Article

Effect of defatted soy flour on the quality of buns

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Abstract

High protein buns were prepared by replacing wheat flour with 5, 10 and 15% defatted soy flour (DSF). The farinograph water absorption of dough increased from 60.4 to 67.2% and dough development time from 2.0 to 5.5 min with increasing addition of soy flour. The mixograph area decreased from 75.9 to 71.0 cm2, the extensograph resistance to extension, extensibility and area values decreased gradually from 990 to 780 BU, 138 to 115 mm, 182.8 to 136.0 cm2, respectively, indicating adverse effect on the dough properties. Though the specific volume of buns decreased from 3.80 to 3.61 ml/g with 15% addition of soy flour, the firmness of crumb decreased from 5.50 to 3.64 N, indicating improvement in softness. The protein contents of buns increased from 11.01 to 18.89%. Addition of sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (SSL) or soy lecithin (SL) improved the quality of buns, containing soy flour.

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... g of water per every 0.5 g of protein added to the samples, while the addition of GSP promotes slightly larger WA increments (0.75±0.3 g). Similar results have been reported with the use of whole soybean flour or germinated soybean flour (Rosales-Juárez et Hallén et al. 2004; Senthil et al. 2002 and Indrani et al. 1997). The increment on WA values obtained from GSP samples as compared to nongerminated and control samples may be the result of the release of hydrophilic components due to the germination process. ...
... reported with the use of whole soybean flour or germinated soybean flour (Rosales-Juárez et Hallén et al. 2004; Senthil et al. 2002 and Indrani et al. 1997). The increment on WA values obtained from GSP samples as compared to nongerminated and control samples may be the result of the release of hydrophilic components due to the germination process. Indrani et al. (1997) and Doxastakis et al. (2002) reported an increment in water absorption from 60.4% to 67.2% and from 56.7% to 57.9%, for wheat flour added with 5% to 15% of defatted soy flour, respectively.Table 1 also presents the results of dough MCT and dough S, when adding different concentrations of WSP and GSP to wheat flour and to full-bread formulat ...
... with GSP showed smaller values than the ones prepared with WSP. Juárez et al. (2008) reported that doughs with added whole soybean flours promoted an increase in R max as their concentration was increased; however, their results with germinated soybean flour showed a decrement in this parameter as result of the addition of germinated soybean flour. Indrani et al. (1997) reported that the extensograph resistance to extension decreased when replacing wheat flour with 5%, 10%, and 15% defatted soy flour. This decrement in R max could also be explained considering the decrement of the size of proteins (Maforimbo et al. 2006) as result of the germination process. Extensibility (Table 2) did not significantl ...
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