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Intelligence, emotional and spiritual quotient as elements of effective leadership

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Abstract

The key elements of effective leadership are intelligence, emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence. The present paper traces the early conceptualization of intelligence as an analytical ability to effective leadership and the current proposal of models of leader's mind that combines traditional analytical ability with emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence. There are a number of psychological theories and research which have tried to apply a combination of intelligence, emotional intelligence and spiritual intelligence to successful leadership. While going through the various research, it was found that integration of IQ, EQ, and SQ allows leaders to thrive on uncertainty, deals creatively with rapid change, and realizes the full potential of those who lead or work with them. The results suggest that we think with our intelligence, along with our emotions, as well as our bodies (EQ) and spirits, our values, our hopes, our unifying sense of meaning and values (SQ). Spiritual intelligence is about having a direction in life, and being able to heal ourselves of all the resentments. It is thinking of us as an expression of a higher reality.

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... The IQ for assessing human intelligence is commonly accepted as a ratio of rational and logical knowledge [1] that allow leaders to gain success. However, many employees who want to be leaders are eventually eliminated, despite their high logical intelligence [1]; and highly intelligent leaders are not necessarily more effective [2]. As a result of the further search for what makes a leader effective, attention was paid to emotional intelligence (EI), that was an important challenge for future leaders [3]. ...
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