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Executive Mind, Timely Action

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... Rather, they require a fresh and extraordinarily alert attention to oneself and the environment in the moment of practice. 10 They require the analogical ability to move back and forth between abstract thought about ethical and political ideals and concrete instances of managerial practice as these occur. And they require the flexibility of behavior of an accomplished actor, so that one's speech and nonverbal actions simultaneously convey three things: ...
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