Article

Behavioural and neuroprotective effect of fish oil on MPTP induced Parkinson's disease in mice

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Abstract

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc that provide innervations in the striatum. The present work was focused on the neuroprotective effect of fish oil (Omega-3 fatty acids) against experimentally (1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetrahydropyridine) induced Parkinson's disease in mice, by analyzing the behavioural studies. Rota rod test, Hang test, measurement of fore paw stride length during walking test and Photo-actometer tests proved that 5% and 10% fish oil in mice improved the performance against MPTP administration and the results were significant (p<0.05). Compared to the control group 5% fish oil treated group shows improved behavioural activity - Rota rod test 71%; Hang test 70%, measurement of fore paw stride length during walking test 34% and Photo-actometer tests 14%. The 10% fish oil treated group shows Rota rod test 86%; Hang test 87%, measurement of fore paw stride length during walking test 64% and Photo-actometer tests 18.45%. The study evidence that fish oil is a neuroprotective against MPTP induced in mice.

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