae; papilla line 6 absent and vertebrae
11+17.
Description: Based on 8 specimens 24–44 mm SL. First dorsal spines 6(8*); gill rakers on outer face of
first arch 0+6(1), 0+1+6(1), 0+1+7(1), 1+1+6(2), 1+1+7(1); segmented caudal-fin rays 17(8*); branched cau-
dal rays 7/6(1), 7/7(6*); vertebrae 11+17 (10*); predorsal scale count 11(2), 12(4*), 13(2); longitudinal scale
count 27(2), 28(1), 29(5*); transverse scale count (TRB) 7.5(3), 8.5(5*). Second dorsal-fin rays usually I,10;
anal-fin rays I,8; pectoral-fin rays 16–17 (see Tables 1–3).
HOESE & ALLEN
12 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
FIGURE 9. Holotype of Glossogobius muscorum WAM P.27807–001, 45 mm SL
FIGURE 10. Sensory papillae of Glossogobius muscorum based on WAM P.27793–007, 39 mm SL.
Head depressed, 30.9–34.6% SL. Snout short, broadly rounded in dorsal view; convex (with notch before
eye) in side view; 8.5–11.5% SL. Eye slightly shorter than snout, 9.5–12.3% SL. Cheeks tapering. Interorbital
narrow, less than eye length. Upper jaw 9.7–12.3% SL. Small bump below anterior nostril present. Anterior
nostril at end of short tube, just above upper lip. Posterior nostril 1 nostril diameter from anterior nostril and
midway between eye and upper lip. Posterior preopercular margin without spine. Preoperculum short, dis-
tance from end of eye to upper posterior preopercular margin much less than eye (one-half to three-quarters of
eye). Postorbital short, subequal to distance from tip of snout to mideye. Mental fraenum bilobed, with lateral
lobes broad and attached to chin and not free distal margins. Mouth small, reaching to below anterior quarter
of eye; jaws forming an angle of 35–40° with body axis; upper margin of upper jaw in line with middle of eye.
Gill opening reaching to below or just behind posterior preopercular margin. Teeth in upper jaw: outer row of
teeth conical, slightly enlarged and wideset, 2–3 inner rows of smaller depressible, inwardly directed teeth,
innermost row larger than middle row. Teeth in lower jaw: teeth in outer row conical, slightly enlarged and
wideset anteriorly, 2–3 inner rows of smaller depressible teeth. Tongue tip bilobed. Gill rakers on outer face of
first arch slender and short; longest about one-fifth filament length. Rakers on inner face of first arch and other
arches short and denticulate. Predorsal area with scales extending forward to just before posterior preopercu-
lar margin. Cheek naked. Operculum naked. Pectoral base naked. Prepelvic area naked. Belly with a large
naked area behind pelvic insertion. Body covered mostly with large ctenoid scales, cycloid on midline of
belly. First dorsal fin low, with rounded margin, spines 3–5 extending beyond other spines when fin
Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press · 13
THREE NEW GLOSSOGOBIUS SPECIES
depressed, origin well behind pelvic insertion. Second dorsal fin subequal in height to first dorsal fin. Anal fin
slightly lower than dorsal fins. Pectoral fin with pointed margin, reaching to between anus and anal origin.
Pelvic disc moderately thick, slightly longer than wide, reaching to below anus; fifth ray with 7–9 terminal
tips.Head pores: nasal pore above posterior nostril; anterior interorbital pore present; posterior interorbital
pore present; postorbital pore behind eye present; infraorbital pore below postorbital present; lateral canal
pore above preoperculum present; lateral canal pore above posterior preopercular margin absent; terminal lat-
eral canal pore above anterior operculum present; short tube above operculum, with pore at each end present,
represented by open trough or often absent in small specimens (below 20 mm SL); 3 preopercular pores,
upper in line with lower margin of eye; widely separated from lower 2 pores.
Sensory Papillae: (Figure 10; lines listed below all composed of single row of papillae, except where
noted). Line 1 (before nasal pore) present. Line 2 (between nasal pores) curved, with gap at midline of snout.
Line 5 (suborbital) reaching to line 7 before eye. Line 6 (suborbital branch) absent. Lines 7, 9, 10 (VL cheek
rows) each reaching near posterior preopercular margin. Lines 8 and 11 (VT row) ending short of posterior
preopercular margin. Line 12 (Outer POP-mandibular) with a gap at end of jaws. Line 13 (Inner POP-mandib-
ular) curved near end of jaws (line composed of two rows of papillae on chin only). Line 20 (OP VT)
branched ventrally. Line 21 (Upper OT) strongly curved, becoming vertical posteriorly in some paratypes,
often almost reaching line 22. Line 22 (Lower OT) without branches. Several vertical papillae rows on belly.
A single curved line anteriorly on most body scales (often obscure dorsally and posteriorly).
Coloration: Head and body brown. Head with an elongate brown spot behind posterior margin of eye, an
elongate bar above operculum, a small brown spot dorsoposteriorly on operculum, a dark brown bar from
anteroventral margin of eye to middle of upper lip, a horizontal brown stripe on cheek below eye and an oval
brown spot on anteromedian margin of operculum; posterior end of lips whitish. Pectoral base with a slightly
oblique brown bar on upper base. Two rows of small brown spots on back extending from above pectoral base
to below middle of second dorsal fin; midside with one large blotch on side of belly and a series of brown
spots along midside (number of scales spots cover indicated in parentheses), first spot below second dorsal
origin (2), 3 (1–2, 2, 1) below second dorsal fin, one (3) on middle of caudal peduncle and last (2) on caudal
peduncle, confluent with triangular spot on base of caudal. Fins dark, dorsal and caudal fins spotted, caudal
fin grey dorsally and ventrally, spots confined to middle rays; first dorsal fin with a small oval spot along
fourth dorsal spine and a darker oval spot centred on fifth dorsal spine and similar spot centred on sixth dorsal
spine; pectoral fin grey (lighter than other fins); pelvic disc dark brown; anal fin without spots.
Distribution: Glossogobius muscorum is known only from the upper Fly River system in the vicinity of
Kiunga and Ningerum at distances between about 840–900 km upstream from the sea. It generally occurs in
rainforest creeks at elevations below 50 m.
Similarity to other species: Glossogobius muscorum is most similar to G. bellendenensis from Queen-
sland. All are characterised by reduced predorsal scale coverage, no prepelvic or pectoral base scales and
small body size (see discussion of G. bellendenensis for comparison of these species).
The species can also be confused with the sympatric Glossogobius concavifrons, which has scales on the
pectoral base and prepelvic area, predorsal scales reaching to near the eye, more numerous precaudal verte-
brae (13–15) and a more compressed head. Separation of juveniles below 20 mm SL is difficult because the
scales are not well developed in Glossogobius concavifrons at that size.
Etymology: From the genitive of the Latin muscus (fly) referring to the type locality, ‘of the Fly River’
Literature cited
Akihito & Meguro, K. (1975) Description of a new gobiid fish, Glossogobius aureus, with notes on related species of the
genus. Japanese Journal of Ichthyology, 22(3), 127–142.
HOESE & ALLEN
14 · Zootaxa 1981 © 2009 Magnolia Press
Akihito & Meguro, K. (1976) Glossogobius sparsipapillus, a new species of goby from Vietnam. Japanese Journal of
Ichthyology, 23(1), 9–11.
Allen, G.R. (1991) Field Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of New Guinea. Christensen Research Institute, Madang, Publi-
cation No. 9, 268 pp.
Allen, G.R. & Boeseman, M. (1982) A collection of freshwater fishes from western New Guinea with descriptions of two
new species (Gobiidae and Eleotridae). Records of the Western Australian Museum, 10(2), 67–103.
Allen, G.R., Midgley, S.H. & Allen, M. (2002) Field Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of Australia. Western Australian
Museum, Perth, 394 pp.
Aurich, H.J. (1938) Mitteilung XXVIII der Wallacea-Expedition Woltereck. Die Gobiiden. (Ordnung : Gobioidea). Inter-
nationale Revue der gesamten Hydrobiologie und Hydrographie, 38(1/2), 125–183.
Banister, K. (1994) Glossogobius ankaranensis, a new species of blind cave goby from Madagascar (Pisces: Gobioidei:
Gobiidae). Aqua - Journal of Ichthyologi and Aquatic Biology, 1(3), 25–28.
De Vis, C. (1884) New fishes in the Queensland Museum. No. 4. Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South
Wales, (1) 9(3), 685–698.
Eccles, D.H. (1992) FAO Species Identification Sheets for Fishery Purposes. Field Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of
Tanzania. FAO, Rome, 145 pp.
Fowler, H.W. (1934) Fishes obtained by Mr. H.W. Bell-Marley chiefly in Natal and Zululand in 1929 to 1932. Proceed-
ings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 86, 405–514.
Geevarghese, C. & John, P.A. (1983) A new goby, Glossogobius minutus (Teleostei: Gobiidae) from the southwest coast
of India. Journal of Fish Biology, 22, 231–240.
Hamilton, F. (1822) An Account of the Fishes Found in the River Ganges and its Branches. Archibald Constable, Edin-
burgh, 405 pp.
Herre, A.W. (1935) New fishes obtained by the Crane Pacific Expedition. Field Museum of Natural History, Zoological
Series, 18(12), 383–438.
Hoese, D.F. (1983) Sensory papilla patterns of the cheek lateralis system in the gobiid fishes Acentrogobius and Glosso-
gobius, and their significance for the classification of gobioid fishes. Records of the Australian Museum, 35,
223–229.
Hoese, D.F. & Allen, G.R. (1990) Descriptions of two new freshwater Glossogobius (Pisces: Gobiidae) from northern
Papua New Guinea. Records of the Western Australian Museum, Supplement, Number 34, 117–129.
Inger, R.F. (1957) Report on a collection of marine fishes form North Borneo. Fieldiana: Zoology, 36(3), 341–405.
Kroon, F.J. & Johnson, J.W. (2006) Range extension for the Mulgrave River Goby (Glossogobius sp.) (Pisces: Gobiidae)
in north Queensland. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum, 52(1), 147–150.
Macleay, W.J. (1883) Contribution to the knowledge of the fishes of New Guinea. No. 4. Proceedings of the Linnean
Society of New South Wales (1)8(2), 252–280.
Nichols, J.T. (1951) Four new gobies from New Guinea. American Museum Novitates, 1539, 1–8.
Peters, W.C.H. (1868) Über die von Hrn. Dr. F. Jagar in dem ostindischen Archipel. gesammelten und dem Königl. zool-
ogischen Museum übergebenen Fische. Monatsberichte der Königllich Preussischen Akademie Wissenschaften Ber-
lin, 1868, 254–281.
Ramsay, E.P. & Ogilby, J.D. (1886) A contribution to the knowledge of the fish fauna of New Guinea. Proceedings of the
Linnean Society of New South Wales, (2)1(1), 8–20.
Richardson, J. (1845) Ichthyology. Part 3. pp. 87–150, in Hinds, R.B. (ed.) The Zoology of the Voyage of H.M.S. Sulphur
under the command of Captain Sir Edward Belcher, during the years 1836-42. Smith, Elder & Co., London.
Roberts, T.R. (1978) An ichthyological survey of the Fly River in Papua New Guinea with descriptions of new species.
Smithsonian Contributions in Zoology, 281, 1–72.
Sauvage, H.E. (1880) Description des gobioides nouveaux ou peu connus de la collection du Museum d'Histoire
Naturelle. Bulletin Société Philomathique de Paris, (7)4, 40–58.
Smith, H.M. & Seale, A. (1906) Notes on a collection of fishes from the island of Mindanao, Philippine Archipelago,
with descriptions of new genera and species. Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 29, 73–82.
Smith, J.L.B. (1937) New records of South African fishes. Annals of the Natal Museum, 8, 167–197.
Temminck, C.J. & Schlegel, H. (1845) in Siebold, P. Fr. de (ed.) Fauna Japonica, Apud Arnz and Socios, Leyden, 4(8),
133–152.
Valenciennes, A. in Cuvier, G.L & Valenciennes, A. (1837) Histoire Naturelle des Poissons. Vol. 12. Levrault, Paris, 507
pp.
Weber, M. (1894) Die Süsswasser-Fische des Indeschen Archipels, nebst Bemerkungen über den Ursprung der Fauna
von Celebes. pp. 405–476 in, Zoologische Ergebnisse einer Reise in niederländisch Ost-Indien, 3(2), 269–476.
Weber, M. (1913) Neue Beiträge zur Kenntnis der Süsswasserfische von Celebes. Bijdragen tot de Dierkunde, 1913,
197–213.
Whitley, G.P. (1959) Ichthyological snippets. Australian Zoologist, 12(4), 310–323.
... The COI sequence was reported to be informative in analyzing genetic diversity in fish, including Australian fish species [20], medicinal fish of Culter (Pisces: Cyprinidae) [34], pufferfish species [35], transparent gobies [36], and Sillaginidae fishes (Perciformes) [37]. Within the scope of this study, three Glossogobius species exhibited a lot of similar outside traits as mentioned by Hoese and Allen [38], G. giuris, G. aureus and G. sparsipapillus had a cylindrical body, with two distinct dorsal fins and fused pelvic fins. Some other features were notable, such as largemouth (10-15% SL), depressed head, long and pointed snout l, projecting lower jaw, at least six lines of longitudinal papilla running longitudinally on the cheek, 27-30 vertebrae, a bilobed tongue, gill opening reaching below a point just before to just behind posterior preopercular margin. ...
... The fact that G. sparsipapillus was identical to G. giuris or G. aureus could be due to two main reasons; one was that the COI gene sequence of G. sparsipapillus was not available in the gene bank; and the second was that COI gene sequence of G. sparsipapillus still had many overlapping nucleotides at different peaks. Glossogobius aureus had the same characteristic documented by Hoese and Allen [38] such as the blackish spots on the 2nd dorsal fin and in the caudal peduncle, as well as the longitudinal black lines on the side of the body which are usually blurred as reported by Phuong and Binh [29]. The phylogram showed that the three species of the Glossogobius genus were interspersed in small clades. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background The Vietnamese Mekong Delta (VMD) is the granary for the whole country, providing animal and plant resources, especially fish. Among the fish species, the genus Glossogobius are the majority. Until now, research for this species has been solely relied on fish morphology for identification. Hence, the present study aimed to describe the morphological variations of the morphologically identified gobies and to validate them at the molecular level through the sequencing of the barcode region, the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (COI) gene to preliminary provide fundamental information for conservation. Results The mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I genes were amplified successfully with an approximate size of 650-680 bp. Their morphometries were quite different, and the genetic distance (p-value) among groups and within groups ranged from 0.00 to 0.12. The similarity of the COI gene sequences between the analyzed samples and in the NCBI database was from 87.01 to 100%. The specimens of G. aureus, G. giuris and G. sparsipapillus were interspersed in small branches of the phylogenetic tree with a low genetic distance highlighting that the genetic diversity of COI gene was low among species. Therefore, it is recommended that a combination of morphological method and mtCOI DNA barcoding is required for accurate classification. Conclusion This study helps determine three distinct lineages of Glossogobius species, so an appropriate strategy can be proposed for exploitation and conservation.
... Table 2 Compilation of vertebral counts in the lineages of the Gobiidae according to literature data Genera were sorted into lineages following Agorreta et al. (2013) and Thacker (2015). Vertebral counts were mainly compiled from Birdsong et al. (1988) and Miller (1986Miller ( , 2004; additional counts were taken from Ahnelt (2003) [for Anatirostrum, Benthophilus], Ahnelt and Duchkowitsch (2004) [Proterorhinus], Shibukawa and Iwata (2007) [Grallenia], Kovačić and Schliewen (2008) [Gorogobius], and Hoese and Allen (2009) [Glossogobius]. ...
... We continued the search for the 'best fit' by considering which members of the Glossogobius, Gobius and Aphia lineages share with the newly described fossils a similarly large number of soft rays in the D2 (14-16) and the anal fin (13-15). On this basis, it is unlikely that the fossils are related to the Glossogobius lineage, because each of the four genera included in it (after Thacker 2015) has distinctively fewer soft rays in both the D2 and anal fin: In Bathygobius there are nine (D2) and eight (anal fin) (Miller and Stefanni 2001;Tornabene et al. 2010); in Glossogobius 11 (D2) and up to nine (anal fin) (Hoese and Allen 2009;Hoese et al. 2015); in Grallenia the maxima are 10 (D2) and nine (anal fin) (Shibukawa and Iwata 2007), and in Psammogobius the numbers are up to 10 (D2) and up to 11 (anal fin) (Maugé 1986;Froese and Pauly 2021). A similar result is obtained for the genera of the Gobius lineage that share the vertebral count of 10 + 17 with the fossils. ...
Article
Full-text available
This article is part I of our study on a highly diverse assemblage of goby species from the lower Volhynian (lower Sarmatian sensu lato) deposits of northern Moldova (Karpov Yar, Naslavcea, western sector of the Eastern Paratethys). Six species, including five new ones, representing four new genera are described. All share the following unique features: large numbers of rays in the second dorsal fin (14–16) and anal fin (13–15) and, where preserved, a caudal fin of longish to lanceolate shape. They resemble the present-day European genus Lesueurigobius Whitley, 1950, but, based on their otoliths preserved in situ, they cannot belong to this genus. The new fossils most likely represent a stem lineage of the European Aphia lineage, and indicate that the diversity of gobiid lineages 12 million years ago differed clearly from that observed today.
... Species of Glossogobius can be found across the Indo-Pacific in a diversity of stream, river, wetland and lake environments, sometimes extending into estuaries. They can comprise a significant portion of local species richness, with some 37 valid species recognised (Eschmeyer & Fong, 2019) but are likely to eventually number more than 50 species (Hoese & Allen, 2009). The dwarf, more-colourful species are well suited to aquaria, with others known in traditional culture and language (e.g., Allen et al., 2008;Shelley et al., 2018a), and several larger species are important components of subsistence and market fisheries, especially in India and Bangladesh (Islam, 2004;Rao & Rao, 2002). ...
... Allozyme analyses followed the principles of an overview study focusing primarily on species boundaries, and thus incorporating a large number of loci; small sample sizes per locality; and numerous localities spread across the geographic range (as recommended by Richardson et al., 1986). Larger sample sizes were included for ecological monitoring sites on the Daly River, with an outgroup chosen from Papua New Guinea (Glossogobius robertsi Hoese & Allen, 2009). Some 79 fish were successfully screened from 51 sites (Table 1; Table S1), and no a priori identification was assumed to provide an independent test of field identification. ...
Article
Flathead gobies (genus Glossogobius) include around 40 small to medium sized benthic fishes found primarily in freshwater habitats across the Indo‐Pacific, having biodiversity value as well as cultural and economic value as food fishes, especially in developing countries. To help resolve considerable confusion regarding the identification of some of the larger growing Glossogobius, species a systematic framework was established using nuclear genetic markers, mitochondrial DNA barcoding, and phenotypic evidence for a geographically‐widespread collection of individuals from the waterways of tropical northern Australia. Species boundaries and distribution patterns were discordant with those previously reported, most notably for the Tank Goby Glossogobius giuris, which included a cryptic species. Genetic divergence was matched with accompanying unique visual characters that aid field identification. Additional taxonomic complexity was also evident, by comparison with DNA barcodes from international locations, suggesting the specific names applicable for two of the candidate species in Australia remain unresolved due to confusion surrounding type specimens. Although flathead gobies are assumed to be widespread and common, this study demonstrates that unrealised taxonomic and ecological complexity is evident, and this will influence assessments of tropical biodiversity and species conservation. This study supports the need for taxonomic studies of freshwater fishes to underpin management in areas subject to significant environmental change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
... Indeed, Gobies were used as a biomarker of water quality owing to its various population throughout the country which includes 16 species known to locate only in the Philippines (Hoese and Allen, 2009;Lekshmi et al., 2010). Along with, G. celebius has been employed as an indicator to detect developmental stability and evaluate environmental stress (Kark et al., 2001;Mpho et al., 2002;Velickovic 2004 Relatively, the PCA implied deformation for both male and female samples were shown in (Fig. 4 & 5). ...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological variations among organism have been baseline information to which species may vary from one and another. This study has been conducted to determine the intraspecific evaluation in the morphology of Glossogobius guiris using geometric morphometric analysis from Lake Mainit, Agusan del Norte, Phils. About 60 individuals (30 males and 30 females) were collected and subjected to analysis. Digital imaging was prepared and loaded to the tpdsdig2 program. Standard landmarks were applied in the fish morphology. Utilizing thin plate spline (tps) series, landmark examination were obtained and subjected to symmetry and asymmetry geometric data (SAGE) software. There were three factors applied to identify shape variations: individuals, sides and individuals vs. sides. In Procrustes ANOVA, results showed a highly significant difference of (P<0.0001**) in both male and female samples demonstrating FA in G. guiris. The asymmetry detected in the fish samples indicating a variation in the morphology among the female and male samples. While other correlate this phenomenon due to genetic composition and environmental perturbations. Principal Component Analysis was applied to investigate affected landmarks in the fishes and showed that females have the highest cumulative scores (82.9304%) while males (78.9154%). The data obtained revealed that morphological variations have been depicted between female and male samples yet they are in the same species. Thus, employing geometric morphometric to determined shape variances widely acknowledges and performs as a cost-effective tool.
... Comparative material is listed in Hoese and Allen (1990, 2009, 2012. in addition, paratypes of an extralimital dwarf species, Glossogobius minutus, UsnM 232954, 6(2945), from the southwest coast of india were examined. ...
Article
The current paper describes three, highly distinctive, new species of Glossogobius from southern New Guinea and northern Australia. The species differ from other species of Glossogobius in the combination of small size (maximum size to 50 mm SL), strong sexual dimorphism in mouth and fin sizes and reductions of nape scales and head pores in two of the species. The new taxa are known from small rivers and streams at elevations of less than 100 m.
Article
Full-text available
Lake Lanao, the second largest lake in the Philippines and one of the 15 ancient lakes in the world, used to contain 20 endemic cyprinid species, which had attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists in the past. Over the years, there has been a steady decline in the abundance and diversity of endemic fishes in the lake because of overfishing and introduction of non-native species. This study represents the first molecular survey of the ichthyofauna of Lake Lanao. A total of 75 specimens of 12 different species belonging to nine genera, eight families, and five orders were DNA barcoded using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene. Average Kimura 2-parameter genetic distances were 0.24% (within species), 8.31% (between species), 9.69% (within family), and 24.86% (between families). Possible hybrids between Oreochromis species were detected. Glossogobius spp. was highlighted for further taxonomic investigation because barcoding indicated unidentified species of this genus. The partial sequence of mitochondrial COI gene was found to be a good DNA barcode for fast and accurate species identification of fishes in Lake Lanao and for tagging species that warrant further taxonomic investigation.
Article
Full-text available
Northern Australia is biologically diverse and of national and global conservation signicance. Its ancient landscape contains the world’s largest area of savannah ecosystem in good ecological condition and its rivers are largely free-flowing. Agriculture, previously confined largely to open range-land grazing, is set to expand in extent and to focus much more on irrigated cropping and horticulture. Demands on the water resources of the region are thus, inevitably increasing. Reliable information is required to guide and inform development and help plan for a sustainable future for the region which includes healthy rivers that contain diverse fish assemblages. Based on a range of information sources, including the outcomes of recent and extensive new field surveys, this study maps the distribution of the 111 freshwater fishes (excluding elasmobranches) and 42 estuarine vagrants recorded from freshwater habitats of the region. We classify the habitat use and migratory biology of each species. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the diversity and distribution of fishes of the region within a standardised nomenclatural framework. In addition, we summarise the outcomes of recent phylogeographic and phylogenetic research using molecular technologies to identify where issues of taxonomy may need further scrutiny. The study provides an informed basis for further research on the spatial arrangement of biodiversity and its relationship to environmental factors (e.g. hydrology), conservation planning and phylogentic variation within individual taxa.
Article
Full-text available
The body characters of Glossogobius giuris were correlated with total length (LT) whereas eye length (LE), snout length (LSN) and gape of mouth (MG) were correlated with head length (LH) at 1% level (p<0.01). Few differences were observed in meristic traits. LT-WB relationship was found as Ln WB = - 4.493 + 2.887 Ln LT (male, r = 0.976) and Ln WB = - 5.327 + 3.291 Ln LT (female, r = 0.999). The value of „b‟ was 2.887 for male and 3.291 for female. The value of FR was 1.028±0.21 for male and 1.004±0.28 for female. In growth trail, silver carp flesh (T2) showed the highest (10.46±0.06) growth performance while perch feed (T3) showed the lowest (2.63±0.05 g) in terms of weight gain. The highest IG value (6.09±0.83) was observed on 15 April and the lowest (0.85±0.91) on 15 January. Mean fecundity varied from 3,339.89±261.53 to 15,012±4862.41. Preliminary success achieved in the breeding of G. giuris using PG extract at the rate of 20 mg (T1), 40 mg (T2) and 50 mg (T3) PG kg-1WB for female and 20 mg PG kg-1WB for male. The highest ovulation (83.33±28.86%) and fertilization rate (98.67±2.31%) observed at the dose of 40 mg PG kg-1WB in April which was significantly higher than that of 50 mg PG kg-1WB (p<0.05). A dose of 20 mg PG kg-1WB was not sufficient to ovulate the broodfish. Hatchling (45.00±5.29%) was observed only at the middle dose of 40 mg PG kg-1WB.
Article
Full-text available
This study was led in determining the health of area in Agusan River, Butuan City, Agusan Del Norte by looking into the level of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) in populations of Glossogobius giuris. Numerous studies have shown that obtaining the FA can be used to evaluate the water quality including the health of the ecosystem. In this study, G. giuris was used due to its abundance in the area. Thinplate spline (TPS) series was used for landmark analyses of each sample and were subjected to Symmetry and Asymmetry in Geometric Data (SAGE) software. Results of the Procrustes ANOVA showed that individual symmetry of L-R sides presented were not significant. However, variations in both sides of the sexes were identified to be highly significant (p < 0.0001). The results of Principal Component (PC) scores present a high percentage FA of female (71.33%) and male (93.3611%), respectively. In females, all landmark points were affected in PC 1 (47.06%) and PC2 (17.32). In males, PC 1 (60.8437%) and PC 2 (18.913%) have all landmark points affected except for PC 2, where posterior end of the nuchal spine, ventral end of lower jaw articulation, posterior end of maxilla, anterior and posterior midline of orbit, dorsal end of operculum and dorsal base of pectoral fin were not affected. This study validates the use of FA in assessing the status of the ecological health of Agusan River.
Article
New distributional records for the Mulgrave River Goby, Glossogobius sp. 4 (sensu Allen et al., 2002) are presented for Saltwater Creek, a coastal catchment in the northern Wet Tropics. The species has previously been recorded from the Russell/Mulgrave basin, and from Hills Creek and Falls Creek, two short streams flowing into the eastern side of Trinity Inlet. Our records increase the known range of this species northward by 70km. The distribution appears disjunct as there are no records of this species in rivers surveyed between Trinity Inlet and Saltwater Creek. Its apparent very restricted distribution has led to conservation listing of this species as: 'Lower Risk - Near Threatened', 'Restricted', or Rare'. Our new records indicate a detailed survey of coastal drainages is needed to better understand the distribution and conservation needs of this species.