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Information Literacy Landscapes: Information Literacy in Education, Workplace and Everyday Contexts

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Abstract

Drawing upon the authoras on going research into information literacy, Information Literacy Landscapes explores the nature of the phenomenon from a socio-cultural perspective, which offers a more holistic approach to understanding information literacy as a catalyst for learning. This perspective emphasizes the dynamic relationship between learner and environment in the construction of knowledge. The approach underlines the importance of contextuality, through which social, cultural and embodied factors influence formal and informal learning. This book contributes to the understanding of information literacy and its role in formal and informal contexts.

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... Information literacy relates to the ability to think critically and refers to individual skills in information handling that support learning [26,27]. In workplace context, information literacy translates to 'knowing when and how to use information in order to help adhere organisational aims and add value to organisational activities' [26] and has increasingly been recognised as a professional key competence [27][28][29]. ...
... Information literacy relates to the ability to think critically and refers to individual skills in information handling that support learning [26,27]. In workplace context, information literacy translates to 'knowing when and how to use information in order to help adhere organisational aims and add value to organisational activities' [26] and has increasingly been recognised as a professional key competence [27][28][29]. Information literacy develops through socio-cultural practice within which knowledge and meaning are built through dialogue and debate [27,28,[30][31][32]. However, the concept of information literacy mainly focuses on individuals' information and knowledge handling skills, how they are developed and constructed, and how they support the individual in completing work tasks and reaching individual and common goals. ...
... In workplace context, information literacy translates to 'knowing when and how to use information in order to help adhere organisational aims and add value to organisational activities' [26] and has increasingly been recognised as a professional key competence [27][28][29]. Information literacy develops through socio-cultural practice within which knowledge and meaning are built through dialogue and debate [27,28,[30][31][32]. However, the concept of information literacy mainly focuses on individuals' information and knowledge handling skills, how they are developed and constructed, and how they support the individual in completing work tasks and reaching individual and common goals. ...
Article
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Human resources and intellectual capital are best utilised through an ongoing interaction between individual and social processes. Still there is a research gap of empirical multilevel studies, focusing both on individual and organisational aspects of knowledge processes. To fill this gap, this article reports on a quantitative study, where the relationship between information literacy and social capital, representing the individual and social contexts affecting organisational knowledge processes, is explored. Structural equation modelling-based analysis of 378 employees working in different companies in Finland demonstrated that information literacy supports all three dimensions of social capital at workplace. Strong information handling skills enable better access to knowledge beyond the resources of an individual, that is, social capital. The results of the study contribute to a better understanding of how to manage human resources and the information and knowledge processes that employees are expected to be involved in.
... Notably, measures for studying the impact of IL for workplace efficiency and effectiveness are lacking (Williams et al., 2014;Forster, 2017). It has been stated that IL in workplace contexts must be viewed from a more holistic perspective, as sets of skills that help people to work collectively, and with an understanding of workplaces as social constructs (Forster, 2017;Lloyd, 2010;Lloyd, 2017;Tuominen et al., 2005). IL is understood as a socio-cultural practice as much as it is an individual competence (Lipponen, 2010;Lloyd, 2017). ...
... In an everyday life or workplace environment, this is even more complex. While in addition to everyone's own context or personal information landscape, we are part of a larger information landscape of a team or even an organisation (Lloyd, 2010), affecting the ongoing construction of our IL. This leaves a dependence on respondents assessing their own achievements. ...
... Studying IL in workplace context requires a holistic approach, understanding workplaces as social constructs (Forster, 2017;Lloyd, 2010Lloyd, , 2017Tuominen et al., 2005) with a strong social dimension in relation to information sources and interaction (Crawford & Irving, 2009;Bruce et al., 2012). Previous research has foremost applied qualitative approaches, to better understand the complexity of individual and social factors interplaying and affecting WIL. ...
Article
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This paper focuses information literacy (IL) from a methodological perspective, addressing quantitative IL measures, suitable for evaluating the role of IL in supporting work activities. So far, IL in workplace contexts has mostly been studied using qualitative methods, designed for studying situational and context-dependent practices. Therefore it is important to explore how quantitative measures could be used to bring forward the relation between IL and organisational outcomes, that is the assessment of the impact of IL in workplace contexts. Quantitative research into IL is not unknown, but has been mainly developed in higher education, in order to measure students’ abilities to make use of information. This paper brings forward three separate studies, conducted by the authors, highlighting different workplace contexts: small and medium enterprises; universities; and community councils. The common approach is that survey instruments were used to measure IL and its impact in these organisational contexts. The methodological implementations and insights are presented and combined, and methodological strengths and challenges are discussed, with the aims of (1) building knowledge about IL measures in workplace settings that is currently lacking, (2) finding additional measures for the complex IL construct, and (3) considering the scope of the practices that can be measured. The paper highlights the complexity of studying the impacts of IL in workplace contexts, and the importance of using multiple methods. It constitutes an important step towards a more unified understanding of how to study workplace IL.
... In this scheme, the body has in effect become an absent presence (Sauer, 1998;Shilling 2003). It is absent, in the sense that insufficient attention is paid to the body as a site of information that is corporeally produced through people's physical experience of their settings (Lloyd, 2010), through their engagement with others and with the material objects of their workplace performance. ...
... In the workplace, the body is the visible enactment of knowing and situatedness. Consequently disassociating the body from research into people's experience of information literacy effectively limits our understanding of the nature of this experience and has implications for accounts of learning (Lloyd, 2010). The primary aim of this chapter is to bring the body into discussions about information experience and to suggest that the body, in addition to acting as the locus through which social and epistemic information modalities meet, provides its own narrative that informs learning in all contexts. ...
... Information landscapes are described in this chapter as the space that is constructed by people who are co-located and co-participating in a set of ongoing practices. Information landscapes reflect the discourse, social order and arrangements that form a social practice (Lloyd, 2010). The structure of a landscape enables or constrains access to certain types of information. ...
Chapter
Bodies are central to the information experience, but are not often accounted for as a source of information, that is central to the information literacy experience. Based on research with emergency services personnel and with nurses, this chapter explores the role of the body as a locus for understanding and meaning-making. Drawing from a sociocultural perspective, the author suggests that the concept of information experience as a stand-alone conception is meaningless. A solution is to acknowledge the referencing of embodied experience against social conditions and ways of knowing that inform peoples’ experience of practice, as located within the body. Key questions for researchers considering an information experience approach are posed.
... However, several authors concur that IL lacks a theoretical framework. Authors such as Christine Bruce (2000), Troy Swanson (2004), Peter Elmborg (2006), Annemaree Lloyd (2010) and Andrew Whitworth (2014) have highlighted the gap between theory and practice. These authors have considered the following theories and methods for IL: sociocultural practice theory, phenomenography and variation theory, discourse analysis (see Bruce, 2000;Lloyd, 2010; and critical theory based on Paulo Freire's philosophy (see Swanson, 2004;Bruce et al.,2006;Elmborg, 2006;Whitworth, 2014). ...
... Authors such as Christine Bruce (2000), Troy Swanson (2004), Peter Elmborg (2006), Annemaree Lloyd (2010) and Andrew Whitworth (2014) have highlighted the gap between theory and practice. These authors have considered the following theories and methods for IL: sociocultural practice theory, phenomenography and variation theory, discourse analysis (see Bruce, 2000;Lloyd, 2010; and critical theory based on Paulo Freire's philosophy (see Swanson, 2004;Bruce et al.,2006;Elmborg, 2006;Whitworth, 2014). In her work on information landscapes Annemaree Lloyd (2010) argues that information literacy cannot be contained rigidly within the walls of the library as meanings and knowledge constructs are dependent on different socio-cultural experiences. ...
... These authors have considered the following theories and methods for IL: sociocultural practice theory, phenomenography and variation theory, discourse analysis (see Bruce, 2000;Lloyd, 2010; and critical theory based on Paulo Freire's philosophy (see Swanson, 2004;Bruce et al.,2006;Elmborg, 2006;Whitworth, 2014). In her work on information landscapes Annemaree Lloyd (2010) argues that information literacy cannot be contained rigidly within the walls of the library as meanings and knowledge constructs are dependent on different socio-cultural experiences. This greatly expands IL and allows for a holistic application of the skills. ...
Chapter
Learning in most academic institutions has relied on the provision of library resources to both support and supplement what is being taught and researched. This chapter focuses on the research process of students in the digital environment and discusses the challenges they and service providers in the library face in terms of accessing and making available academically relevant information resources. In order to understand these challenges, a consideration of how developments in technology have changed scholarship in the digital environment is important. Further, the evolving role of the information professional is considered in connection with these changes. The deluge of information, both open-access and subscribed, affects the way in which users search for and access information sources. Thus an appreciation of the information-seeking behaviours of researchers is imperative if educators are to provide the relevant support, manage user expectations and ensure the successful provision of an information service in the twenty-first century e-learning environment. The (often younger) tech-savvy, multi-tasking user who is fluent in the use of mobile technologies, conversant with social media and Google, YouTube and Wikipedia, often has different expectations of the academic digital library. These expectations are quite often dashed and users may end up discouraged, as they may not have the appropriate skills to navigate the different search platforms that publishers make available to academic libraries. Users require skills that include knowledge of different types of information resources and an understanding of the most appropriate ways for searching, locating, accessing, and critically evaluating information, as well as using and managing this information. ‘Information literacy’, as these information and literature search skills are referred to, go hand-in-hand with digital literacies, which allow users to make the best use of the technologies employed by information providers such as libraries. These literacies, in turn, form the gamut of academic literacies that ensure that learners leave formal education with the appropriate skills to enable them survive in the work place and to continue their learning throughout life. The chapter also discusses ways in which academics can work collaboratively with support staff within educational institutions and offers practical solutions to improving the student learning experience through collaborative practices.
... In the literature we reviewed, while education advocacy was mainly related to special education (e.g. Rehm et al., 2013;Sebag, 2010;Wright & Taylor, 2014) the literature was also replete with examples of advocacy for IL in educational contexts (Lloyd, 2010;Jackson, 2012;Tewell, 2013). ...
... Kent State University's Information School for example, offers two separate IL courses at the undergraduate level, one for first year students, Information Fluency for College Success, and one for upper level undergraduate students, Information Fluency for the Workplace and Beyond (Kent State University, 2020). IL has largely been a concept that is limited to the LIS field; This study, in concurrence with earlier studies, shows that it is imperative that LIS professionals continue to make the case for the relevance of IL in workplace contexts (Bruce, 1999;Cheuk, 2008, Crawford & Irving, 2009Foster, 2017;Lawler, 2003, Lloyd, 2010 and everyday life contexts (Agosto & Hughes-Hassell, 2006;Martzoukou & Abdi, 2017;Matteson & Gersh, 2019). This study makes a contribution to that argument, that is, that IL skills can indeed be useful in other contexts outside of LIS. ...
Article
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The current research sought to identify what skills, knowledge, and behaviours (SKBs) in advocacy engagement are closely associated with information literacy skills. The paper examines what role information literacy (IL) skills play in making one an effective advocate by drawing on everyday life situations that involve advocacy such as self-advocacy, social advocacy, patient advocacy, parent advocacy, and policy advocacy. A rapid scoping review was completed using articles published within the last ten years (2008–2019). The articles were retrieved from Academic Search Complete, a multidisciplinary database. The aim of our initial review was to identify what skills, knowledge and behaviours are deemed essential for everyday life situations that involve advocacy. Charting of the literature was then used to map the skills, knowledge and behaviours mentioned in relation to advocacy to information literacy skills. Results showed how the knowledge component in advocacy engagement is closely associated with various IL skills such as finding information, evaluation of information and sharing information. Implications of the study point towards the importance of emphasising IL instruction in broader contexts beyond higher education and/ or academic libraries. The study shows that IL skills are important in the public realm and in primary (elementary) and secondary (high) school contexts as well. Therefore, public librarians and school librarians should be just as engaged in equipping their patrons/clientele with IL skills that may be needed for different types of advocacy such as self-advocacy, parent advocacy and patient advocacy. The study also has implications for humanitarian research and research that involves situations of information poverty as these contexts will often involve advocacy work as well.
... O analytický pohľad na informačnú gramotnosť prostredníctvom pojmov gramotnosti a informácie s dôrazom na previazanosť s informačným správaním sa pokúsili Mark Hepworth a Geoff Walton (2009), Annemaree Lloydová (Lloyd 2010) či Teresa Welshová s Melissou Wrightovou (Welsh a Wright 2010). ...
... Štrukturálny rámec informačnej gramotnosti je vybudovaný na princípoch psychológie osobnosti, čím ho môžeme zovšeobecniť na rámec akejkoľvek gramotnosti v jej širšom poňatí, zahŕňajúci súbor vedomostí, schopností, zručností, motivácie, preferencií, hodnôt, postojov a celkových osvojených metód a techník práce, ktoré sa dajú formovať u jednotlivca(Hrdináková 2011). 4 Metaforu krajiny informačnej gramotnosti používa napríklad aj Annemaree Lloydová(Lloyd 2006;Lloyd 2010). ...
Book
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FÁZIK, Jakub. Informačná gramotnosť Generácie Z: Rozbor problematiky a výsledky fenomenografického výskumu začínajúcich študentov učiteľských programov Univerzity Komenského v Bratislave [online]. Bratislava: Slovenská pedagogická knižnica, 2020. ISBN 978-80-972668-6-8. Dostupné na: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4055198
... Future research should also examine the role that apps can play in extending the scope of information research. The ability to record audio as well as photographs and texts, for example, means that the use of apps such as EthOS and PixStori could build upon the recent focus on the body within LIS research (Lloyd, 2010) to explore sensory aspects of information activities in more detail, including working with voice audio as research data in itself rather than merely as "a precursor to transcription" (Gallagher, 2019, p. 1). Sound has not often formed the focus of LIS research, which has tended to emphasize text-based formats of information (Lloyd, 2010). ...
... The ability to record audio as well as photographs and texts, for example, means that the use of apps such as EthOS and PixStori could build upon the recent focus on the body within LIS research (Lloyd, 2010) to explore sensory aspects of information activities in more detail, including working with voice audio as research data in itself rather than merely as "a precursor to transcription" (Gallagher, 2019, p. 1). Sound has not often formed the focus of LIS research, which has tended to emphasize text-based formats of information (Lloyd, 2010). However, as automated voices become employed as coercive forces within urban settings (Power, 2014) and the use of voice-controlled assistants such as Alexa continues to rise (Pew Research Center, 2017), it is clear that sound as well as speech play an important role within everyday information interactions. ...
Article
The incorporation of participant-generated photography in research can be a powerful means of studying participants' perspectives and experiences. Approaches such as photovoice and photo-elicitation that incorporate participant-generated photography are increasingly being used in library and information science to study topics such as information needs, information seeking, and use of library space. This article describes two recent studies that used mobile apps (PixStori and EthOS) to facilitate participant-generated photography and photo-elicitation processes in research exploring the information practices of children and young adults, including the affordances, challenges and practical considerations identified by the researchers. Affordances of these apps within a research context include recordability, immediacy, portability, visibility, and durability. Challenges and practical considerations in using these apps in research settings include data security and storage, device failures, app failures, user instruction, cost, and ethical considerations. Implications for future research in library and information science are also explored.
... However, the pedagogical structures and didactic approaches needed to develop these competencies in learners are not yet fully understood or addressed in HE. The work of Lloyd (2010Lloyd ( , 2012 emphasises that instilling DIL skills in ways that support students' academic studies will not necessarily be transferable beyond the university. Workplace and civic information landscapes and the informational problems to which they give rise are structured in different ways (Lloyd 2010;Bruce 2008). ...
... The work of Lloyd (2010Lloyd ( , 2012 emphasises that instilling DIL skills in ways that support students' academic studies will not necessarily be transferable beyond the university. Workplace and civic information landscapes and the informational problems to which they give rise are structured in different ways (Lloyd 2010;Bruce 2008). In HE, learning outcomes are more stable and regulated, more individual, and more structured. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The digitisation of society produces a need to foster new skills and competencies in learners. But where digital and information literacy competencies are addressed in higher education (HE), this is typically in ways that orient the learner to practices expected in the academic setting, or what Lloyd (2010) calls the “epistemic modality”. However, to become expert users of digital information outside HE, learners must also be introduced to social and corporeal (practice-based) modalities. This requires learners to gain experience with selecting tools and configuring their landscape, or what Wenger et al. (2009) call stewarding. This paper reports on research conducted on a number of small groups of learners as they worked in an innovative assessment environment that developed their stewarding capacity. Through content analysis of online discussions, students can be seen employing discursive mapping techniques as they learn to configure their landscapes. This paper has implications for assessment design for digital skills as outlined in the EU’s Digital Competency Framework.
... Most of these studies have focused on IL in academia (Candy, 1998;Rader, 2002). However, comparatively few studies have been appeared focusing on WIL (Bruce, 2000;Candy, 1998;Kirton and Barham, 2005;Lloyd, 2010;Lloyd and Williamson, 2008;Naveed, 2022;Naveed and Rafique, 2018;Oman, 2001;Wang et al., 2011;Weiner, 2011). Despite the increased number of studies on WIL using a variety of professionals, there is a need for more investigations to inform policy and practice. ...
... Despite the importance of IL in the context of the workplace, the existing literature still lacked specific measures for the assessment of WIL (Forster, 2017;Widén et al., 2021;Williams et al., 2014). The workplace information environment is complex and dynamic than academia requiring it to be viewed in a more holistic perspective as people work collectively and collaboratively and should also be understood as a socio-cultural practice (Forster, 2017;Lloyd, 2010Lloyd, , 2017. People as a source for information is an important social dimension which is needed to be considered in the workplace context as knowledge is built based on negotiation and debate (Bruce, 1999;Crawford and Irving, 2009;Kirton and Barham, 2005;Tuominen et al., 2005). ...
Article
This study investigated the current state of information literacy (IL) skills among lawyers practicing at the District Bar Association of Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan. A cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire was conducted to collect data from 297 lawyers. The questionnaire comprised 20 statements related to information literacy along with certain demographic variables. Each lawyer was personally visited in the assigned chamber by one of the researchers to record responses. Both descriptive (frequencies, percentages, mean scores, standard deviations) and inferential statistics (Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test, and one-way analysis of variance) were applied for data analysis in SPSS. The results showed that a large majority of lawyers participating in the survey never received any formal training concerning information literacy. However, most of these lawyers perceived IL skills as important in the context of their workplace especially in conducting legal research. These lawyers were more competent in the basic IL skills and less competent in advanced IL skills. In addition, the lawyers’ age, practical experience, practicing levels, computer proficiency, and English Language proficiency predicted their levels of IL skills. There was a critical need for the development of IL instruction programs for not only practicing lawyers but also for law students to improve their skills since these lawyers felt less competent with advanced levels of IL skills. It is hoped that the present study contributes to the existing body of WIL literature focusing especially on the role of IL in the context of legal work and outlining the current state of lawyers’ IL skills in Pakistan as no such study has appeared so far.
... In any constructivist view, information literacy is more than the ability to engage successfully with codified forms of knowledge; it also facilitates knowing of an information landscape (Lloyd, 2006). Information landscapes are communicative spaces, created by people who co-participate in a field of practice (Lloyd, 2010). They are the "context" in which information is described (Whitworth, 2014). ...
... In a community of practice, we learn not only the rules for the performing of an actual practice, but also acquire information required to determine which practices and knowledge that are deemed legitimate. This tacit information is coded and determined by the community, reflecting its history, assumptions, beliefs, values, and rules (Lloyd, 2010). Over the course of learning, we interact with culturally constructed tools of practice, such as objects, signs, symbols, language, and technologies; accordingly, the sociocultural theory focuses on tool-based IL practices and does this within the context of learning communities. ...
Article
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Purpose/Thesis: This paper identifies the most important theoretical issues and frameworks that may serve as a basis for models of teaching information literacy. Approach/Methods: The paper reviews relevant subject literature published between 1990s and the present to outline the disciplinary context of information literacy in order to identify concepts that might be used to model teaching of information literacy. Results and conclusions: In the light of convergences and overlaps between different literacies, this paper considers various pedagogic approaches – phenomenographic, sociocultural, and discourse analytical, to combine them with the cognitive approach to information literacy. The literature review shows that all these approaches might contribute to a theoretical foundation of information literacy across different age groups and on different levels of education. Originality/Value: Teaching information literacy is examined from a cross-disciplinary perspective with a focus on information science and pedagogy.
... Thus, information literacy (IL) is becoming an increasingly urgent need for all of us, in all walks of life, as citizens of today's information society (Goldstein, 2020). From a sociocultural perspective, it should be noted that IL develops in social contexts and is specific to particular communities (Grafstein, 2002;Lloyd, 2005aLloyd, , 2010Harris, 2008;Talja;Lloyd, 2010;Sales;Pinto, 2017). Also, it is still very necessary to remark that "a gradual but ultimately complete integration of information literacy instruction into the general education curriculum" should be desirable (Owusu-Ansah, Anales de Documentación, 2022, vol. ...
... Thus, information literacy (IL) is becoming an increasingly urgent need for all of us, in all walks of life, as citizens of today's information society (Goldstein, 2020). From a sociocultural perspective, it should be noted that IL develops in social contexts and is specific to particular communities (Grafstein, 2002;Lloyd, 2005aLloyd, , 2010Harris, 2008;Talja;Lloyd, 2010;Sales;Pinto, 2017). Also, it is still very necessary to remark that "a gradual but ultimately complete integration of information literacy instruction into the general education curriculum" should be desirable (Owusu-Ansah, Anales de Documentación, 2022, vol. ...
Article
Full-text available
Information competence is an essential component of translation competence and the basis for the lifelong learning of Translation and Interpreting trainees. This work describes the author’s updated approach to an information literacy course for Translation and Interpreting undergraduate students implemented at the Universitat Jaume I (Spain), which, due to the health situation generated by the COVID-19 pandemic, had to be taught entirely online. The article gives an account of how metaliteracy has been integrated as a guiding thread to encourage reflection and critical thinking throughout the course and awareness of its importance. The students’ feedback and the assessment results demonstrate that learning has been significant. Hopefully, the perspective, curricular proposal and experience analyzed here could be transferable to other discipline-based information literacy training programs.
... Information literacy differs in workplace and academic settings because the information behaviour of workers are different from that of students (Kirton and Barham, 2005;Lloyd, 2010;O'Farrill, 2010). In academia, students usually need to complete assignments, projects, Workers usually adopt multiple approaches in looking for and using information that go beyond the mastery of information seeking that students apply to learn how to think, see, and craft narratives (Hepworth and Smith, 2008;Johnson et al., 2010). ...
... A large majority of these studies focused primarily on academic libraries (Candy, 1998;Rader, 2002) and public libraries (Marcum, 2002). However, there is comparatively little research published on special libraries and information literacy in the workplace environments (Bruce 2000;Candy 1998; Kirton and Barham 2005;Lloyd 2010;Lloyd and Williamson 2008;Oman 2001;Wang, Bruce, and Hughes 2011;Weiner 2011). ...
Article
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Introduction. This study reports the results of a cross-sectional survey conducted to assess the information literacy self-efficacy of scientists working at the Pakistan Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lahore, Pakistan. Method. Survey method using a questionnaire was employed for data collection. The questionnaire containing information literacy self-efficacy scale and some demographic variables was personally administered to all the scientists at the Lahore labs complex of the Council. The response rate was 86.42%. Both descriptive as well as inferential statistics were applied for data analysis using SPSS. Analysis. Descriptive (frequencies, percentages, mean scores, standard deviations) as well as inferential statistics (Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test, and one-way analysis of variance) were applied for data analysis. Results. The results indicated that the scientists assessed themselves as ‘often true’ for overall information literacy self-efficacy scale and its sub-dimensions. However, item-based analysis revealed that these scientists were less comfortable in utilizing advanced level information literacy skills. In addition, the age, sex, academic qualification, research experience, number of research publications, and instruction received appeared to be the predictor of self-efficacy. Conclusions. Since the scientists were less competent in advanced level information literacy skills, efforts should be focused on improving their self-efficacy. There is a critical need for user-centered instruction programmes for in-service as well as for future scientists. This study would make a worthy contribution to the existing research on workplace information literacy as no such study was found addressing the context of working scientists.
... Another necessity for acquiring TIL is its more appropriate use and application in vocational and higher education in the field of tourism. Since, according to a number of scholars, information literacy is mostly related to the field of academicexchange [9], [10], [11], [12], as such it can be also better discussed and problematized within the professional field of tourism. Additionally, the role of information literacy is found against the background of the fact that it is a tool for achieving more socially inclusive education [13], [14], including tourism education. ...
... The tool with which health management achieves its information literacy is an integrated information system that supports business processes within medical institutions (hospitals) and business processes between different information systems. Information literacy, in the broader sense, as described by Anemaree Lloyd (Lloyd, 2010) is information landscape consisting of social space, physical space and space dealing with the level of knowledge (intersection of truths and beliefs). The space that deals with the level of knowledge is based on information that is true, provable and objective. ...
Conference Paper
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In this publication we set an objectively complicated task to analyse the opportunities of strategic decision-making during crisis by attempting to make a partial analysis of the ongoing crisis caused by the COVID 19 pandemic and the emerged military conflict between the Russian Federation and Ukraine. Crisis circumstances require societies to quickly rethink and develop adequate strategies and respectively to formulate strategic goals and plan processes. In many cases preliminary analysis and assessment are practically impossible /especially when it comes to natural disasters or crises/ and this requires a different operational order of problem solving, which includes formulating new unconventional goals and then implementing planning not objectified by a particular and accurate analysis. All this puts whole systems and societies to the test, and those who are empowered to manage the process – under high pressure from unforeseen circumstances and not always objective judgments. Which, in turn, creates a number of subsequent critical issues in the management process.
... Since then, other organizations and scholars have also attempted to define IL with a list of skills (e.g., Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, CILIP, 2004;Eisenberg & Berkowitz, 1990;UNESCO, 2003). However, accumulating empirical evidence challenges the conception of IL as a linear process and points to its iterative nature (e.g., Lloyd, 2010). ...
Article
Previous scholarship has established a connection between information literacy and writing, highlighting in particular how writing theories could inform our understanding of information literacy. This paper continues this line of inquiry and discusses how information literacy and writing can mutually inform and support each other. Based on a review of major theoretical developments in both fields, this paper proposes a three-dimensional model of information-based academic writing (IBAW) in higher education that foregrounds information literacy as an integral part of the writing process. Specifically, the model illustrates how writing tasks situated in specific rhetorical, disciplinary, and information contexts activate one's knowledge base and generate information needs, which then guides the iterative information literacy and writing processes, as regulated by one's affective and metacognitive strategies, to generate new knowledge. The IBAW model, with the three dimensions and specific factors explicitly identified, also reflects truthfully the defining features of information literacy as contextual, process-oriented, value-laden, interactive, strategic, and always goal-oriented. As such, it also serves as a contextualized, process-oriented, and task-based model for information literacy instruction and development. Implications for how information literacy and information-based academic writing could be taught based on this proposed model are then discussed.
... IL is most commonly considered to be situated and connected to its circumstances and context. Annemaree Lloyd also considers IL to be more than its use in a purely academic context, and has introduced the concept of information literacy landscapes that are constituted through social, epistemic/instrumental and physical, corporeal information modalities which reflect the stable and established knowledge domains of a social site (Lloyd, 2003(Lloyd, , 2006(Lloyd, , 2010(Lloyd, , 2017. This would indicate that IL is considered differently in a kindergarten landscape than in a school or in a workplace. ...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates how children can develop information literacy (IL) skills even before they learn how to read and write. In the project we used a combination of participatory observation and action research-inspired trialling of digital tools. Kindergarteners were given iPads and access to the app Book Creator to create their own digital stories. The electronic books were gathered and made available to the other children in the class, making a custom local digital library for the kindergarten. This article suggests a new way of considering IL as an emergent literacy, or even perhaps emergent information literacy.
... These changes are consistent with Lloyd's (2010) proposal that information literacy ...
... Notwithstanding the notion that ways of knowing, doing and becoming within disciplinary contexts are pivotal learning objectives, they are often overlooked in teaching. In addition, Lloyd (2010) further emphasises that educators should teach for the transfer of these IL competencies. Other researchers in the field of IL contend that universities should develop teaching and learning strategies that are appropriate for enhancing habits of mind within disciplinary contexts (Green, Hammer and Star 2009) and according to the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (the Framework) -for fostering engagement with the core ideas about information and scholarship (ACRL 2016, 2). ...
Article
Full-text available
University students often experience hidden challenges in various courses across all levels of their academic careers. These difficulties often serve to deter student learning and academic progress which may end in high student failure rates. In some instances, this may be attributed to tacit assumptions that academic teachers make about their learners when preparing lesson plans, course content and learning assessments. It is often mistakenly assumed that students already possess the necessary information literacy ways of thinking to overcome bottlenecks within their respective disciplines. To this end, the Teaching and Learning Librarian at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) Library, collaborated with an academic teacher to decode specific disciplinary difficulties and to subsequently enhance the required information literacy knowledge practices in student learning. Using a qualitative research approach, this study reports on how an Economics and Management Science (EMS) lecturer and the librarian used the Decoding the Disciplines Paradigm (DtD) to identify and deconstruct troublesome concepts in the Business and Finance module. The DtD model provides a clearly delineated, seven-step process for identifying and analysing disciplinary challenges and provides guidelines for designing instructional, motivational and assessment strategies that support deep learning. Through the DtD Paradigm, the study identified specific information literacy proficiencies that should be developed or enhanced in student learning. Moreover, the article describes how, as one of the paradigm's steps, pedagogic methods were transformed to develop information literacy ways of thinking.
... However, technological advances have also brought information ethics to the forefront. Researchers need to develop the required skills to work in new "information landscapes" (Lloyd, 2010). Information Literacy (IL) has emerged as an essential concern to establish an ethical foundation to promote "fair, equitable and responsible information use" practices. ...
Conference Paper
The present study is an attempt to assess and establish the information literacy levels of social science researchers for information use ethics. Questionnaire method has been used to collect relevant data on concepts like 'Referencing', 'In-Text Citation', 'Citation Style', and 'Plagiarism'. The descriptive and inferential statistical tools like ANOVA, Post-hoc test using LSD, etc. were used to analyze and interpret the collected data. Overall 79.6% of respondents consisting of 6.2% 'Outstanding', 28.5% 'Excellent', 26.9% 'Very Good and 18.1% 'Good' were found to have high to a very good level of IL skills to understand economic, social and legal issues and use information ethically and legally. The rest 20.4% of the respondents consisting of 10.4% 'Baseline', 3.8% 'Minimal' and 6.2% 'Very Low' were found lacking competency in IL skills to use information ethically and legally. The study findings will be of great help to all the stakeholders to plan, organize and participate in various IL activities and ultimately enhance the IL skill levels of researchers for information use ethics.
... The tool with which health management achieves its information literacy is an integrated information system that supports business processes within medical institutions (hospitals) and business processes between different information systems. Information literacy, in the broader sense, as described by Anemaree Lloyd (Lloyd, 2010) is information landscape consisting of social space, physical space and space dealing with the level of knowledge (intersection of truths and beliefs). The space that deals with the level of knowledge is based on information that is true, provable and objective. ...
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This article briefly analyses the works of Acad. Mihail Arnaudov. He is an author of insightful research of a number of classics of the Bulgarian and world literature. His determination and persistence with which he worked on his research are incredible and admirable. The long-lasting research activity of Acad. Mihail Arnaudov is “sealed” on the pages of books, periodicals, prints and thematically collected clippings from Bulgarian and foreign publications. With the help of his numerous research works covering the topic of Bulgarian National Revival, Acad. Mihail Arnaudov managed to realize his noble ambition – to create a scientific epic of the spiritual leaders of his people, or the “Unforgettable” as he called them himself, during one of the most difficult and most glorious periods in the Bulgarian history. And with even more passion he kept studying life and works of postliberation writers.
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The establishment of the Cambridge Information Literacy Network at the University of Cambridge has provided opportunities to explore how libraries in Cambridge can contribute to institutional strategic goals. A key output of the Cambridge Information Literacy Network is CamGuides, an open educational resource (OER) for taught Master’s students regardless of discipline, background, or mode of study. CamGuides aims to support transition to postgraduate level study within a student’s specific discipline, focusing on the key academic, information, and digital practices with which Master’s students commonly engage. Influenced by sociocultural theories of learning and a practice-based approach to information and digital literacies, CamGuides represents an innovative attempt to provide pre-arrival support for a heterogeneous student population. This article will outline the key stages in the development of CamGuides, including its rationale, pedagogical approach, development, and the ongoing process of reviewing its content and method of delivery.
Article
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to inform on results of the study based on the dissertation project – the study of newcoming university students and their information literacy experience. It describes the three categories of information literacy experience as perceived by these students. Design/methodology/approach The document is based on a qualitative phenomenographic study of 40 first-year undergraduate students of teacher education programs from five faculties of Comenius University in Bratislava. Data were collected from each participant in two stages by three methods: written statements, drawings and interviews. Findings The phenomenographic analysis results in three categories of information literacy: (1) the conception of digital technologies, (2) the conception of knowledge and (3) the conception of truth. The outcome space presented by two alternative models points to a strong interrelation of all three categories. The resulting conceptions point to the diversity of the concept of information literacy in relation to other types of literacies, especially digital, reading and media literacy, as well as to intersections with other scientific disciplines such as psychology, cognitive science or philosophy. Research limitations/implications The most important limits of this qualitative research are the low numbers of participants and the high degree of subjectivity in data evaluation. For this reason, a verification study was carried out one-year later. Originality/value Although phenomenographic studies of information literacy in the educational context are quite common, the third category of this study brings a new contribution to the information literacy theory – the dimension of truth or truthfulness of information.
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Information literacy competencies indicate the ability of an individual to apply a certain search strategy of information discovery, to understand its design, to value judgement, and to use it in various contents and contexts. The influence of information literacy competencies plays an important role in enabling information users to meet their information needs and prepares them for lifelong learning. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of information literacy competencies of users in the Saulsville public library, South Africa. The rationale was a lack of awareness and the inability of the users to find their information needs based on the task and decision at hand. The descriptive survey design adopted for this study made use of a questionnaire to collect data from 1 120 registered members of the Saulsville library. Of the 1 120 registered users being the population for the study, the authors purposively used 10 per cent (112 members) of the population as sample size. The findings revealed that users of the Saulsville public library had limited awareness and competencies of information literacy. The users were exposed to some form of library orientation and the use of library resources during their visit to the library. The findings further indicated that the users’ information literacy competencies were affirmed through the quality of information obtained and the satisfaction of library services rendered by library staff. The study recommends the acquisition of new technologies that could enhance users’ interactive information literacy training in public libraries and formal education settings.
Conference Paper
In this research category, work-in-progress study, the authors conducted eleven semi-structured interviews of employers (five from the United States and six from Sweden), in order to determine the information literacy skills and habits needed by engineering and technology graduates. The authors found similar information needs at both the Swedish and American corporations. They found that, while the core information literacy principles of identifying an information need, locating, accessing, evaluating, integrating, and documenting are valuable skills for students to have, they need to be translated to accommodate the socially constructed information landscapes of each corporation and the more fluid and subtle requirements of workplace information problems. Librarians and engineering educators need to construct more authentic information environments in their courses and design projects, so students will be better prepared to navigate corporate information spaces and culture.
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INTRODUCCIÓN L a información se ha convertido en un fenómeno de estudios de disciplinas tanto de las ciencias naturales como las socia-les, humanidades y artes. Autores como Braman (1988, 16) mencionan que más de cuarenta disciplinas estudian de una ma-nera u otra la información aunque con enfoques distintos. Algu-nas de las disciplinas que han incorporado a la información como su objeto de estudio son la Ciencia de la Información, la Tecnolo-gía de la Información, la Sociología, la Inteligencia Artificial, las Ciencias de la Computación, la Bibliotecología y disciplinas afines (Holland 2008, 7). Después de la segunda mitad del siglo xx y las primeras dé-cadas del siglo xxi, se presentaron acontecimientos que de una manera u otra afectaron el paisaje de la información. Annemaree Lloyd manifiesta que por paisaje de información se debe entender a aquel que permite describir el contexto en el sentido más amplio de la palabra en el que la información ha sido investigada […] los paisajes de información
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Integrative bioethics is an innovative concept and project in the field of bioethics, which gathers various scientific approaches (multidisciplinarity, interdisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity) and cultural approaches (pluriperspectivity) to the ethical issues of life and current life manipulations in the global technological society. It covers a broad spectrum of topics—from clinical medical practice and biomedical research, through human-animal relationships, to global-ecological problems. By doing so, integrative bioethics opposes any scientific and cultural reductionism and criticizes the regimes of total power over knowledge and life (represented by ruling models of techno-science, the economy, politics and media), which is the point where integrative bioethics meets “biopolitical theory”, on one hand, and the concept of “knowledge landscapes”, on the other hand. However, integrative bioethics not only addresses general questions on the nature of knowledge and science but also represents a solid framework for discussion on the specific issues from the fields of biomedical research, clinical medicine and healthcare, which become more and more complex in the context of the digital society, and what health agency means here. Integrative bioethics requires answers oriented towards theoretical, that is, scientific goals (knowledge of particular sciences and knowledge as an entirety of all the sciences); practical, that is, ethical, political and economic goals (background of the actions); and technical, that is, medical, biotechnological and information-technological goals (performing the actions). Drawing on works from “integrative bioethics” (e.g. Čović and Hoffmann, 2007; Jurić, 2017), “biopolitical theory” (e.g. Foucault, 2008; Agamben, 1998) and the exploration of “knowledge landscapes” (e.g. Svalastog et al., 2017; Gajović and Svalastog, 2016; Svalastog et al., 2015), this chapter will consider different aspects of the question of how the conceptual framework of integrative bioethics and its methodology can be applied in the context of the digital society, including the challenges of managing information that contributes towards knowledge and health.
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Library science programs must be responsive to the wide variety of workplace needs to ensure that graduating students are prepared with appropriate knowledge and skills regardless of where their career path brings them, and to do so they must understand the various needs and expectations of the field. Through a nationwide study of over 2,000 current professionals and LIS faculty, this study examines the knowledge, skills, and abilities identified as core for special and corporate librarians. The results help establish a baseline of skills for corporate and special librarians, which will be of interest to current and emerging professionals interested in a career in these settings and could have implications for LIS education.
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The educational theories and practices utilised in educational institutions in modern industrial societies are based, to some extent, on the non-empirical social and behavioural sciences and on teaching practices based on prevailing culture.
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The article examines the strengths and limitations of the analogy of information landscapes proposed by Annemaree Lloyd. The analogy offers a novel approach to the conceptualization of the spatial contexts of information practices. Drawing on the ideas of metaphor analysis, the analogy is scrutinized by comparing the similarities between its source domain, that is, natural landscape, and target domain, that is, information landscape. The study identified three main aspects of the analogy: (1) information landscapes as spaces affording the accomplishment of information practices, (2) information landscapes as spaces entwining physical and imaginary qualities and (3) information landscapes as socially constructed spatial contexts of information practices. The findings suggest that the construct of information landscapes represents a spatial analogy in which the properties of the source domain partially elucidate the nature of the contexts of information practices. The analogy works best with regard to similarities between affordances offered by natural landscapes and information landscapes. The major limitation of the analogy deals with difficulties to map physical features of the source domain onto the cognitive and social qualifiers of the target domain.
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This chapter outlines a broad view of information processing systems based on the research findings presented in the previous chapters. This broad view develops the generalisations of learning and memory processes that were based in the commonalities of matter and energy pathways between organisms or structures and their environment. This view is described in terms of novel conceptualisations of information and information processing systems, and these conceptualisations serve as an infrastructure for the development of an overarching framework that may be applied universally to learning and memory processes. This framework is then applied specifically to descriptions of human interaction with the environment in a broad context that includes input and output of environmental information and its processing within the entire human organism. Human cognitive processes are accommodated within this framework through consideration of the human nervous system, inclusive of the brain, as a component information processing system of the human organism.
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When acknowledging the gap between theory to practice in information literacy instruction, Todd, Journal of Information Literacy, 2017, 11, pp. 120–136 called for a deeper understanding of information literacy to move forward in a sustainable fashion. This study aims to investigate to what extent librarians understand the concept of information literacy as a social practice. This poster presents findings from an open‐ended survey distributed to librarians to investigate librarians' understanding of information as a social practice.
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[engl. INFORMATION LITERACY AND INFORMATION EDUCATION] Komplexný analytický pohľad na koncept informačnej gramotnosti a metódy informačného vzdelávania. 1. Informačné prostredie a človek v ňom. 2. Informačná gramotnosť (definičné ukotvenie, atribúty, prieniky). 3. Analytický pohľad na informačnú gramotnosť. 4. Modely informačnej gramotnosti. 5. Štandardy informačnej gramotnosti. 6. Dizajn informačného vzdelávania. 7. Hodnotenie informačnej gramotnosti. PRÍLOHA A: Prehľad operačných modelov informačnej gramotnosti. PRÍLOHA B: Prehľad vzdelávacích štandardov a kompetenčných rámcov IG. PRÍLOHA C: Rozšírená vizualizácia schémy modelu Concept-Based Inquiry. PRÍLOHA D: Aktívne slovesá podľa psychologických domén. PRÍLOHA E: Hodnotenie IG – príklad skórovacej tabuľky. PRÍLOHA F: Anotovaná rešerš k problematike informačného vzdelávania.
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Emergent realities such as the COVID‐19 pandemic and corresponding “infodemic,” the resurgence of Black Lives Matter, climate catastrophe, and fake news, misinformation, disinformation, and so on challenge information researchers to reconsider the limitations and potential of the user‐centered paradigm that has guided much library and information studies (LIS) research. In order to engage with these emergent realities, understanding who people are in terms of their social identities, social power, and as epistemic agents—that is, knowers, speakers, listeners, and informants—may provide insight into human information interactions. These are matters of epistemic injustice. Drawing heavily from Miranda Fricker's work Epistemic Injustice: Power & the Ethics of Knowing, I use the concept of epistemic injustice (testimonial, systematic, and hermeneutical injustice) to consider people as epistemic beings rather than “users” in order to potentially illuminate new understandings of the subfields of information behavior and information literacy. Focusing on people as knowers, speakers, listeners, and informants rather than “users” presents an opportunity for information researchers, practitioners, and LIS educators to work in service of the epistemic interests of people and in alignment with liberatory aims.
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Information literacy forms a key concept within Library and Information Science, where it forms the focus of scholarship, conferences, journals, and teaching librarian practice, alike. However, little is known about how other fields and disciplines have employed these outputs within their own research and practice. This paper examines how the concept of information literacy has been leveraged into the discourses of non-Library and Information Science disciplinary landscapes. This is achieved through a qualitative mapping of five different fields and disciplines, including Higher Education, Management and Business, Public Health, Nursing and Psychology, to identify how information literacy terminology, definitions, theories, and frameworks have travelled across scholarly and practice boundaries to become appropriated into other disciplinary landscapes. The aim of this collaborative work is to develop an indicative rather than an exhaustive understanding of what travels within information literacy research and practice and to strengthen the Library and Information Science narrative on the impact of information literacy activities.
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We consider the extent to which information literacy (IL) appears in academic literature outside the discipline of library and information studies (LIS). Members of the Forum on Information Literacy will each present findings from an ongoing project to show how key IL terminology and concepts have been adopted within other research disciplines. Knowing how information literacy is understood outside LIS is vital in moving forward in our goal to extend IL research and practice beyond academic contexts and supporting inter-disciplinary partners.
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This article describes the process of design, validation, and implementation (N = 609) of a questionnaire drawn up ad hoc to assess the digital competence of compulsory education students (ages 11 to 13) in the area of communication. The test measures students’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the six competences that make up the area of communication, as established in the Framework for the Development and Knowledge of Digital Competence in Europe (DigComp): interacting through new technologies, sharing of information and content, online citizen participation, collaboration through digital technologies, netiquette, and digital identity management. The purposes of the study are to design and validate an instrument to assess compulsory education students’ digital competences in the area of communication based on their knowledge, skills, and attitudes and to analyse such instrument’s psychometric characteristics with special emphasis on its reliability and validity. The method used consisted of the implementation of various psychometric validation techniques and the analysis of the results based on statistical descriptions. Items show adequate discrimination and difficulty indices. Validity was guaranteed through expert judgement and factorial analysis of the test. The conclusion stresses the pressing need for education centres to provide students with adequate educational-communicative training.
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In the last years clustering and classification approaches have been proposed by the knowledge engineers in the context of e-learning technologies. These approaches offer intelligent methodologies, techniques, and algorithms that can help solving problems in a variety of education/learning/training domains. These techniques have been successfully used in solving many of the e-learning problems. This paper discusses the benefits of the clustering and classification approaches in the context of smart learning environment.
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Cilj je rada predstaviti rezultate istraživanja o potrebama nezaposlenih građana Osječko-baranjske županije u svrhu unapređenja spoznaja o poboljšanju službi, usluga, programa i aktivnosti narodnih knjižnica te utjecaja na kvalitetu života nezaposlenih građana. Istraživanje je provedeno kvantitativnom metodom slučajnog uzorka (N = 250). U članku je prikazana slika stanja prije globalne zdravstvene pandemije COVID-19, krize koja je utjecala na cijeli svijet. Prikupljeni podaci statistički su obrađeni u Statističkom paketu za društvene znanosti primjenom opisne i korelacijske analize između dvije skupine varijabli te su izraženi u postotcima. Najvažniji rezultati istraživanja pokazali su da ispitani građani imaju potrebu za učenjem u sastavu cjeloživotnog obrazovanja, ali da su se, s druge strane, u najvećem ukupnom postotku na ponuđene potrebe u knjižničnom prostoru, izjasnili da nemaju potrebe. Najizraženije potrebe ispitanih građana su potrebe za učenjem engleskoga i njemačkoga jezika; računalnim i tehničkim vještinama, potreba za usavršavanjem komunikacijskih vještina; usavršavanjem dodatnih socijalnih vještina kroz timski rad, upoznavanjem pravila poslovnog bontona, stjecanjem organizacijskih vještina, promocijskih vještina, učenjem neverbalne komunikacije ili govora tijela. Rezultat istraživanja pokazao je da, unatoč tomu što je dio ispitanika (41,6 %) član narodne knjižnice, i dalje ima različite potrebe u sastavu cjeloživotnog obrazovanja, a njihova im narodna knjižnica ne pruža mogućnost ispunjavanja. Pokazao je i to da nisu sve narodne knjižnice u Osječko-baranjskoj županiji otvorene za sve korisnike. Nezaposleni, društveno isključeni građani mišljenja su da narodna knjižnica može pomoći u razvoju zajednice, ali ne i nezaposlenima. = The aim of this paper is to present the results of the research on the needs of unemployed citizens in the Osijek-Baranja County with the purpose of improving the knowledge of advancing the services, programs, and activities of public libraries, as well as the quality of life of unemployed citizens. Research was conducted using the random sampling method (N=250). The article presents a picture of the situation before the global COVID-19 health pandemic, the crisis that affected the whole world. The collected data was statistically analyzed in SPSS, the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, using correlation and descriptive analysis on two groups and was thereafter expressed in percentages. The most important results of the research showed that the selected citizens have a need for lifelong learning, but that at the same time the largest percentage of them do not have the need to fulfill the named needs in a library space. Most pronounced needs of tested citizens are the needs to learn English and German; computer and technical skills, the need to perfect communication skills; perfecting additional social skills through teamwork, familiarizing oneself with workspace etiquette, gaining organizational skills, promotional skills, learning nonverbal communication or body language. The results show that public libraries do not allow a portion of the subjects (41.6%) to fulfill their needs, despite them having a membership to the public library and having different needs for lifelong learning. Likewise, results show that not all public libraries within the Osijek-Baranja County are open to all users. Socially excluded unemployed citizens believe that the public library can help develop communities and unemployed citizens alike.
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The pressure is high on career educators to develop information literacies as a life skill for themselves as well as for youth, particularly those from disadvantaged communities, and to document and process career information in a rapidly changing world of work that is relevant to their sociocultural and environmental contexts. We employ a critical or transformative approach to information literacies to explore young people’s socially situated practices of collecting, validating, and processing career information as well as how they might “democratically transform structures of authority over information exchanges, and then maintain scrutiny over this authority” (Whitworth A, Radical information literacy: reclaiming the political heart of the IL movement. Elsevier, 2014, p. 2). We draw from qualitative interviews with ten boys studying in 10th grade at a government school in Delhi, India, and videos produced by them to map their career information landscapes. Using an education for sustainable development lens, “bumps” were made visible in their information landscapes, that is, the tensions that emerge between multiple informational actors for reimagining sustainable futures. We suggest that these tensions can serve as cultural resources that students can democratically engage with in developing crucial career and life skills for their futures.
Article
This conceptual paper identifies future directions for information practices theoretical discourses addressing marginality, community, and embodiment. We extend arguments from critical research identifying how existing discourses fail to capture the nuanced, lived experiences of people and communities confronting marginalization, predominantly via their reinforcement of deficit narratives. We then connect a series of qualitative projects examining the information practices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual communities in the American South with relevant Library and Information Science (LIS) research to examine how marginality, community, and embodiment shape these practices. Specifically, we introduce a conceptual model that describes marginality by framing information practices as tactical and agentic responses to and refutations of social and structural barriers and risks. While some of the information practices of participants and communities appear to be uninformed or unsafe, they represent the products of community sharing and vetting. Embodied navigations further inform participant practices as they navigate information worlds produced and informed by their intersectional identities. These arguments coincide with key categories established within our model that describe information practices: defensive and protective, and community and self. Based on these insights, we offer directions for future research and theory to reorient existing discourses in ways that inspire middle‐range theory building that fully captures people's lived experiences.
Article
Information studies have identified numerous needs and barriers to the integration of asylum seekers and refugees; however, little emphasis has been placed thus far on their need to keep their own culture, values, and traditions alive. In this work, we use ethnographic constructivist grounded theory to explore the place of heritage in the information experience of people who have sought asylum in the United Kingdom. Based on our findings, we propose to conceptualize heritage as an affective and meaningful information literacy practice. Such conceptualization fosters integration by allowing people to simultaneously maintain their own ways of knowing and adapt to local ones. Our research approach provides scholars with a conceptual tool to holistically explore affective, meaningful, and cultural information practices. This study also reveals implications for policymakers, third sector organizations, and cultural institutions working toward the more sustainable integration of asylum seekers and refugees.
Article
Information literacy is a critical topic in contemporary pedagogy and information science, it is ranked among the essential competencies for the 21st century, and in recent years, it has received increasing research interest. The problem, however, is that the research is focused mainly on primary and university (college) contexts and only rarely analyses secondary school settings. This paper, therefore, focuses on a group of high school students and on whether the literature's idea of their needs corresponds to their actual needs. Based on the analysis of 32 documents indexed in the Scopus and Web of Science databases, the paper identifies seven significant discursive areas addressed in the literature, both theoretically and empirically. These are the relationship of libraries and librarians to the development of information literacy, information evaluation, the relationship of information literacy and learning competencies, connection with other competencies, emphasis on constructivist approach, the social dimension of information literacy and its possible use for self-actualization. These topics form a specific research discourse, which they set out. In the second phase of the research, focus groups (8 groups in 4 schools, 41 students) on information literacy are studied through the seven essential discourses mentioned. Although our sample lacked reflections on the relationship between the library and high school students, the remaining six fundamental discourses appeared in the testimonies of high school students (Libraries and librarians, evaluation of information, learning competencies, connection with other literacy, constructivist approach, the social dimension of information literacy, information literacy as a means of self-actualization). The findings show that the main difference between literary discourse and student responses is in the perception of libraries as centres of information literacy development and that students prefer the school or their teachers in their place. Keywords: focus groups, information evaluation, information literacy, media literacy, overview study
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Most research on information literacy has emerged from the academic sector and there is a lack of research undertaken in the workplace. To further expand on this area of study, a survey was undertaken to investigate librarians’ understanding of information literacy and the application of information literacy in government libraries in Australia. Of particular interest is that many government librarians either do not include ‘critical thinking’ skills in their definition of information literacy, or if they do include it, they do not believe that they should have the responsibility for teaching it. This most likely reflects the difference in client base, students compared with adult professionals. There was a high response for instruction for online library services (catalogue, journals, databases and library website). This indicates a recognised need for instruction and the development of courses and support materials in these services.
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Information literacy is a meta-competency that encapsulates the generic skills of defining, locating and accessing information. It is an essential and integral competency for both the knowledge worker and effective knowledge management. Librarians need to realign their roles from providers and organizers of information, to facilitators and educators of clients’ information access and process. This requires librarians to develop partnerships with workplace communities so as to understand the role that information plays in the knowledge economy; and to develop a new language that is relevant to workplace communities and ties information literacy instruction to the authentic situations of the workplace. Information literacy is a meta-competency: it is the currency of the knowledge economy. The themes introduced in this paper are drawn from the current doctoral research of the author. The research examines what it means to individuals to be information literate in a workplace context, and how information literacy manifests and transfers in to workplace practice.
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This article is based on research into the practical problem of masculinity and learning and practising safety in the mining industry. The research began with a post-structural analysis of gendered subjectivity in miners' yarns but argues that a concept of ‘culture’ is needed to elucidate a middle-level relationship between individual workers and the organisation. Concepts of ‘culture’, however, are problematic in this context because they have been used uncritically in organisational literature. The author explores the enactment of a concept of ‘culture’ through an ethnographic study of mine workers. It was found that workplace cultures are characterised by violence and aggression, risk taking, and competitiveness, which impact on learning and practising safety. In emergent understandings of culture in this study the author suggests that ‘culture’ can be reconceptualised in order to involve workers in their own cultural analysis and to articulate the relationship between the complex, collective, and contested nature of contemporary workplaces and the learning that takes place there. Such a cultural analysis enables the possibility of identifying sites of change and ‘culture’ as a concept that can be mobilised as a technology for workers to intervene in their own workplace practices.
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Many countries have implemented versions of competency-based training in which competency standards or statements serve to provide standardized learning and skill development outcomes for vocational education and training. It seems that a main attraction that motivated the introduction of such competency-based systems was the assumption by some that they would be 'failsafe', in that achievement of the learning and skill development outcomes would guarantee that the learner was workplace competent. However there were always convincing conceptual reasons for denying that the achievement of standards-based learning and skill development outcomes would be equivalent to being workplace competent. This paper aims to explain these reasons, to provide empirical evidence of the scope of the gap between formal standardized training and workplace competence, and to address the implications of this gap for the improvement of vocational education and training. The assumption that the gap could be avoided overlooks the crucial importance of context and culture in workplace performance. It is argued that sound vocational education and training needs to take account of these features.
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Purpose – The purpose of this article is to explore the contribution that an information literacy approach to the empirical study of workplace learning can make to how people understand and conceptualise workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach – Three cohorts of fire‐fighters working in two regional locations in NSW, Australia were interviewed using a semi‐structured interview approach. Constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed to work with the data; post‐structuralism. Findings – Study findings indicate that an understanding of information literacy and information literacy practices contributes to workplace learning by highlighting the relationship between different modalities of information, and the relationship between workplace learning and professional identity. Information literacy is not solely confined to developing skills related to accessing information in textual or digital modalities, but requires access to social and physical sources of information. Originality/value – The information literacy approach contributes to a developing understanding of the role of workplace learning by highlighting the process as a catalyst for learning. This process is underpinned by ways of knowing about the types of situated information sources that are valuable for learning about practice and profession.
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To date, LIS studies of workplace information practices have primarily focused on occupations that require a university education, and, consequently, little is known about the information practices of blue-collar workers. This study uses a qualitative case study approach to examine the workplace information practices of a blue-collar worker--a vault inspector at a hydroelectric utility company. Using social practice theory as a framework, this article argues that vault inspection is a practice involving situated judgment, embodiment, educated perception, finding and navigating, and classification. This article also asserts that the practice of vault inspection produces documents that act as "boundary objects" that dynamically connect disparate parts of the organization and meet a range of organizational information requirements. This suggests that vault inspection is an "information practice".
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This article develops a range of concrete analytic approaches to empirical studies inspired by poststructuralist thinking. The analytic strategies offered provide examples of "putting deconstruction to work" in the context of the analysis of qualitative data. The discourse-destabilizing impacts are shown by examples derived from the author's own research and that of others. Among the analytic strategies, the author discusses the ways in which constructions of discursive categories and storylines can be investigated. And as a means of sharpening the discourse-transgressing lens, the use of troubling and alienating concepts and models of analysis is explored, together with the use of paradoxes and nonconventional renarrations of data. The approaches are not presented as directly transferable techniques. They are meant to work as inspiration for other researchers in their methodological development of analytic tools.
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An ontogenetically-informed epistemology is necessary to understandings of apprenticeship learning. The methodology required in this enterprise is a constructive phenomenology, a phenomenology that takes into account the fact that as infants, we were apprentices of our own bodies: we all learned our bodies and learned to move ourselves. The major focus of this essay is on infant social relationships that develop on the ground of our original corporeal-kinetic apprenticeship. It shows how joint attention, imitation, and turn-taking - all richly examined areas in infant social development - are the foundation of apprenticeship learning in later adult life. The relationship between each infant capacity and later apprenticeship learning is demonstrated in examples from present-day research, specifically, research in the areas of medicine, sport, music, and tailoring, and research carried out by philosophers on apprenticeship learning.
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This article reports on a study we conducted with first-year students in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne in 2003. Building upon our 2002 research (Library Review, 2003, vol 52, n°5 pp209–217), we investigated the prior library instruction, information preferences and skills of students enrolled in first-year subjects in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Melbourne. Our article reflects on how this investigation has broadened our understanding of the information literacy (IL) knowledge and prior experience of entry-level students at university. It considers the implications that the results of our study have for ‘teaching librarians’ and attempts to answer questions about how we can better assist students to build upon what they already know.
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This article contributes to discourse-oriented, information-seeking research by showing how discourses, from a neopragmatist perspective, can be explored as tools that people employ when they actively engage in information practices in varied social contexts. A study of nurses and the nursing profession in Sweden is used as an empirical example of such a context, which is in the article understood as a community of justification. The nurses' accounts of information practices are further analyzed as expressions of their use of discourses as tools in the promotion of specific interests as to what the nursing profession should be. The analysis shows how the science-oriented medical discourse and the holistically oriented nursing discourse are two tools employed in the nurses' accounts of their information practices. In these discourses, which operate at both a workplace and an occupational level, a key component is what nurses consider to be relevant information.
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Information literacy is being increasingly recognised as an important educational outcome for university graduates. How it is experienced, however, has only recently become the subject of scrutiny. The study reported here examines varying conceptions of information literacy amongst a group of lecturers, librarians, staff developers and learning counsellors. A phenomenographic approach was used to discover their conceptions. Data were gathered from participants, both male and female, through interviews, e‐mail discussions and workshops. As an outcome of the analysis, seven categories, or “faces” of information literacy were discovered. These categories depict information literacy as it is conceived or experienced. They provide target conceptions for the educational process which differ from the more conventional competencies or skill‐based objectives.
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Public libraries have long played an active role in creating literate communities, and we must now take steps to create information literate communities. Librarians and library stakeholders can use reliable advocacy techniques to strengthen information literacy in their own communities.
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The purposes of the study were to explore the role of Canada's public libraries in developing the public's information literacy (IL) skills, to explore current IL train-ing practices, and to explore the perspectives and IL experiences of individuals who visit public libraries to access the Internet. This article documents the second phase of a larger study, which included semistructured interviews of library staff () and customers () as well as site observations conducted at five n p 28 n p 25 public libraries. Analyses were conducted qualitatively within a phenomenological framework. Results show that the primary use of the Internet in public libraries is communication. Customers reported confidence in using the Internet, while library staff indicated that customers' IL skills were poor. Greater attention needs to be paid to connecting to customers who believe they are highly information literate yet may lack sufficient skills.
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Information literacy is about people's information practices in their information and communication technology (ICT) environment. Increasing access to ICTs to bridge the digital divide has implications for the information literacy needs of people in developing communities. The research described in this paper investigated development workers' perceptions of information literacy needs amongst local staff participating in community development projects in cross-cultural situations. A phenomenographic approach was used to elicit five hierarchically related, qualitatively different understandings of information literacy needs within the development context. The results reveal possible directions for those involved in bringing ICTs into workplace settings within developing communities. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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This chapter introduces and draws upon the other papers in this volume to address the issue of how task performance is achieved in workplace settings and the extent to which the knowledge needed for task performance is generic (that is, transcends workplace settings). Specific questions involving the mutual interaction of task performance, knowledge use, and people and artifacts are raised. The questions are then explored from a variety of theoretical frameworks, including cultural historical activity theory, cognitive theory, and socio-cultural and socio-linguistic theories.
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Three problems in relation to Luciano Floridi’s work on the Philosophy of Information (PI) and the relationship of PI to Library and Information Science (LIS) are considered: the claim that LIS is a materials-based discipline, Floridi’s claim about Information as a message transfer system, and his downgrading of Social Epistemology to be a subset of PI. The recent history of LIS and the practice of professional library work are examined for evidence of the basis for making claims about LIS. A view of information based on individual interpretations is preferred to Floridi’s account, which is found to be too innocent of LIS practice to be accepted without revision, as is his view of LIS as an applied PI. published or submitted for publication
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This chapter focuses on an apparent information literacy imbalance between many university students’ well developed digital skills and less developed critical awareness. The adverse effect of this imbalance on their learning may be intensified by students’ differing cultural, linguistic and educational experiences. In addressing this imbalance we propose an information literacy approach, underpinned by a series of conceptual models, which fosters the reflective use of information for learning in a dynamic and culturally diverse higher education context. The models presented in this chapter combine principles of reflective practice, action research and information literacy in a framework that provides a sound theoretical base for fostering a critical approach to information use for learning. They are intended to be used both with and by learners and they have an inclusive orientation that accommodates cultural, linguistic and educational differences. Information literacy educators may find them useful as a basis for analysing learners’ needs and for designing and implementing evidence-based information literacy responses. Learners may use the models to scaffold their ongoing information literacy development or to monitor their research progress.