Article

The Consequences of divorce on individual, family and society

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Abstract

Divorce is an effect of several complicated psychosocial causes. It is an obvious reason for the underlying conflicts, lacking the balance and harmony of a relationship, which lead couples through a decision making process to end up their marriage. In all cultures, divorce has not been welcome. Reviewing statistics and studies on its causes that strived to find solutions for its reduction, indicates the significance of divorce and the traces of its negative effects left on various aspects of the human society. Divorce, either directly or indirectly, affects the mental health of couples, children, relatives and friends. The lack of comprehensive and inclusive studies on this issue urged us to set the aim of this study to identify the consequences of divorce.

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... for remedying some of the negative consequences of divorce. For example, after divorce, people often experience mental health problems (Öngider, 2011;Ghaffarzadeh & Nazari, 2012), have more physical health problems (Joung et al., 1997), experience greater social isolation (Peters & Liefbroer, 1997), have a lower standard of living, and are less wealthy (Ross, 1995;Zagorsky, 2005). ...
... Finally, it was shown that divorce impacts more than the individuals who choose to end their marriage, which takes a toll on society [42]. Divorce has a far-reaching impact on families' financial livelihoods, children, and the workplace. ...
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